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New to Kathmandu

Hello, My name is Kristin Agrawal.  I am an American from Tulsa, Oklahoma with two daughters 14 and 10.  My husband is a Nepali born citizen currently living with us in the US.  I'm looking for answers to a  few questions. I am relocating to Kathmandu next month, last week of November and my husband has not been back home in 20 years so he isn't much help ;)
I have three dogs we are bringing with us. All are smaller indoor animals.  I was told the move will be to hard on them. I'm looking at using Pet shipping company Jet Setter for the transport so I believe that piece of it will be fine.  My in-laws say they are concerned the dogs will not adjust well to the climate, elevation and pollution.  Is this something I should be concerned about? I'm hoping they are just overly concerned and don't realize we take very good care of our pets and they are family so we will not ignore any symptoms of trouble.
  I am looking for an English School, possibly a Christian school but if not at least and English school as we do not yet know the language but are working aggressively to learn. Can anyone make suggestions?
Also, is it difficult for an American female to work in Nepal.  My husband says I dont need to work... but I have always worked in healthcare sales and marketing.  He mentioned working at the embassy but I know nothing of that nature so I feel that will be difficult.
Finally, are there any items that you may suggest I bring with me from the States at time of relocation?
I am excited for the next three years of this amazing journey.
Best Regards,
Kristin Agrawal

Hi Kristin, as far as the dogs go, they will be fine.  There are many good vets around town if they become distressed or ill.  Though I doubt they will.  We lived in Broken Arrow and moved to western Colorado (same elevation as Kathmandu) and our dogs were perfectly fine.  There are tons of people around the city who have brought their dogs with them from overseas and all are fine.
For the kids and their school, KISC used to be a Christian school, they are a little less so now tho, for some reason.  It's a bit expensive for the tuition there, if you are a missionary you can apply for a scholarship.  There are a few international schools which are not Christian but pretty good.  My wife is part of a home school co-op where moms coordinate meetups for the home school kids and plan activities.  You  can find it on facebook. 
I think you could find work easily enough, perhaps at one of the schools, or a private hospital.  All things are possible.
I don't think you need to bring anything.  the only things we've found difficult to buy is Dr. Pepper, root beer, and affordable quality toys for the kids.  You can find many of the same brand of toys sold in the US, but at a higher price due to import taxes.

I FOUND DR. PEPPER! First The Lazy Gringo restaurant (not bad) has it and they can also tell you where they get their stash. Boy if I knew then what I know now, however, I would have bypassed Nepal by 4000 miles.

I thought I already answred this re your dogs, but climate and elevation; if they can't adjust to this perfect climate, then hundreds of thousands of dogs would die every time someone took their dog to Denver, Colorado. Don't listen to people here; they don't know anything and most expats don't...save the ones on here...of course. As an FYI, the dogs on the aircraft will be pressurized to 9000' when en route, so don't listen to 'any' Nepali. Thousands of dogs fly every day and maybe one dies a week out of thousands and usually because some moron didn't provide water and they die of dehydration.

It's not impossible to find, but the price is a bit prohibitive for a soft drink...  I found root beer at either Saleway or Big Mart and it was like 200 rupees for 6oz

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