Washers - yes, but no dryers... how do you dry clothes in Budapest?

I have been looking at apartments to rent in Budapest... I've noticed that there are washers in the homes (strangely, mostly in bathrooms and many in the kitchen) but have not seen any dryers.  How do you dry clothes?
Also:  some apartments don't appear to have washers.  Do people use a service or take to a laundromat or a cry cleaner?

You hang them to dry on one of these: https://www.mall.hu/ruhaszarito

There are sevceral self-service laundries in the city, find them on google maps.

In bathroom or kitchens because that is where the water inlets and outlets are located. Few apartments were or are build with specific spaces for washing machines (especially the older ones).

And drying as atomheart said. And there are even models that fits over your bathtub edge -- so with a washer in the bathroom, you just remove your cloths and immediately hang them up to drip dry into the bath.

https://www.kamody.hu/leifheit-pegasus- … 81540-6980

Or over your heater to dry things faster:

https://www.kamody.hu/leifheit-universa … 81413-6853

atomheart :

You hang them to dry on one of these: https://www.mall.hu/ruhaszarito

If you don't have a garden or a balcony, do you keep this in your apartment?  How odd is that???  Is there no common place in apartment buildings where people can hang their laundry out?

It will take some getting used to after 40 plus years of instant dry clothes with no wrinkles (the hot dryer smooths out the fabric and when folded neatly, most need no ironing)...  I guess, one can always buy a dryer and stick in a corner someplace...

I have been living in Australia for almost two years now and they actually prefer to hang laundry outside when living in a house, even though people have dryers.  Tradition; I guess... In apartments, however, they have dryers.  Just like in the U.S., there is usually a "laundry room", or at least a closet that holds a washer and dryer.  If there is a space problem, they use stackables... Larger homes have entire rooms with kitchen-type cabinets for storage, sink, etc. - a spacious set-up just for laundry. 

https://www.beeyoutifullife.com/35500-s … le-washer/

Affordable housing neighborhoods either have a laundry in the complex or have laundromats within walking distance to the homes with washer/dryer set-ups.  City apartments have laundromats in the basement with a dozen washers and dryers for all to use.  In big cities, they have dry cleaner service everywhere, where they also do bulk laundry for a fee.  You bring your laundry bag in the morning, and they give it back to you all nice and folded in the afternoon - used to be $8 (about 2,000 HUF) per bag, about a week's laundry. 

I guess there are certain things I will miss about the "West"...

atomheart :

You hang them to dry on one of these: https://www.mall.hu/ruhaszarito

If you don't have a garden or a balcony, do you keep this in your apartment?  How odd is that???  Is there no common place in apartment buildings where people can hang their laundry out?

It will take some getting used to after 40 plus years of instant dry clothes with no wrinkles (the hot dryer smooths out the fabric and when folded neatly, most need no ironing)...  I guess, one can always buy a dryer and stick in a corner someplace...

I have been living in Australia for almost two years now and they actually prefer to hang laundry outside when living in a house, even though people have dryers.  Tradition; I guess... In apartments, however, they have dryers.  Just like in the U.S., there is usually a "laundry room", or at least a closet that holds a washer and dryer.  If there is a space problem, they use stackables... Larger homes have entire rooms with kitchen-type cabinets for storage, sink, etc. - a spacious set-up just for laundry. 

https://www.beeyoutifullife.com/35500-s … le-washer/

Affordable housing neighborhoods either have a laundry in the complex or have laundromats within walking distance to the homes with washer/dryer set-ups.  City apartments have laundromats in the basement with a dozen washers and dryers for all to use.  In big cities, they have dry cleaner service everywhere, where they also do bulk laundry for a fee.  You bring your laundry bag in the morning, and they give it back to you all nice and folded in the afternoon - used to be $8 (about 2,000 HUF) per bag, about a week's laundry. 

I guess there are certain things I will miss about the "West"...

klsallee :

And drying as atomheart said. And there are even models that fits over your bathtub edge -- so with a washer in the bathroom, you just remove your cloths and immediately hang them up to drip dry into the bath. -

https://www.kamody.hu/leifheit-pegasus- … 81540-6980

Or over your heater to dry things faster:

https://www.kamody.hu/leifheit-universa … 81413-6853

I guess, I will appear to be insanely spoiled by saying this, but OMG!!!  (Oh, My God)

After 40 plus years of instant dry clothes and no fuss, now I will have to hang things all over the room and wait for them to dry...  In the U.S. that would be unheard of...  No one would do that! 

NEW DISCOVERY:  I just looked online in Hungary for dryers, and found out that now they make machines that are "all-in-one" washer/dryers...  Did not even know that they exist!  So, for HUF 200,000 or so, problem solved! 

https://edigital.hu/haztartas-otthon-la … uga-c28504

I'm not in Hungary, but have a similar problem. Basically, you get used to slightly damp clothes about half the year. And to clothes hanging around drying everywhere inside when it's raining, making the paint peel. Which is about half the year.

If you're getting a new washer, go for a top-end model with a very high-speed extraction cycle. Your stuff will come out of the machine damp not soaking.

As for a dryer, if you get one make sure you can vent it properly.

zif :

I'm not in Hungary, but have a similar problem. Basically, you get used to slightly damp clothes about half the year. And to clothes hanging around drying everywhere inside when it's raining, making the paint peel. Which is about half the year.

If you're getting a new washer, go for a top-end model with a very high-speed extraction cycle. Your stuff will come out of the machine damp not soaking.

As for a dryer, if you get one make sure you can vent it properly.

Thank you for your comments! 

Oh, boy... This is getting worse by the minute!  They actually have washers that don't spin the water out of clothes? 

So, even if I rent a place that has a washer in it might not spin the clothes nearly dry as the machines in the U.S. and AU and even in Fiji do?  I am DEFINITELY buying a dryer or a washer/dryer combo!  For me, it is a MUST investment...  Did not even know that they have the "combo" types until I just looked it up.  It will cost me about HUF 200,000, but to avoid the hassle, it is worth it.

https://edigital.hu/haztartas-otthon-la … uga-c28504

Oh, I think all washing machines spin to a degree. But more expensive machines have stronger motors and spin faster. You can get a Zanussi with a 500rpm spin cycle. Or one that does 2800rpm. That's power!

Hell, some peoply here wash their clothes by hand!  :o

Panni36 :

NEW DISCOVERY:  I just looked online in Hungary for dryers, and found out that now they make machines that are "all-in-one" washer/dryers...  Did not even know that they exist!  So, for HUF 200,000 or so, problem solved!

As Zif said, normally any sort of dryer often requires a vent to the outside. Either through the wall or up a single purpose vertical pipe to the roof. Difficult to do in an apartment. So you should check the venting requirements of any dryer system before purchase and installing to see if it needs venting or not and of what type. Venting issues are probably the main reason most people do not have dryers (that and the space, electrical cost/energy efficiency issues).

Also check your space before purchase. In some places there is little room to open the forward loading machines and a top loader may be better.

zif :

Oh, I think all washing machines spin to a degree. But more expensive machines have stronger motors and spin faster. You can get a Zanussi with a 500rpm spin cycle. Or one that does 2800rpm. That's power!

500 is too slow. Our 12 year old LG 5 KG washer spin cycle goes up to 1000. And at that speed things are easy to hang dry. And If I remember correctly, it was only about 80,000 HUF at the time. Not expensive (IMHO).

Our Whirlpool washer has a drying cycle in it but when my husband looked at the meter turning at a high speed he shut the dryer off.
I honestly have forgotten how to use that cycle, no matter my husband does the laundry. The only housework he does.
If I could get him to iron, then my life would be perfect... Actually he does iron most of his clothing, mine not so much.
They sell actual clothing dryers here now some sets are very nice, maybe just a bit over $1,000 for a new set.
Finding room however inside the flat can be a issue in smaller places.
Our friends redid their flat and have a stacking washer dryer set built into the wall in their bathroom, vents were put in to let out the air and no hoses from the washer are exposed.
Nice , really nice.
We planned to use "Bubbles" a do it yourself laundry. Only 1,000 F for a wash and another 1,000 to use the dryers.
Just got used to doing it at home but if our washer ever breaks we may start going there, just up the st. a few blocks away.
We have a large loft inside our flat so we hang any large pieces up there, have a "fruglie" ( probably spelled that one wrong" in our bathroom for small pieces to dry, just turn on the bathroom fan.
Just hard in wet weather, takes days for somethings to dry.
Have to check the weather before laundry day.
We have some neighbors who hang their clothing and blankets over the railing to dry which looks a bit "cheesy" to us.
Who wants to air their "clean" as opposed to dirty laundry for the world to see?
I'm always thinking about purchasing a pair of huge granny panties, XXXL size, putting a mess of food stains on them and letting them fly free in the wind, maybe then our neighbors might get the hint as to how disgusting it is to see their laundry all the time.
Actually that's just part of living in Hungary, you get used to it.
When we go to Vegas and visit our son I often forget they have a clothing dryer, nothing better then a nice hot freshly dried towel straight  out of the dryer....
I also forget to use their dish washer etc.
Not a big deal, you can buy a dryer here these days if it's that important for you.
My good clothing is hand washed or dry cleaned.

In the old days before people got greedy , when the gov, owned all the flats and everyone paid rent to the gov., Every house had a drying room up on the roof.
People hung their clothing up there to dry on racks or lines.
They have converted every space into something to make money now, added more flats etc. so no more drying room for the houses.
The thing is here in Hungary you can live exactly the same way as in the west, if you're willing to pay the price.
You can find anything here, dryers,dishwashers whatever, just be willing to pay for them, utilities will go up with usage.

You have to remember this is central Europe and not Australia or America and it's very common to have the washing machine in the bathroom, this also applies to houses that has a bit more space.

There are machines that wash and dry your clothes but as these do 2 jobs they are a bit more expensive, also come with a problem if the dryer side becomes broken for some reason you are left without the washer until you can get it fixed.

Marilyn Tassy :

We planned to use "Bubbles" a do it yourself laundry. Only 1,000 F for a wash and another 1,000 to use the dryers.
...............
hang any large pieces up there, have a "fruglie" ( probably spelled that one wrong" in our bathroom for small pieces to dry, just turn on the bathroom fan.
Just hard in wet weather, takes days for somethings to dry.

Now that you described the realities of doing laundry in Budapest, I think I will probably opt for Bubbles...  I guess, I will need to rent a place that is close to one.  I could not possibly live with wet clothing hanged everywhere...  I grew-up like that, but it was such a long time ago, I don't even remember.  Had instant dry and unwrinkled close for over 40 years - don't wish to go back in time...  2,000 Ft sounds reasonable for getting all the laundry done. 

These are the kind of realities that one has to think about when planning a major move to a different culture.

Thanks so much for the details!

Panni36 :
Marilyn Tassy :

We planned to use "Bubbles" a do it yourself laundry. Only 1,000 F for a wash and another 1,000 to use the dryers.
...............
hang any large pieces up there, have a "fruglie" ( probably spelled that one wrong" in our bathroom for small pieces to dry, just turn on the bathroom fan.
Just hard in wet weather, takes days for somethings to dry.

Now that you described the realities of doing laundry in Budapest, I think I will probably opt for Bubbles...  I guess, I will need to rent a place that is close to one.  I could not possibly live with wet clothing hanged everywhere...  I grew-up like that, but it was such a long time ago, I don't even remember.  Had instant dry and unwrinkled close for over 40 years - don't wish to go back in time...  2,000 Ft sounds reasonable for getting all the laundry done. 

These are the kind of realities that one has to think about when planning a major move to a different culture.

Thanks so much for the details!

But the new washing machines are a lot better these days and as it's been stated they spin 2800rpm. The clothes are not wet, but damp maybe and dry in no time at all.

I forget what our machine is, but it has a high RPM and we have no problem in drying our clothes.

So if you buy a good brand with high RPM you will not have wet clothes hanging around.

klsallee :
zif :

Oh, I think all washing machines spin to a degree. But more expensive machines have stronger motors and spin faster. You can get a Zanussi with a 500rpm spin cycle. Or one that does 2800rpm. That's power!

500 is too slow. Our 12 year old LG 5 KG washer spin cycle goes up to 1000. And at that speed things are easy to hang dry. And If I remember correctly, it was only about 80,000 HUF at the time. Not expensive (IMHO).

That's not too bad, however, the more I find out, the more I think I will just use a laundromat - I heard (from Marilyn) that Bubbles is a chain in Budapest and I can do a week’s laundry and dry it for 2,000 Ft.  Now renting an apartment will have to depend of where Bubbles is located... 

I wonder if there is a service available in BP...  In the U.S. every dry cleaner offers laundry service.  You drop off a bag of laundry in the morning, and it is ready all clean and folded by the afternoon.  Was quite affordable...

SimCityAT :

So if you buy a good brand with high RPM you will not have wet clothes hanging around.

And, of course, part of the fun of being an expat is doing things the local way. ;)

Quite frankly, It was rather easy getting use to not having a dryer. But, yes, a good high speed RPM rinse on the washer makes that easier. :)

SimCityAT :

I forget what our machine is, but it has a high RPM and we have no problem in drying our clothes.

So if you buy a good brand with high RPM you will not have wet clothes hanging around.

I guess; I will find a place close to Bubbles (just in case); rent an apartment with a good washer; see about installing a dryer, and see how it goes.

Thank you so much for the information!

Also having a dryer, you will be burning more electricity, spending more money than is not necessary IMO. 

Use a laundromat, but if you are on the top floor of an apartment building do you wish to be lugging clothes up and down?

Panni36 :
SimCityAT :

I forget what our machine is, but it has a high RPM and we have no problem in drying our clothes.

So if you buy a good brand with high RPM you will not have wet clothes hanging around.

I guess; I will find a place close to Bubbles (just in case); rent an apartment with a good washer; see about installing a dryer, and see how it goes.

Thank you so much for the information!

In all honesty, I would rather look for a nice apartment in a nice area than being close to "Bubbles". That would be my priority, after all, you wish to be enjoying your retirement and taking it easy. ;)

klsallee :

And, of course, part of the fun of being an expat is doing things the local way. ;)

Quite frankly, It was rather easy getting use to not having a dryer. But, yes, a good high speed RPM rinse on the washer makes that easier. :)

I understand the sentiment...

I have lived in Australia for almost two years and spent three months in Fiji.  Had washer and dryer most of the time, but only a washer since December in the spacious 200 sq meter (2,100 SqFt) house I share just outside of Sydney with a friend. 

It is summer here, so I do not mind hanging the laundry outside in the large private garden we have, but in Budapest, I will be likely living in about a 50 sq meter space.  Being a neat freak, it would really bug me if I had to have drying clothes all over my living space.

In the long run buying a dryer would be cheaper then running to Bubbles every week.
Even with just one load and dry a week that would be nearly $65. a month at 2,000F a pop.
My husband took my cousin to Bubbles 2 summers ago.
He and his wife were doing a 3 week EU trip and wanted to wash in between.
Husband said it was pretty nice, I've only looked inside the place as we often pass by the area.
My poor cousins wife though, she had  some really nice fitting white jeans and he put them in with something red...
Bummer for her, hope she liked pink.

If you're doing detailed calculations on this, don't forget that commercial laundries tend to be a lot harder on your washing than DIY. Stuff'll probably wear out faster.

Marilyn Tassy :

In the long run buying a dryer would be cheaper then running to Bubbles every week.
Even with just one load and dry a week that would be nearly $65. a month at 2,000F a pop.

How so? 

2,000 Ft is only $8  -  that would average out to $35 per month....

Of course, the convenience of doing laundry at home is more appealing, but with all the issues of venting, electricity capacity and charges, I will have to evaluate what works best.

All this input helps a lot!  Thanks!

Panni36 :
Marilyn Tassy :

In the long run buying a dryer would be cheaper then running to Bubbles every week.
Even with just one load and dry a week that would be nearly $65. a month at 2,000F a pop.

How so? 

2,000 Ft is only $8  -  that would average out to $35 per month....

Of course, the convenience of doing laundry at home is more appealing, but with all the issues of venting, electricity capacity and charges, I will have to evaluate what works best.

All this input helps a lot!  Thanks!

True, guess I was thinking of not mixing the colors with the whites.
Unless of course you like pink panties.

Panni36 :

I will have to evaluate what works best.!

Absolutely. Get here, see how the land lays, then work out the details over time. Best idea.

Marilyn Tassy :

True, guess I was thinking of not mixing the colors with the whites.
Unless of course you like pink panties.

Almost everything I wear is black...  I like dark color bed sheets, but ONLY baige and cream towels.  The few things that are not dark and delicate, I wash by hand.  So, it is only the towels that need to be washed separately and I can do just one batch per month.

zif :

If you're doing detailed calculations on this, don't forget that commercial laundries tend to be a lot harder on your washing than DIY. Stuff'll probably wear out faster.

Hmm...  Did not think of that.  Why would that be?  I used to use the commercial service for a while in the U.S. and it was fine.

Who would have thought that "laundry" would be a HUGE consideration in moving my life to a new world...?    : ))

Panni36 :
zif :

If you're doing detailed calculations on this, don't forget that commercial laundries tend to be a lot harder on your washing than DIY. Stuff'll probably wear out faster.

Hmm...  Did not think of that.  Why would that be?  I used to use the commercial service for a while in the U.S. and it was fine.

Who would have thought that "laundry" would be a HUGE consideration in moving my life to a new world...?    : ))

But it really isn't?

" . . . don't forget that commercial laundries tend to be a lot harder on your washing than DIY."

"Why would that be?"

My understanding is that large commercial laundries push the wash through fast, to get the best use of their facilities. That means strong detergent, steaming hot water, fierce agitation and extraction, as well as very high heat on drying. That takes a toll on your clothes.

Of course laundries in Budapest may be different. Perhaps at Bubbles there's a roomful of elderly Hungarian ladies gently dunking your undies in the sink.

Hi everyone,

Please note that some posts ( flamming) have been removed from this thread.

Thank you,

Priscilla
Expat.com team  :cheers:

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