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crime rate in Guanajuato and SMA

Is anyone worried about the newest US. travel advisories to Mexico?  I read the travel warnings and became immediately concerned about the cartels in Michoacan State which is only 250 km from SMA.
Is there reason to believe the value of real estate will plummet due to cartels encroaching into GTO?
Guanajuato was assigned a level 2 advisory, increased caution. Normally I wouldn't be too concerned about a level 2, much of the US should be at this level.   However, I have noted a huge, recent increase in the crime rate in GTO plus it's next door to Michoacan.
Another problem is travel outside of Guanajuato. Who wants to be stuck not being able to travel to the coastal areas safely?
It  seems the Mexican government is unable to control the cartels.  What does this mean for property values in tourist areas such as SMA?

Here's the complete list.
Travel Advisory January 10, 2018 Mexico – Level 2: Exercise increased caution
Exercise increased caution in Mexico due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Violent crime, such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery, is widespread.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico as U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to these areas.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from intercity travel after dark in many areas of Mexico. U.S. government employees are also not permitted to drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico with the exception of daytime travel on Highway 15 between Nogales and Hermosillo.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

Do not travel to:

Colima state due to crime.
Guerrero state due to crime.
Michoacán state due to crime.
Sinaloa state due to crime.
Tamaulipas state due to crime.
For all other states in Mexico, please see detailed information below.

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving at night.
Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Mexico.
U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Aguascalientes state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling between cities at night. Additionally, U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Aguascalientes.

Baja California state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to the Baja California State Secretariat for Public Security, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents.

Due to poor cellular service and hazardous road conditions, U.S. government employees are only permitted to travel on “La Rumorosa” between Mexicali and Tijuana on the toll road during daylight.

There are no U.S. government restrictions in tourist areas in Baja California, which includes: Ensenada, Rosarito, and Tijuana.

Baja California Sur state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents.

There are no U.S. government restrictions for travel in Baja California Sur, which includes the tourist areas of Cabo San Lucas, San Jose del Cabo, and La Paz.

Campeche state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Chiapas state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation. U.S. government employees are permitted to drive during daylight only.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees in tourist areas in Chiapas state, such as: Palenque, San Cristobal de las Casas, and Tuxtla Gutierrez.

Chihuahua state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

Ciudad Juarez: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel after dark west of Eje Juan Gabriel and south of Boulevard Zaragoza. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the areas southeast of Boulevard Independencia and the Valle de Juarez region.
Within the city of Chihuahua: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the Morelos, Villa, and Zapata districts.
Ojinaga: U.S. government employees must travel via U.S. Highway 67 through the Presidio, Texas port-of-entry.
Palomas and the Nuevo Casas Grandes/Paquime region: U.S. government employees must use U.S. Highway 11 through the Columbus, New Mexico port-of- entry.
Nuevo Casas Grandes: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel outside city limits after dark.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Coahuila state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime is widespread. Local law enforcement has limited capability to prevent and respond to crime, particularly in the northern part of the state.

U.S. government employees are not permitted to travel in Coahuila state, with the exception of Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente. U.S. government employees can only travel to those cities using the most direct routes and maximizing the use of toll highways. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government employees must remain within Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, or Parras de la Fuente.

U.S. government employees are permitted to travel to Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuna but they must travel to these cities from the United States only.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Coahuila.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Colima state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to Tecoman or within 12 miles of the Colima-Michoacán border and on Route 110 between La Tecomaca and the Jalisco border.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees travel along Route 200 from the Jalisco border to Manzanillo, including the Manzanillo airport.  There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for stays in Manzanillo from Marina Puerto Santiago to Playa las Brisas.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Colima.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Durango state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity along the highways are common.

U.S. government employees may travel outside the city of Durango only during daylight on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government employees must remain within Durango city.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Durango.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Estado de Mexico state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime is common in parts of Estado de Mexico.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the following municipalities, unless they are traveling directly through the municipalities on major thoroughfares:

Coacalco
Ecatepec
Nezahualcoyotl
La Paz
Valle del Chalco
Solidaridad
Chalco
Ixtapaluca
Tlatlaya
U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on any roads between Morelos, Huitzilac, and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Guanajuato state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Guerrero state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the entire state of Guerrero, including Acapulco.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Hidalgo state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Jalisco state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to areas bordering Michoacán and Zacatecas states. U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling between cities after dark and from using Highway 80 between Cocula and La Huerta.

U.S. government employees may use federal toll road 15D for travel to Mexico City. However, they may not stop in the towns of La Barca or Ocotlan for any reason.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Jalisco.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for stays in the following tourist areas in Jalisco state: Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, Chapala, and Ajijic.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Mexico City – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Michoacán state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in Michoacán state, with the exception of Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas cities and the area north of federal toll road 15D.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel by land, except on federal toll road 15D.

U.S. government employees may fly into Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Morelos state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on any roads from Huitzilac to Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nayarit state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nayarit state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in most areas of the state, with the following exceptions:

Riviera Nayarit (which includes Nuevo Vallarta and Bahia de Banderas)
Santa Maria del Oro
Xalisco
When traveling to permitted areas above, U.S. government employees must use major highways and cannot travel between cities after dark.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Nayarit.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nuevo Leon state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nuevo Leon state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside Monterrey only during daylight on toll roads, with the exception of travel to the Monterrey airport, which is permitted at any time.

U.S. government employees must remain within San Pedro Garza Garcia or Santa Catarina (south of the Santa Catarina river) municipalities between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Nuevo Leon.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Oaxaca state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

In Oaxaca, U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on Highway 200 throughout the state, except to transit between the airport in Huatulco to hotels in Puerto Escondido and Huatulco.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the El Istmo region. The El Istmo region is defined by Highway 185D to the west, Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca/Chiapas border to the east and includes the towns of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas.

Puebla state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Queretaro state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Quintana Roo state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents injuring or killing bystanders have occurred.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for travel in Quintana Roo state, which includes tourist areas such as: Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Tulum, and the Riviera Maya.

San Luis Potosi state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of San Luis Potosi state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside San Luis Potosi city only during daylight hours on toll roads. U.S. government employees must remain within San Luis Potosi city between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in San Luis Potosi.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sinaloa state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based and operating in Sinaloa state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in most areas of the state. In areas where travel is permitted, the following restrictions are in place:
Mazatlan: U.S. government travel is permitted only in Zona Dorada, the historic town center, and direct routes to and from these locations and the airport or the cruise ship terminal.
Los Mochis and Port Topolobampo: U.S. government travel is permitted within the city and the port, as well as direct routes to and from these locations and the airport.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sonora state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Sonora is a key location utilized by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. However, northern Sonora experiences much lower levels of crime than cities closer to Sinaloa and other parts of Mexico. U.S. government employees visiting Puerto Peñasco must use the Lukeville/Sonoyta crossing, and they are required to travel during daylight hours on main roads.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to:

The triangular region west of Nogales, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar.
The eastern edge of the state of Sonora, which borders the state of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and state Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16).
South of Hermosillo, with the exception of the cities of Alamos, San Carlos, Guaymas, and Empalme.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Tabasco state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Tamaulipas state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion, and sexual assault, is common. Gang activity, including gun battles, is widespread. Armed criminal groups target public and private passenger buses traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers hostage and demanding ransom payments. Local law enforcement has limited capability to respond to violence in many parts of the state.

U.S. government employees are subject to movement restrictions and a curfew between midnight and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Tamaulipas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Tlaxcala state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Veracruz state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation. U.S. government employees are permitted to drive during daylight only.

Yucatan state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for travel in Yucatan state, which includes tourist areas such as: Chichen Itza, Merida, Uxmal, and Valladolid.

Zacatecas state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Zacatecas state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside Zacatecas city only during daylight hours on toll roads. U.S. government employees must remain within Zacatecas city between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Zacatecas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Travel Advisory Levels


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Hi to "katesparks and  all other members.

Security is important to all so the following link compares Puerto Vallarta to SMA in regards to crime. Hoping this can help anyone.

https://www.numbeo.com/crime/compare_ci … Comparison

Adios y buen dia a todos, GyC.

Here's comparasion between Queretaro and SMA.

https://www.numbeo.com/crime/compare_ci … Comparison

Adios otra vez, GyC.

Thanks for your reply.  These numbers seem to be taken from a survey and not statistics.  For those of you living in Los Frailles, is there more crime in Los Frailes compared to centro? I've read there is a higher incidence of home break-ins and robberies.  Does anyone have experience with this or know someone who has? What is the best way to protect against this?  The current owners aren't living in the house now but have someone looking after it.  The house doesn't look as though it's been vandalized but I have no idea if there has been a break in.  I'm concerned about the increasing crime rate in SMA.

It is a survey - and the profile of those answering the survey will vary from town to town. Guanajuato City hasn't seen an increase in crime.

Good  Afternoon  folks,

As  of  today  my wife and I are celebrating  our  30th day in SMA. We moved here from New York City where I was born and raised (Brooklyn specifically).  As  I  read  through all of the messages on security I can completely understand the concerns. However  I really feel  a sense  of fear  based on the messages and replies.  It is almost  as if everyone has lived in  zero  crime  community in the USA.  Why all  of the panic like messages?  I have been witness to daily crimes in New York City, gang violence in California  and worse  in  Russia  where my wife is from.  In our 30 days of living in SMA  we have seen  arguments  over  parking regulations,  disagreements between  police and drivers and some humorous  drunks on the benches of EL Jardin.  We have heard of some crimes from  other expats but nothing in comparison to what is currently happening daily in the USA.  We do not live  in the centro due  to expensive  rents in expat owned properties. So we live with the locals  and expats 15 minutes away.  SMA  does not deserve some of the negative  remarks  or  criticisms considering  where  we  all come from. We came here obviously  in  search  of  a better  life economically and otherwise. SMA can only get as good  as it gets if we  all help  to make it.  I  spend time listening  to many conversations  on the benches  of El Jardin  and  sometimes I am dismayed  at the criticisms leveled at the locals of SMA. We are guests here  and we should be more cordial and polite. I am here to stay permanently  simply because it makes sense economically  and  health wise. But I love the people  of SMA and respect their way of life. Crime or not,  SMA  is not as bad  as  some of you  have remarked. You  need to exercise caution in New York City, California and elsewhere. The same rules apply  here.    Play it safe here as you do in the USA where  crime is a daily occurrence.   I  love SMA and it is a great  place to settle and start a  new beginning.  Thank you  all  for listening.

I absolutely agree with what you as saying, Kolobog58.    SMA is not Reynosa or Acapulco and it is silly to act as if it somehow was.

What neighborhood do you live ?

I am have  now been living in Los Frailes,  SMA  for two months.  I feel safe here while taking  the ordinary  precautions  I took  while  living  for 30  years  in  PA. The  Mexican people I have come  in contact with have been  extraordinarily kind and helpful.  I'm  very happy to be living here in this beautiful city!  My  only real  fear  is  the Pipila  Glorieta  traffic circle which scares  the bejesus out of me!
Kate

I  live  on  Arroyo del Atascadero  near  La  Huerta hotel.  I  have  lived here  four and a half months and it is safer than my neighborhood  in  New York City.  The  people  of this community  are very friendly and  helpful.  Since  arriving  I  have  not seen  nor heard  of  any  crime issues  or community  problems.  It is very sad  that  many expats denigrate  San Miguel without really  knowing what is going on. It helps to get out and really get to know the community and not just sit all day  at  the jardin.  Go walk  during  the day and visit  the  other communities  and mercado's such as San  Juan de Dios.  It is far from my neighborhood but I go there to meet the locals.  Open  your hearts and minds to the community and disregard the  negative rumors of San Miguel. I left the US  because of the lack of understanding and  humanity.  I  now live here  in San Miguel and  the locals  have been absolutely supportive  and  accepting.   Please  accept  and  embrace  San Miguel de Allende  with  open  eyes and hearts.  Negativity is not the solution.

Hola.
I am not worried. We moved to SMA (historical centro) from the mission district of San Francisco.  I visit nyc relatively often.  So I bring a citified perspective to my new home. Gleaned from personal experience and the news, my awareness of USA crime and violence gives me the ability to look at the mx crime stats with a philosophical eye and a grain of salt.  The more impressive stories of violence are related to drug cartel business, a world almost entirely outside of mine. So if I get caught in an unlikely cross fire, que sera sera. I refuse to worry.  Regarding general safety, we have a burglar alarm in our house, the code for which we do not provide the maid (or by association, her entire familia).  We do not travel on roads (eg to/from airports) in the dark.  I no longer carry my cellphone tantalizingly in my back pocket (live n learn), and we make an effort to walk with confidence and presentness.  I understand how those stats and warnings are off putting to folks. Mexico, like nyc and SF and Chicago and Detroit and Dallas, isn’t for everyone.  Feeling safe is important and comfort levels are personal, varied and always valid.  It’s kind of like investment risk tolerance. We have to be able to sleep at night and what the guy next door thinks or feels is irrelevant.
Leslie

I  am  sorry  that  as  the  guy  next  door,   my  comments  are  irrelevant.  I  am  only  trying  to  provide  a  level balance  of  honesty  and  transparency.  I   was  born and raised  in New York City  only  to be attacked because  of  the color of my skin.  it is  why  I came  to San Miguel,  here no cares whether you are black or white.  Considering  my comments are irrelevant,  I wish  you  a  good future  in  my community.

Hey
I have been following real estate in the upper end in
San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato for about 5 years.
Whatever the truth is about crime is not relevant.  Its
The perception that is driving down the upper end.
Google, Cieneguita Hacienda Las Palmas 2, San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato,. And see the reality.  There have been very few sales in the upper end in the last couple years.  The problem with investng when there is blood  in the streets is that there is blood  in the streets (real or imagined).  Wealthy people especially as the age want security  as they are less able to navigate difficult situations.  I love San Miguel but cannot afford the downside risk at This point in my life.

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