Raising kids in India

Hello everyone,

How is raising kids in India different from raising kids in your home country?

What are the activities that your kids seem to enjoy the most in India?

Do you feel that the country is "family-friendly"?

Do you recommend India as a good place to raise kids? Why or why not?

Thank you for sharing your experience.

Priscilla

Hi Priscilla,

Are you an Indian? India is a country of vast culture which you don"t find in most of the cultures around the world. My kids were born in Australia and we moved to India in 2015, and they joined the same school  studied. I keep asking them, lets go back to Australia, and they say they would never leave India due to its people's love a caring nature. So its how you want your kids to grow.

Thanks and Regards
Maneesh Awasthi

The experience has not been too pleasant as Indian society itself is divided into so many fractions by religion, region, language, caste, creed, class, income group, etc. that they themselves don't get along well among themselves and divided so so many groups and subgroups.

I have experienced so much issues between south Indians and north Indians, among Hindus and Muslims and Christians, among vegetarians and non-vegetarian eaters, among people from north east states of India and people from rest of India .... the list is too long and many are unknown to me. If you happen to look different by your skin color, look, hair color, features, language, social habits .... you feel yourself isolated unless you are able to handle the lives of yours and your family in independent way and being self dependent within yourselves.   

It is not too easy for expats and their families to socialize and mix within the general Indian community unless you find people from your own countries or lucky to meet some global Indians where you live. You may not face too much or problem at the workplace but challenges are when you try to mix socially as the society has many pre-determined and fixed mindsets about good, bad, ugly about people who do not belong to their group, culture, religion, region while foreigners find it far more difficult to mingle with major part of the society, and unfortunately, in last few years this had gone bad to worse.

In India, people rent you houses based on your religion, food habits, social status and practices. Now often often you are told what should you eat, how should you dress, who should visit you and who shouldn't and so on which were not the norms a few years back.

As an expat, you and your family face issues from food habits to procuring your preferred food as they are available in limited varieties in specific cities which you will not find across the country and not in each and every large city so your location plays a major role to your lives in India. You will find difficulties in eating out as except five star hotels you will hardly find food that has control on oil, spices and chillies which hardly most expats will be able to handle. In five star hotels, there are limitations in terms of varieties and prices are not something one can afford to eat too often.

Your problems will begin when your kids will ask for an authentic hamburger or a typical hotdog which you won't find even in international QSR chains like McDonald's or KFC or Burger King as their menus are absolutely different and so are the taste and service.

You have to extremely adaptive and patient if you are not in a foreign diplomatic mission and going to live in India with your family, then do not expect much and be satisfied with what you get.

These issues exist for any expat across the world who has to adapt to the host country and its culture. It is only normal to find Indian food in India. India is called a subcontinent due to the diversity in its cultures. The best part is that India works and functions well as a nation despite its immense diversity.
India can be a paradise for those who embrace its diversity while a nightmare for those who shun its diversity.

Caste is a reality of life in India just as white privilege is in the Western world. The West has its own caste system with whites at top of the pyramid.
My European friends absolutely love the diversity in Indian vegetarian food. India can be equally good and bad depending upon how you view it.

Thanks for your view as an Indian but it is like pushing someone to adopt to Indian culture, food, lifestyle which should not be the objective in expat forum.

You are Indian who lived overseas for a while and you have returned to India with your young kids which is different from an expat who is moving to India due to work related matter and for whom the matter is not the same as it is for you and your kids.

Let us guide the expats with real problems and issues they will face when they start living in India which you will not face as an Indian.

I also do not see any reason to claim India is a place full with 'love and care' while the real story is different. Why should we give false promises and over glorified picture about the country that often put us on shame to rest of the world.

Let us be practical as being patriots and being true to ourselves and others.

I am not Indian but of Indian origin and I do not have any kids. I wonder what makes you think that.
I speak as an expat. I feel at home with the country that India is, more so because my family has mixed roots part of which are Indian.

Every country can be equally good or bad. India has its pros and cons. Imagine Hindus who are vegetarian and land up in a country where meat, beef and pork are consumed as staple. They would have a tough time adapting to the food and culture but eventually they will find ways to survive even as vegetarians.

tough
raising babies in india is barbaric.
dont do that to babies
or use birth control staff.

Hi everyone,

We are slightly going off topic. Let's focus on the initial post :

Priscilla :

Hello everyone,

How is raising kids in India different from raising kids in your home country?

What are the activities that your kids seem to enjoy the most in India?

Do you feel that the country is "family-friendly"?

Do you recommend India as a good place to raise kids? Why or why not?

Thank you for sharing your experience.

Priscilla

Thank you

Chris
Expat.com

New topic