Close

Do and don't in Croatia


Are you living in Croatia? We need you to share your experience of the local customs :)

Is it difficult to adjust to the local customs in Croatia?

Could you please share with us a list of the do's and don't's in Croatia?

Thanks!

Hi!

Croatia is warm harted country so you can do here anything you want!
It is not difficult to adjust on the local customs, it is similar as in other European countries.

Best regards!

Hi and welcome on board janaumag!

Thanks for your input ;)

Regards
Armand

If you happen to visit Serbia and buy a t-shirt there, you might be told not to wear it in Dalmatia (it's happened to me)

If you're gay, it's probably best to hide it. Maybe this is not a big issue in Zagreb, but it still is in Split.

my dream is to visit Croatia this year :)

don moe - definitely try to get there before it potentially joins the EU bloc :)

DO  take summer siestas

DO be aware of the national holidays, some of which are Roman Catholic holidays, and make a note of what might be closed near you

Asking someone to meet for a drink means you pay, being asked means the other person does.

DON'T turn away home-made rakija or wine. I have tried some very unusual types of rakija made from ultra-local herbs and plants, and have never regretted trying them all.

DO try to buy local olive oil from a small greenmarket or vočarna,  never the bottles in shops or supermarkets.

tinica :

don moe - definitely try to get there before it potentially joins the EU bloc :)

what's the difference?
but by any way i must visit soooooooooooooooon ;)

tinica :

DO  take summer siestas

DO be aware of the national holidays, some of which are Roman Catholic holidays, and make a note of what might be closed near you

Asking someone to meet for a drink means you pay, being asked means the other person does.

DON'T turn away home-made rakija or wine. I have tried some very unusual types of rakija made from ultra-local herbs and plants, and have never regretted trying them all.

DO try to buy local olive oil from a small greenmarket or vočarna,  never the bottles in shops or supermarkets.

well said :one

Hi.
I live in Croatia, I have lived in Split, and actually I loved it there, because there are always bad people and good people. And I now live in Zagreb, I like Zagreb, but it is nothing like Split, or maybe any other city around the World. :)

Croatia is really nice, we have lots of values, and there is a lot o sightseeing when you visit us, so be free to come and enjoy yourselves, and please don't judge all of the people in Split, or Croatia. :)

tinica :

If you happen to visit Serbia and buy a t-shirt there, you might be told not to wear it in Dalmatia (it's happened to me)

If you're gay, it's probably best to hide it. Maybe this is not a big issue in Zagreb, but it still is in Split.

Well, as I just wrote in my post, I lived in Split, and there I made lifelong friends, there are great people there, and there are bad people there, but isn't it like that in every city, or every country? :)

don moe :

i adore Croatia

Have you ever been ? Or are you just planing to come ? :D

NYC lover :
don moe :

i adore Croatia

Have you ever been ? Or are you just planning to come ? :D

am planing to come this year as i adore it from the photos i see plus tv programs plus the culture too :)

don moe :
tinica :

don moe - definitely try to get there before it potentially joins the EU bloc :)

what's the difference?
but by any way i must visit soooooooooooooooon ;)

It actually does matter if you visit before or after Croatia (possibly) joins the EU, because prices will go up in the country and it will no longer be cheaper to stay in Croatia than any other EU country.

steffe :
don moe :
tinica :

don moe - definitely try to get there before it potentially joins the EU bloc :)

what's the difference?
but by any way i must visit soooooooooooooooon ;)

It actually does matter if you visit before or after Croatia (possibly) joins the EU, because prices will go up in the country and it will no longer be cheaper to stay in Croatia than any other EU country.

really am grateful for your sharing,as i didn't notice that it can make a difference when Croatia joins the EU,now i must make my papers soon and take a nice vacation before joining the EU.
thanks so much for your great support and help :)

To people planning to visit Croatia (right you are), there is no reason to be afraid of prices going up after joining the EU.
Already shopping is about as " expensive" as in any other country, and increase of "foreign" competition will reduce prices instead of push them up.
For instance: Lidl, the German retailer is on the market, and their price/quality level is promising for the future.
As goes for Baumax, Bauhaus, Bricostore, C&A, DM and many others.
Simply said: When competition enters a free EU-Croatian market, prices will go DOWN, not UP.
Real estate already is expensive, when you want to live first row at the sea under the palmtrees, which is totally normal.
Dining out will stay fairly cheap depending on your choise), local farmers and winegrowers will keep offering excellent goods at low prices.
So what to worry, it's a great country, and it will be a lot better when membership of the EU finishes those high (protective) import taxes !!!
P.S. we live there, and I can recommend a visit to anybody !!!!

I live na Šolti half the year, and have traveled all over Jugo countries since the 1980s - the late Jugoslav era. I can say that in the 6 years since I bought my island property, it's not that the prices at markets are going up - but currency conversion rates have. Long gone are the days of almost 7 hrk to the US$.

I realize that the kuna is linked to the euro, and not the dollar, but my Slovenian friends all wish their country never joined the Euro zone and kept the tolar. Because the prices did go up.

Of course, joining the EU and joining the Euro zone are separate matters.

I would always, without hesitation, recommend a visit to anybody. I love it, too, which is why I have a parcel I am building on in Croatia and nowhere else!:):)

tinica :

I live na Šolti half the year, and have traveled all over Jugo countries since the 1980s - the late Jugoslav era. I can say that in the 6 years since I bought my island property, it's not that the prices at markets are going up - but currency conversion rates have. Long gone are the days of almost 7 hrk to the US$.

I realize that the kuna is linked to the euro, and not the dollar, but my Slovenian friends all wish their country never joined the Euro zone and kept the tolar. Because the prices did go up.

Of course, joining the EU and joining the Euro zone are separate matters.

I would always, without hesitation, recommend a visit to anybody. I love it, too, which is why I have a parcel I am building on in Croatia and nowhere else!:):)

Thanks so much for your great information and giving me more reasons to go :)

I have friends from Cairo who frequently visit Split, too. (He's Croatian, she's Austrian, the kid is growing up in Cairo, completely international :) )

It's the most beautiful country I've ever visited.  It's impossible to be disappointed. Enjoy!

tinica :

I have friends from Cairo who frequently visit Split, too. (He's Croatian, she's Austrian, the kid is growing up in Cairo, completely international :) )

It's the most beautiful country I've ever visited.  It's impossible to be disappointed. Enjoy!

Wow what an international family :D
Now u r giving me more reasons to come for a nice trip :)

Some do and dont's in Croatia:

drinking and driving;
no alcohol while driving(but if every drinking driver gave me one kuna, I would be wealthy soon).

dogs on the beach;
there are some beaches where dogs are allowed, mostly however not (forbidden), or rather not, as Croats love their clean sea.

(machine) noise on sunday;
if you are a hobby carpenter or need to cut the grass, do that on any day except on sunday as Croats like to enjoy that one day of the week relaxing with friends and family.

drop your garbage anywhere;
still Croats have that nasty habit, especially in nature, but perhaps our good example will get followers.

driving on a summerday after an occasional rainshower;
if in summer a rainshower wets the roads, BE AWARE !!!!!, as the asphalt surface shows like turkish wrestlers, so slipping and sliding truly is a BIG risk.

if going for a hike, be aware that water is hardly found and the sun can be very hot, so be prepared, take one liter per person at LEAST !!!

i`m sorry i have question people are familiar with english or like french people ??

aah where can i learn hrvatski ?

Hi Mostafa samy,

You are a bit off topic. The title of this thread is Do and don't in Croatia.

Could you please start a new discussion on the Croatia forum. Thank you.

ok Christine thank you

Don't wear socks with sandals :D

ernest83 :

Don't wear socks with sandals :D

u hurt lots of croatian farmer feeling bro :D

FOR me there are nothing is don`t do in Croatia after i saw many ppl pie and take dumb in the street :D However if u live in Zagreb half of Zagreb ppl collect cans from street if ur smoker u will know new person from Croatia every day they will stop you always to ask you for smoke :D

Also don't use shower gel when showering at the beach and shower with your sandals on. You don't know what kind of foot bacteria guy before you left there.

Best time for the beach is in the morning up till noon and later on after 6 PM. It's not overcrowded and you won't look like a crab after your first day :D

If you are going for night swimming don't stray too far off the beach so your friends can hear you, if they can't see you. You should take hoodie with you cos you will start freezing around 4-5 AM, even if it was 30 degrees during the night.

As a person who is married to a Croat and lived here for 2years my advice DO NOT MOVE HERE.

tinica :

If you happen to visit Serbia and buy a t-shirt there, you might be told not to wear it in Dalmatia (it's happened to me)

If you're gay, it's probably best to hide it. Maybe this is not a big issue in Zagreb, but it still is in Split.

it is not an issue...it is respect and know what is polite to do or not,, Nobody will kill you if you're wearing the shirt.. But would you wear the Chinese shirt in Lassa(Tibet)??
If you are tourist who just pass the Croatia from Serbia that is OK.. If you want to adjust and spend time with the local people, it is about the culture..
I will not wear Irish or Scottish shirt going in pub with English friends as well..Nor I will wear Russian shirt going in pub with Belarus friends..
It it just about  being polite and think a bit ...

(moderated: off topic)

trustno1 :
tinica :

If you happen to visit Serbia and buy a t-shirt there, you might be told not to wear it in Dalmatia (it's happened to me)

If you're gay, it's probably best to hide it. Maybe this is not a big issue in Zagreb, but it still is in Split.

it is not an issue...it is respect and know what is polite to do or not,, Nobody will kill you if you're wearing the shirt.. But would you wear the Chinese shirt in Lassa(Tibet)??
If you are tourist who just pass the Croatia from Serbia that is OK.. If you want to adjust and spend time with the local people, it is about the culture..
I will not wear Irish or Scottish shirt going in pub with English friends as well..Nor I will wear Russian shirt going in pub with Belarus friends..
It it just about  being polite and think a bit ...

As someone who has traveled in Croatia and Serbia since the Jugoslav days, and bought property in Croatia - I generally abide by the etiquette of my elders, who don't have the problem with their national neighbors that the younger post-Ju generation seems to have. That it might be considered impolite to wear a t-shirt from another country was my point, even though I find that baffling. Personally, I'm offended by ustaša graffiti and swastikas. I have worn the šahovnica in Belgrade without problem. And worst of all, I'm Jenki!

I have English friends who wear shirts from Scotland and Ireland. Are they impolite?

Your response to me simply proves why I was correct in my advice of something Not to do in Croatia.

I live in Croatia,Zagreb and i don't like it, too many nationalists,football hooligans,whatever you do don't go to Split.

It's really a shame about Split - I love Palača Dioklecijanova, Jadransko More, and otoci - but the nationalism of Hajduk hooligans in the city is awful. And they are everywhere, not only in Poljud. :(

Hello all. I have just returned from a week in Hvar, Split and Dubrovnik.  Such a lovely country. I can't believe I haven't been there before. I will be returning!

New topic

Expatriate health insurance in Croatia

Free advice and quotation service to choose an expat health insurance in Croatia

Moving to Croatia

Find tips from professionals about moving to Croatia

Travel insurance in Croatia

Enjoy stress-free travel to Croatia

Flights to Croatia

Find the best prices for your flight tickets to Croatia

2 million members!

Watch later