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Temporary residency of up to 5 years.

Is a police background check required?

Good question, I honestly do not know but they are in contact with the embassy  of your home country before issuing a resident permit so if your on the most wanted list, I suppose they know how to find you.
No, I don't think it's that serious, believe me I know some peeps here that really do belong behind bars and they are running around scot free.
If you have any active warrants out on you, then that could be a issue.
Anything free and clear in your past shouldn't hold you back.
If they held your past against you then many people wouldn't be allowed to travel anywhere.
In the 1970's when my husband escaped HU for the US he was held in a camp for nearly one year while they did background checks on him. These days it seems you don't even have to give your real name or age to go west.

Thank You.

Welcome, not trying to be a silly but I really don't know how they go about doing checks these days.
I suppose if you have all the papers they ask for and everything adds up, you will be fine.

Technically, no.

If coming as a family member of an EEA citizen, what you will need to have or prove is listed here (and it is all in English, very detailed and should answer all your questions):

http://www.bmbah.hu/index.php?option=co … mp;lang=en

In short:

-present travel documents (i.e. passport -- might need to be valid for at least 3 months longer than the intended period of stay);
-verify the family relationship;
-prove accommodation;
-prove sufficient financial resources; and
-prove health insurance coverage.

Marilyn Tassy :

If you have any active warrants out on you, then that could be a issue.

Active foreign warrants can still be served on non-EEA residents in any EU state, and that person can certainly be extradited back to their home country. EU residency is not a get out of jail free card. ;)

Not to go off topic but when we lived in Hilo Hawaii 20 some years back I could of sworn America's Most Wanted just needed to round up 25% of the population and their show would be canceled.
Never know who is living out in the woods...Or rain forests.

Marilyn Tassy :

Never know who is living out in the woods...Or rain forests.

I first moved to Switzerland (years ago -- just at the turn of the century). I had to get a police background check from the USA as part of my family unification residency request. I think having to provide such documentation is not unreasonable (and for me, it was easy to get). But it is not required by EU law (and of course Switzerland is not in the EU, so it can do what it wants). And I can think of a few understandable arguments why it is not officially requested here.

But.... was at the immigration office this week, and two people next to me had constantly shifting stories about their application. And the person at the counter said, out loud, that the photo they provided for the residency card did not match the photo in the passport supplied. Then came the excuse train from the applicants, with more and increasing irregularities after that. One was instant-messaging on their phone (even though there was a "no cell phone" sign) and giving answers apparently supplied by someone not in the office. But I had finished my business before they did and left so do not know how that turned out.

Wow that is a disturbing story.
I wonder what country they entered HU from.
Some people have more nerve then brains.
Good luck though with immigration and the 10 year renewal papers. Ever think about trying for HU citizenship?
My cuz is moving back to the US in about 2 months time after living in the Philippines for around 10 years. His wife is a local, took him a year to get her a visa to enter the US so they are acting before anything happens.
I thought he was happy over there but obviously it wasn't what he expected in the long run.
He mentioned in the past that he needed a new visa to stay there every year even though is is married to a local and not working over there.
Afraid he will be in shock when seeing the prices now in the US after being gone for so long.
I know last year he found himself in the hospital over there and silly him, not sure how or why he didn't have health coverage over there but he didn't.
They were literally holding him hostage for over a week demanding he pay $14,000 in cash. He was asking family for funds but forget it, no one is that wealthy to just hand over money knowing he will never repay them.
They finally let him out without payment I suppose.
I will be interested to know more about what's going on with him and why he has left that country.

Marilyn Tassy :

I wonder what country they entered HU from.

I know. But I will just say the passport provided was from an "EU membership application country".

But, again, "the photos did not match".... Work that one out.

And the person was applying for residency based on claimed labor skilled based on a recent Hungarian law encouraging immigration based on such specific work skills. Might be government poking itself in the eye because of unseen options for loopholes, fraud, etc. (and if so, very ironic given government rhetoric about "some types" of immigrants). But I say "might". Like I said, I do not have the whole story so I can draw no final conclusions. But, it was all very interesting. And, yes, a little disturbing too.

There's an interesting side story to this kind of thing in the UK which might apply across Europe if and when (and it's likely) it comes up in the ECHR.

Lying to obtain citizenship does not mean deportation

The gist of the story is that using a false identity, rather than impersonating someone else, meant that there was no way to deport them - possibly by bad phrasing in the law (i.e. identity theft different to false identity). 

Paraphrasing the judge, "They had not stolen a person’s identity but instead made up a fictional character, neither appellant pretended to be someone he was not”.

So the characters in the immigration office (at least in the UK) would be better off making up their identity and claiming to be refugees instead of trying to impersonate someone else.

fluffy2560 :

There's an interesting side story to this kind of thing in the UK which might apply across Europe if and when (and it's likely) it comes up in the ECHR.

Lying to obtain citizenship does not mean deportation

From above article:

In effect, because they had not stolen a person’s identity but instead made up a fictional character, “neither appellant pretended to be someone he was not”.

Hu? I am of course not a lawyer, but that does not make sense. I am really Jack Smith. But put on a form I am John Doe, why am I not pretending to be John Doe just because I "made it up"? Again, IANAL, but to me that does not sound like a loophole, just a bizarre interpretation of the law by a judge simply because the law (to him) was not exact, rigid, and crystal clear. I have no problem with judicial interpretation of laws, and one must be careful creating exact and rigid laws. Or impinging on the judiciary simply because a judge makes an unpopular decision. But laws often need some "wiggle room" to allows some judicial discretion in individual cases. Yet cases like this can make that "human element" more difficult if hard legislation is passed as a counter measure to judicial opinion.

klsallee :
fluffy2560 :

There's an interesting side story to this kind of thing in the UK which might apply across Europe if and when (and it's likely) it comes up in the ECHR.

Lying to obtain citizenship does not mean deportation

From above article:

In effect, because they had not stolen a person’s identity but instead made up a fictional character, “neither appellant pretended to be someone he was not”.

Hu? I am of course not a lawyer, but that does not make sense. I am really Jack Smith. But put on a form I am John Doe, why am I not pretending to be John Doe just because I "made it up"? Again, IANAL, but to me that does not sound like a loophole, just a bizarre interpretation of the law by a judge.

I think it does make perfect sense. 

It basically says there were no grounds to deport or remove citizenship as they had not used identity theft.   There was no John Doe. You're not pretending to be John Doe.  As far as you are concerned, you ARE John Doe.

The "illegal" basis of whatever followed - obtaining this and that from identity theft - did not exist.  The legal flowchart ended nowhere as there's no identity theft.  No-one has had their identity stolen.

I should say in the UK, you can call yourself anything you want.  This happens quite often - for example if the relatives of a serial killer had the same name, they could change their names without much hassle. There is no person registration and no central system for recording the identity of anyone. 

I can change my name now if I wanted.  If I wanted to make it more serious, I could just go to a UK lawyer, swear an oath and obtain a paper called a Deed Poll which says I now wish to be known as Brangeline Pitt.  But I could also do that at home with some witnesses.  With that, I can obtain a new passport and driving licence etc.

Sounds insane but I have known a couple of Hungarians in the past that actually had a couple of different ID's!! This was in the US.
Dam, I was so freaked out when I found that out I was wondering if they were actually spies!
Don't laugh but we Americans usually do take people at face value, sort  of our charm and also our stupidity.

Marilyn Tassy :

Sounds insane but I have known a couple of Hungarians in the past that actually had a couple of different ID's!! This was in the US.
Dam, I was so freaked out when I found that out I was wondering if they were actually spies!
Don't laugh but we Americans usually do take people at face value, sort  of our charm and also our stupidity.

I don't think it's such an unusual case.   

I saw a couple of short news reports about that kind of thing. 

There was some Syrian guy - with a fake Czech passport catching an Easyjet plane from  Paris to London and making it all the way through on a 2nd attempt.   You can watch it here: Passport to UK

I also saw another one where a woman made it all the way to Sweden - without documentation. See here:  Heading for Gothenberg

These are older documentaries before Hungarian fence went up but of course, the guy with the made up passport already made it into the EU and just had to make that last hop.

In both cases, they were pretty smart and very Western, possibly southern European looking people and spoke good English - more than enough to bluff their way past airport/ferry/train staff.

fluffy2560 :

I think it does make perfect sense. 
....
I should say in the UK, you can call yourself anything you want.  This happens quite often - for example if the relatives of a serial killer had the same name, they could change their names without much hassle. There is no person registration and no central system for recording the identity of anyone. 

I can change my name now if I wanted.  If I wanted to make it more serious, I could just go to a UK lawyer, swear an oath and obtain a paper called a Deed Poll which says I now wish to be known as Brangeline Pitt.  But I could also do that at home with some witnesses.  With that, I can obtain a new passport and driving licence etc.

Thanks for the explanation. Different country and laws than I am use to.

You have to go to court to legally change your name in the USA. And the court can actually deny your choice of name. For example, you need your federal ID (Social Security Number) to get a job (to avoid tax fraud) and your name is tied to that number. That is what I am use to. So this all sounds just bizarre to me to do a name change at home and get a new passport. Would never work in USA (because your name is tied to your birth certificate and it won't matter at all if you and witnesses decided your name is now Brangeline Pitt -- you will not get a new passport using that name). And even using a made up name, and signing a document "under penalty of perjury" is quite illegal in the States. Federal law. Lot of possible fines and prison time for trying that. In effect, any official interaction with government requires your "legal" name.

fluffy2560 :

There was some Syrian guy - with a fake Czech passport catching an Easyjet plane from  Paris to London and making it all the way through on a 2nd attempt.

Well, airport passport control in Europe I always thought was pretty much a joke most of the time. Immigration just glanced at it, then handed it back. A reasonably good false passport I could see would be easy to get accepted under such perfunctory inspection.

Which is great for processing people and easing their travel. Not so great for immigration "control". The USA did it that way too. About two or three decades ago.

Then there is the current USA. Immigration really processes your passport. And you too. Annoying. Slow. But in theory at least, a real "control" of the documents (if one cares about such things).

It's true, we legally changed our son's surname when he was 2 years old.
My husband and I were not legally married when our son was born and although at the time we didn't see getting a piece of paper to prove we were a family as a big deal, I stuck to my guns and didn't give our son his father's surname until we were married.
I suppose I was a contradiction, didn't care about it being legal but also didn't want to give any "honor" to my husband's surname until we were married legally. Stubborn I suppose.My way of protecting my child, never know if not married if it will last long or not, why confuse him with a name of a stranger from the past unless we were married.Father's can come and go but mom's are for ever...
When we married legally first thing I did was apply for a name change for our son, had to place adds in 3 newspapers before the court date in case anyone objected, legally posted for the world to see.
Had to bring in my son to court with me and tell the judge why we wanted a name change. Very serious procedure in the states to change ones name legally.
Had to have everything filed with the courthouse and the clerks at city hall. All on file, even had to contact SS and let them know about the name change. Also had to pay for court time etc.
Passport control in the EU isn't fun but it is nothing like the once over you get in the US when entering.
At least in the EU we don't have to run around in our stocking feet.
My bro and SIL both work as mechanics for a major US airline. Both have over 30 years in.
My bro has a high level security clearance but they stop him all the time and give him the once over before he can enter certain areas. He is often alone on the plane in the cockpit, he moves the planes around the tarmac.
He basically refuses to fly on vacation anywhere because he just can't stand yet move checks.
I can understand his feelings, when I worked in casinos the last place I wanted to go to on my vacation was a casino.

klsallee :
fluffy2560 :

I think it does make perfect sense. 
....
I should say in the UK, you can call yourself anything you want.  This happens quite often - for example if the relatives of a serial killer had the same name, they could change their names without much hassle. There is no person registration and no central system for recording the identity of anyone. 

I can change my name now if I wanted.  If I wanted to make it more serious, I could just go to a UK lawyer, swear an oath and obtain a paper called a Deed Poll which says I now wish to be known as Brangeline Pitt.  But I could also do that at home with some witnesses.  With that, I can obtain a new passport and driving licence etc.

Thanks for the explanation. Different country and laws than I am use to.

You have to go to court to legally change your name in the USA. And the court can actually deny your choice of name. For example, you need your federal ID (Social Security Number) to get a job (to avoid tax fraud) and your name is tied to that number. That is what I am use to. So this all sounds just bizarre to me to do a name change at home and get a new passport. Would never work in USA (because your name is tied to your birth certificate and it won't matter at all if you and witnesses decided your name is now Brangeline Pitt -- you will not get a new passport using that name). And even using a made up name, and signing a document "under penalty of perjury" is quite illegal in the States. Federal law. Lot of possible fines and prison time for trying that. In effect, any official interaction with government requires your "legal" name.

Birth certificate is another thing and so is your SS (or as we call it, NI number).   

If I remember correctly, you can just apply for another NI number with the correct explanations or keep your old one.  One might want a different NI number because it's traceable to an employer payroll - for example if avoiding an abusive partner.   

We also have driving licence numbers and these can stay the same if you want it.  it's long been the case that getting a new birth certificate was more difficult. 

However, this is quite possible in one way to get all new documentation including birth certificate - "just" change gender.  Then you can have a new birth certificate, DL number (this encodes for gender so would have to change) and NI number (think this encodes for gender too).  All perfectly legal and supported. 

Another oddity which surprises people is that in the UK is that we can have two passports, both perfectly valid at the same time - different numbers of course, but same details. But doesn't have to be the same photo - could be you with differently styled hair etc.  But both usable and valid for different dates (as the application maybe done at different times).  To get one all you need is a letter from your employer requesting you be provided with a second passport to facilitate overseas business.

*edit: NI does not encode for gender but DL number does.

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