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What to expect when moving to Hungary

Hello everyone,

Is there anything you wish you had known before moving to Hungary? For example, transportation, internet speeds, types of housing, aspects of the culture or social life.

In your opinion, what's the most important thing to know about Hungary?

When would you recommend someone should begin planning their move to Hungary?

What were the most helpful ways you found to get organised? For example, did you use a checklist, were there any particularly useful websites or apps?

What advice would you give to future expats preparing to move to Hungary?

Thank you for sharing your experience.

Priscilla

I came to Hungary for the first time in 1994 intending to work on job there for 1 year.  And now it's 2017. Admittedly I haven't been in HU all that time, I've been other places too but I'm now attached to Hungary (actually specific Hungarians) by a giant elastic band - I always bounce back. 

So the major thing is that ones comes HU single, you're unlikely to leave the place single.  So the plan should be to include a spouse in your departure plans even if you didn't think such a thing would happen. No research, no web sites, no apps. You'll get hooked up without even trying such are the considerable and subtle charms of the Hungarians.

Oh and btw, in case anyone doesn't know, I'm obviously considerably biased.

I wish I had known about the ragweed regulations, as I would not have bought a place with so much land. If I had known UK was going to leave the EU I would not have moved to Hungary anyway. It amazes me that Brits are still moving to EU countries.

My main advice to those considering the move is to start learning the language as soon as possible. When you come to look for housing or whatever, try to practice your Hungarian as much as you can. If your pronunciation is not near to perfect, Hungarians might not even realise you are trying to speak Hungarian!

What are thoughts about renting versus buying? Say for example in a suburban area of Budapest or perhaps a smaller city like Szombathely?

Also, I have read some stories that people who try to speak Hungarian as non-Hungarians  have mixed responses from Hungarians. I have to say in contrast that when I speak Hungarian it is clear that it not my native language but that Hungarians respond really positively. I can converse pretty well but am out of practice to a degree but I always find people suddenly treat you much better when you do speak Hungarian with them.

Everyone does appreciate someone who puts in some effort.
I know my MIL was upset that I didn't know how to speak Hungarian back in 1978 when we visited for only 6 weeks.
Like I had any plans to ever move to communist Hungary from S. Ca. back then! She even went as far as to ask my husband, father of our child why he didn't marry a HU girl, yes, like they are a dime a dozen to find in S.Ca.

It all depends on who you mix with I suppose.

If you do not plan on being in Hungary full time, I would say to buy a apt. instead of a house.

Less worry when your gone.

No apps were used when we moved here, we just packed up and went.

What did you wish you had known before making the move to Hungary?
You can't prepare for every eventuality but hirering a large removal van was a bit of a waste of money. I could have just bought Ikea furniture and put the rest in storage for a while.
However,  I have brought more things over by car and van and also when friends were traveling and brought a box or two. So having my familiar items from my original larger removal and later bits and pieces really helped me feel home from home.

What do you think is the most important thing expats should know about Hungary that they don't already?

People have got lots of different ideas and perspectives.

I was too trusting of people who were working for me at the beginning but that has helped me be more clear to people about what I want. As a consequence I have gone from employing a gardener who spent a lot of time staring into space  to having more sociable visitors who help me with the garden.

I am also more aware that friends in the expat community can move on quite quickly. However,  when I meet real friends we stay friends through all the moves and this gives me opportunities to visit people in other countries.  I made friends with some really shallow people at the beginning but soon realised they were dragging me down because they were boring and didn't want to do anything other than moan  so I   moved on  fast.
Some really generous people have helped me a lot such as one of the people on here who is bringing my shopping over from the UK next time he visits.

My own employment and interests can be fairly solitary and I didn't really intend to work in Budapest but I found the long cold winter a bit of a drag and for social reasons I helped out in a language school. This led me to making more Hungarian  and expat friends. 

What ways were most efficient in helping you get organised in preparation for your move?

I took my time and it was a good five years between buying my holiday home in the countryside and stopping full time work in the uk. I am now semi retired but I like to keep busy and explore new things. As I was getting nearer to stopping full time work I realised that there were some things that I needed to base myself in Budapest for. I had also visited the city more and really enjoyed the vibrancy of the place.

I  got proper advice on purchasing my holiday homes and organising a residency card.  Some  other things I have had to learn via trial and error and this had sometimes been to my cost.
I would advise anybody to buy their own place because rents in Budapest for newcomers has really increased. It might be a bit of a stretch buying now but it's nice to be able to do your own thing in your own property. If you can't afford to buy in Budapest it is worth looking on the outskirts because property is still affordable and there are often good public transport systems to help you get into town. I am glad now that my tanya in the countryside is only just over an hour away from Budapest and the airport.   

Social media is very useful if you want to find out more about courses and different interest groups.

The most difficult move I've ever made due to the problems incurred getting legalized with resident status!

Do Hungarian citizens have better options even if they are from abroad? Do ALL foreigners get cheated? Is this true for renting as well as buying a home?
Thanks!

Chikagoan :

Do Hungarian citizens have better options even if they are from abroad? Do ALL foreigners get cheated? Is this true for renting as well as buying a home?
Thanks!

Basically if you open your mouth, the price goes up.  As soon as they knew you are a foreigner, then you are considered rich pickings.   If at all possible, get a native speaker to take care of initial contact. Mrs Fluffy always does first contact to determine the prices (of everything).  If I tried, it'd be 2-3 x more.

fluffy2560 :

Basically if you open your mouth, the price goes up.  As soon as they knew you are a foreigner, then you are considered rich pickings.   If at all possible, get a native speaker to take care of initial contact. Mrs Fluffy always does first contact to determine the prices (of everything).  If I tried, it'd be 2-3 x more.

Yes, that is particularly true at the car boot type markets, where nothing has the price marked. These days I don't even bother going to such markets unless I have a Hungarian who is available to come with me. With regard to buying a house, I would advise people to initially offer about 20% below the asking price, unless it is in a very sought-after area. For most of Hungary it is a buyers market and the house you like might have been on the market for years already.

Thanks! What about renting? I will likely be a Hungarian citizen when I rent. Have many Hungarians moved to the west and left apartments and houses abandoned in small towns, cities?

Chikagoan :

Thanks! What about renting? I will likely be a Hungarian citizen when I rent. Have many Hungarians moved to the west and left apartments and houses abandoned in small towns, cities?

Prices are rising fast.  Plenty of cheap stuff out in the sticks but it's out in the sticks so less desirable.  There's nothing to invest in within Hungary but property. People are using their disposable income on house building/improvements.  Lots of building projects going on.

Doesn't matter if you are citizen. If you open your mouth and have an accent of any kind, you'll be considered fair game.

We learned the hard way, my husband is Hungarian and speaks without a accent, has a "Budapest accent" but the way he speaks is old style from over 40 years ago. He doesn't use the loose slang and more forward way of speaking that is the fashion right now.
People look at him and often ask if he is Hungarian or not.
I am not allowed into small shops if he has any business going on in there. I wait outside or down the st.
I am a dead give away and prices go up as soon as I am around.
I wouldn't buy in Hungary if you do not plan on being here at least half the year or more.
With flats all the utility companies want to enter at least once a year to double check the meter readings, if you have meters in your flat.The chimney man comes once a year and if he is not allowed inside he will report you to the fire dept. All sorts of visits from meters having to be changed out every few years to readings, you will need a trusted person to allow these workers inside if you are out of the country.
Have to arrange mail pick up etc.
We were often gone for over 18 months to 2 years in the past.
Had the keys left with a old friend, learned he was not exactly who he used to be, gave the keys to our nephew once, worked out but a few small items were missing.
Just not a good situation to put yourself in.
We do have a sweet neighbor who picks up our mail for us and even pays a few bills, we trust her enough to leave a large amount of cash with her in case anything should come up while we're gone.
Long story but we do not want to leave our keys with her because of pressure on her from other people, every neighborhood has it's "watchers" and people who run things from the side.
Most foreigners wouldn't be aware of that but it is a reality, they at first tried hard to get my husband into it through his old friends, even here in Budapest.
One reason we no longer left the keys with people.
They gave up on us not sure why but glad of it, guess they figured as he was also a US citizen things could get complicated if he didn't do as they wished.
Same thing happened in the US, we took ourselves out of the loop for over 30 years. We worked hard and honestly for every little thing we have and this group as it's schemes and back stabbings.
that's what happens when you used to know half the people in the city like my husband did back in the 60's.
Many of these players have since passed on but there are always those ready to step into their old shoes.
That being said, it isn't so bad paying a bit more here and there because you are foreign, the locals have their own issues to deal with.
That's about all I can say about this subject, do not want another knock at my door, people asking questions for police reports etc...
I would rent first for at least a year and see how things unfold before jumping into buying anything if I were you. We bought fast but only because of some family things that were going on at the time.
Sort of pressured to buy fast.
You should try out the city, the smaller towns , the mountains and the lakes before jumping into buying anything. You may be stuck with a property that you find isn't what you really wanted or expected.
Honestly, I do not see why actually "owning" anything is better then renting. I almost would rather rent because if there are any issues you just need to make a phone call to get them sorted out, owning things sometimes becomes the situation where things own you.

Not sure but have heard that in the S. parts of Hungary many people are moving in from Romania.
Many Hungarians have gone to the west for work in those areas and left homes, not sure people are moving in for free, doubt that but prices are pretty low in some areas. Some very nice homes too.
I know in 1956 and after the war, people just moved into empty flats and took over from there, that situation is not happening here as of yet from anything I know.
In any case why would anyone move into a place where they know no one and take over, the locals would not allow that to happen, they would move in themselves first.
I heard in 1956 it was a bit wild , people just moving into flats on hearing someone left the country or was arrested. Not like that now.
Makes me wonder how tough some people actually were and how heavy handed they were to move into a huge flat that was empty, guess the more ruthless people moved quickly.
I know many people suffered for those big apts. in nice areas as well as some people just being put in flats because of who they knew or what they did.
Our old friend who we no longer seek out ( he is a alcoholic now and other issues) has a very, very nice flat in the 5th district, his father moved them in in 56 when it was left empty.
Many others wanted that flat for themselves. One man went so far as to try and black mail our friend's father to get the flat for himself.
His dad told the guy to get lost. He made up some tales on our friend's dad about activities he may or may not of been involved with when he was a young soldier in the HU Army in WW11.
In 56 they seemed ready to arrest just about anyone on rumors.
He got arrested and hung, left our friend and his twin bro alone with their mom , they kept that flat but wow, there must be ghosts in the place! Horrible really.

Priscilla :

were there any particularly useful websites or apps?

I moved to Hungary before the iPhone, so no apps. And before this web site existed (which I think is very helpful).

The one web site that I did find very informative was by an American-Hungarian who consulted American businesses wanting to do business in Hungary. He had a lot of information about the differences of the two cultures, for example, and how to bridge them. Very useful. Unfortunately, the web site, and his business, no longer exists.

One thing i would tell someone is that Hungary embraces Americanism much more so than i would of ever thought. Hearing USA music on the radio, USA tv shows and seeing NFL and NHL is very odd to me. Also Hungary does not have much of other European overlaps culture wise. It is easier to find tacos or sushi  than it is Zupa grzybowa or Grybukai or Kibinai! he hee. So i think i will suggest to invest in some cookbooks! he hee

FeliciaOni :

One thing i would tell someone is that Hungary embraces Americanism much more so than i would of ever thought. Hearing USA music on the radio, USA tv shows and seeing NFL and NHL is very odd to me. Also Hungary does not have much of other European overlaps culture wise. It is easier to find tacos or sushi  than it is Zupa grzybowa or Grybukai or Kibinai! he hee. So i think i will suggest to invest in some cookbooks! he hee

I've got deja-vu.

Not to rain on your parade and definitely not trolling but we Europeans are not "embracing" American culture. It could be that you are hanging around with the wrong people, in the wrong places and watching the wrong TV shows.   Europe is of course, not one country just like the USA is not one giant blob of a single state.  Things are different to California to say, New York.

Sure, we look at US produced TV programmes, hear US music but very few people have any interest in American "sport".  America would love us to watch NFL but we've got games like Rugby which are more entertaining and the game doesn't stop for advertising breaks.  The dominant sport everywhere in Europe is proper football (USA: soccer).   

There are some fantastically good European TV  shows worth watching which are richer culturally than the stuff pumped out by Hollywood. Some examples: Gomorrah, Wallander, Fortitude etc.   

If you go to any European city (or most other places), you'll see more or less the same things going on there as here.   For marketing purposes (and that includes marketing TV shows and movies), it's all very flat Euro-normal. Everyone the world over eats pizza and frites and everyone knows what Goulash and Borscht is but they don't necessarily want it. 

So dig a bit deeper then you'll find it's very different from the USA.   We're enjoying some US things but I cannot say we're embracing it, admiring it or endorsing it.

Good morning,

I just read your article and it's brilliant and very well constructed! I am a new-bee to Budapest, along with my Hungarian wife, and making every attempt to BLEND in and be a small part of this beautiful country.
We arrived back from the USA this past March 2017 and I've already gotten my Resident & Address ID cards and actively looking for employment in the tourist business.

I respect the PEOPLE, their way of LIFE and CULTURE and I know that I am privileged to be a GUEST in this HOST country!

If you're looking for American things in Hungary then you can find them if you try.
In the US they have Hungarian restaurants so why not have American foods in Hungary.
In NYC they have or had when I lived there a few blocks near 82 or 83rd st. that are more HUngarian then here in Hungary. Loved eating there, people speak Hungarian and the delis are just wonderful. This was in the 1970's not sure it is the same now or not.
It does come down to where you hang and with who. In the US as .a child we went to the Russian Club.
They had weddings, parties and even semi- American style BBQ's in the summertime, this was in the 1950's. My US cousins still go to huge events in Conn that serve Polish, Hungarian , Russian foods and have polkas and folk dancing, lots of fun really.
I personally have always enjoyed eastern European style foods more then a hamburger and fries.
My family growing up always served what my school friends would call, strange foods" stuffed cabbages, pickled pigs feet, homemade cinnamon pastries like HU style ( My mom cooked allot of HU foods because her SIL was from HU and taught her things)
My friends would ask what my mom was cooking before they said they would come and eat over...Not everyone likes a nice liver and onions with rice pudding for desert.
In grade school in Ca. kids used to trade school lunches that their mom's packed. No one wanted to trade with me... Those head cheese sandwiches and homemade cookies could not compete  with a normal style lunch meat and a bag of chips and a Ding-dong. ( sounds rude but it is a sweet treat a bakery good)
Music wise, well the largest music co. are artists either from the UK or the USA, starting I suppose with Elvis and the Beatles, Little Richard etc. HU rock music is good but not really known world wide.
Only a few HU artists made it to the US to tour, Loco Motive GT from the 70's for one, You probably have never heard of them.Of course there are groups from other countries that are well known but in general the more well known are from the US or UK. That's why you hear more from them on the radio.
Smaller countries do take on things from larger countries.
I for one have never sat through a Rugby game or God forbid a NFL or baseball game on the tv.
Now figure skating will have me hooked in a second. No question a Sumo match will have me in front of the set all day long.
Different tastes is all.
Believe me, my first few times visiting in HU I was hard pressed to even hear one word in English,times are changing due to the internet and HU joining the EU.
You should get out of the city more and see the real Hungary.

I think they have so many bars that play NFL games to lure in some tourists on a rainy or cold day or students who miss home. They can charge higher prices in these bars then just a normal Locals "kocsma".
People will keep buying overpriced drinks until the game is over with.
I doubt many Hungarians really are "enjoying" the game but one never knows.
Made me think again, it is all about the people you hang with.
I am not Mexican and can't speak more the 2nd grade Spanish but we lived in New Mexico. All my co workers at a job at Intel I had were Mexican/Americans. We worked in a crew of about 6 people in a team.
All worked 10 hours a day 3 days a week and then 4 days the following week. Got double time pay on Sundays and after 8 hours other days.
On Sundays the Intel plant was very quiet the clean tech's like us had hardly anything to do all day long but be there 2 times a day to suit up in contamination suits and just empty a small waste basket.
Weird I know but it was good paying and a off beat job, the sort I like to have.
We had to stick together all day long with our crew however, just in case we got a call for a job on Sunday in a hurry, had to be able for us all to get back to Intel all at one time.
Basically we were paid to empty one or two trash cans 2 times on sunday for 10 hours of pay.
Boring as heck really so we all went Mexican.
I swear I hung at every Mexican real Mexican restaurant in Albq.
places off the beaten track.
We hung in Malls together and rented DVD's all day long while being on the clock at work.
Could say i was almost in Mexico every Sunday while being in the US.
It was interesting for sure.
It's all about where and who you know.

Hungarian (and any local culture really) went into sharp decline with the emergence of multiculturalism.

Also, the emergence of english as the global language accelerated the process. Until latin was the dominant, roman culture was the norm. Later, it was french. Now, it is english, but soon chineese will take over.

So when anybody moves here, they can help slow down this process by integrating and assimilating into the host culture.

Fluffy2560

I agree with " we Europeans " yes everything you said is correct. I was speaking of what is said Hungary. That is the point of what i saying other places in Europe embrace Americanism much less than Hungary does. I am not speaking of Europe if so i will speak of the things in the other countries i have lived or been too, this is about Hungary.

I watched Wallander both the Swedish one and the UK one on tv back in Florida and both the other shows you mentioned and many more. What i am saying is i DO NOT like the USA shows or NFL or NHL i did not in USA so that is why i find it annoying it is on at all here.

Mailman1942

"I respect the PEOPLE, their way of LIFE and CULTURE and I know that I am privileged to be a GUEST in this HOST country!" I totally agree with this! I truly dislike it when at least usa expats disrespect people here. I had some UK one do that but i am a usa person so when my own people do it i feel just horrible. That is a post i will start on that in a min.

Marilyn

I am just speaking of observations i had not JUST Budapest but a few other cities i have been too. But i think you do understand what i mean. Yes in USA we did not have to dig or look so hard for other types of European things. I understand USA and the places i lived, FL, CA, CO, well not Montana but yes there are places where people live totally their own culture. I just thought there would be even more easy here in Hungary.

I did not intend for this or any post i have as a beat up on Hungary as i have always said i am happy to be here and like i said i do not respect expats that claim it is hell on earth cause as i said if it truly horrible then you should move. Just like if you are married and you are going totally batty then get a divorcee rather than suffer! he hee

I was just expressing my observations of being in Hungary both in Budapest and the few other cities i have been too, Dombóvár , Bekescsaba, Kazincbarcika. And i enjoy and respect everyone's views and it is good to hear different things. I do not expect others to agree with me and i do not agree with others many times. Difference is a good thing i feel.

FeliciaOni :

.....other places in Europe embrace Americanism much less than Hungary does. I am not speaking of Europe if so i will speak of the things in the other countries i have lived or been too, this is about Hungary.

I would have said the opposite. I regard Hungary as one of the most insular countries in Europe and I think that is one of the reasons salaries are so low. I spend about half my time in Croatia, where I see evidence of depopulation everywhere I go. People learn extra languages and go to other countries to get well paid jobs. The same happens in Hungary but to a much smaller extent, mainly due to Hungarians being less willing to learn extra languages.  There are 2 TV channels in Croatia devoted to English language content, RTL2 and Doma. Most of this comes from USA and several Croatians have told me it is how they learned English. Unlike in Hungary the English language soundtrack is broadcast with subtitles in Croatian.  In my village in Hungary I don't know anyone who speaks English but in Croatia even the staff in tiny remote village often can speak English.

Rawlee :

Hungarian (and any local culture really) went into sharp decline with the emergence of multiculturalism.

I would counter that Hungarian rather went into sharp decline because Hungarian diaspora in places like Romania in Transylvania were prevented from existing in a multicultural environment. Suppression of the Hungarian language and culture occurred there for decades. And some say continues today, despite both countries being "EU" members where such things are not suppose to happen. Meanwhile, the Hungarian governments decries multiculturalism in Hungary, but today promotes it in another (EU) country. Hypocritical? Well, governments are never rational or consistent. They just want to gain votes and stay in power, so play a different song to a different audience depending on where they are. And hope each group drinks the local Kool-Aid.

Also, do note, that in Switzerland, where my wife and parents became refugees, and in the USA, where her grandfather was a refugee do allow multiculturalism (but I admit, less so today -- we are in changing times). Yet Hungarians there still talk Hungarian and express their culture.

Where were local languages and cultures historically suppressed in mass, sometimes to the point of extinction? In European colonies. Where European ways, languages and culture were pressed upon the local populations by Europeans. Multiculturalism (i.e. the local culture) was suppressed in such colonies.

I do wonder, if one believes in Karma where payback in kind comes eventually, if the current rhetorical in so many places today is just sour grapes from experiencing said Karma. Something to think about.

fidobsa :
FeliciaOni :

.....other places in Europe embrace Americanism much less than Hungary does. I am not speaking of Europe if so i will speak of the things in the other countries i have lived or been too, this is about Hungary.

I would have said the opposite. I regard Hungary as one of the most insular countries in Europe and I think that is one of the reasons salaries are so low. I spend about half my time in Croatia, where I see evidence of depopulation everywhere I go. People learn extra languages and go to other countries to get well paid jobs. The same happens in Hungary but to a much smaller extent, mainly due to Hungarians being less willing to learn extra languages..... Most of this comes from USA and several Croatians have told me it is how they learned English. Unlike in Hungary the English language soundtrack is broadcast with subtitles in Croatian.  In my village in Hungary I don't know anyone who speaks English but in Croatia even the staff in tiny remote village often can speak English.

I'd second all that is said. 

I've worked in Croatia a couple of times and everyone I've met there, even the lowest level shop assistants are able to speak at least some English or German.  I've found the same everywhere in the former Yugoslavia.  Some of them can speak and write absolutely fantastically good English.   

But things are changing in Hungary.  When I first came no-one spoke English to any  extent - it was German (and not even Russian) but that was ~23 years ago and there's a new generation.   I was in Bauhaus and the guy putting out the light bulbs helped me in English. And a guy who came to finish the programming of my burglar alarm installation also spoke sufficient English for us to work on it together. 

They should stop dubbing the TV here and use the original language soundtrack.  In other countries, I used subtitles to help me learn the local language and it's really very helpful indeed.

I seem to be learning enough Hungarian to get by and that is sufficient for me because all the work I can potentially do requires the English language. And I am not a quick learner of languages and have struggled for years with French.
It suits me a lot not understanding Hungarian when I am on public transport because I can just chill and enjoy the ambiance. I don't think I am being slagged off for being an incomer but that wouldn't bother me in any case.
In the uk when I visit I can't help but listen to the most banal or the most interesting conversations. This can be very distracting.

I have been helping out at a small language school in Budapest and I really enjoy working with the learners who are all desperate to improve there English fluency, often for work purposes.  However even in the countryside recently more people approach me for English conversation. Hungarian people seem much more keen on learning English than even five years ago.

Hello everyone,

Please note that some posts have been put aside from this topic which was drifting from the initial topic.

Let us please share our views on post #1.

Thanks in advance,
Bhavna

Bhavna :

Hello everyone,

Please note that some posts have been put aside from this topic which was drifting from the initial topic.

Let us please share our views on post #1.

Thanks in advance,
Bhavna

Thanks for putting us out of our misery!

I am just starting the process of getting my Hungarian citizenship "reinstated"....  Was born there and immigrated to the U.S. when I was 18.  Now retired, I decided to move back.  My U.S. monthly government pension (Social Security income) is about Ft 400,000.
Is that enough to live a simple life in a good area of Budapes (I favor Terezvaros - the area around Andrassi Ut and Lenin Korut)?  If not, how much extra would I need, and is it easy to attain a part-time job.  I speak fluent English (I used to write professionally about politics and the economy) and also fluent in Hungarian, albeit now with an American accent (I know; that's hilarious...)  I also speak fairly well in Italian and a little French.  My background is in commercial real estate investment, and also worked as a stock broker with a major investment firm (Morgan Stanley).  I was also in commercial real estate sales for years and managed art galleries in New York and in California.  Not an attorney, but have a lot of business/legal expertise.  I am also an exhibiting artist and paint very large canvases with acrylic.  I only started painting in the past year, but have been selling my works for $1,500 a piece...  Am I going to be able to make a life in Hungary with abut $50,000 U.S. to invest in my retirement life-style?  I would appreciate any feedback!  Thank you!

Hi
With all your skills and experience I don't think you will have any problems at all.  Apartment rentals and the cost of purchasing an apartment slap bang center has really risen in the past  two or three years but accommodation in the suburbs and the countryside is still very affordable.

Panni36 :

I only started painting in the past year, but have been selling my works for $1,500 a piece.

If you have an international clientele, keep it up. I know many excellent, wonderful painters in Hungary unable to sell their work for even a fraction of that price.

klsallee :
Panni36 :

I only started painting in the past year, but have been selling my works for $1,500 a piece.

If you have an international clientele, keep it up. I know many excellent, wonderful painters in Hungary unable to sell their work for even a fraction of that price.

I second that.

I was at a  social function recently at the Hotel Flamenco (Tas vezér Street).  I buy art myself and I've got quite a lot of paintings and art work (too many according to Mrs Fluffy). I bought about 5 abstract works myself in the past 12 months.

Anyway, at the Hotel Flamenco, there were smallish paintings for sale there and all I can say is that they were absolutely terrible. And expensive. And amateurish.  About 25K HUF each.

So at USD 1500 a piece you are doing well.

Dang. I have 2 paintings by a Hungarian, gay, dead artist who was one of our buddies Both in storage in the US.
Had several others he gave us but we gave them back when he had a art show in Budapest a few years back and wanted to show some of his older work.
I may be sitting on a gold mine.
One painting I know my husband will never part with but the other , titled," Angel of Harlem" might be worth a few bucks...
Most of his work was abstract with male "gay" undertones... The one we are keeping is more of a spiritual painting.
There are so many very talented people in Hungary, no one could really say what your work is worth without seeing it first.
We have known a couple of Hungarians who lived in the US and had personal art shows in Budapest.
Not sure but some made more money scamming the airlines with their so called lost art work then in actual sales of their work...
On another note, I think you will be fine in HU with your SS income.

Thank you for the information!  I paint very large canvases, so everything I do makes quite a statement.  There does not seem to be a way to attach any photos here, but if you are on Facebook, you can find me there under Livia Balogh and look at my work there - I just set-up this non-personal page just to promote my paintings.    Since I just started painting a few months ago with no prior experience, I am still finding my way, and getting better all the time : )

Panni36 :

Thank you for the information!  I paint very large canvases, so everything I do makes quite a statement.  There does not seem to be a way to attach any photos here, but if you are on Facebook, you can find me there under Livia Balogh and look at my work there - I just set-up this non-personal page just to promote my paintings.    Since I just started painting a few months ago with no prior experience, I am still finding my way, and getting better all the time : )

You can attach links to photos by pressing Reply and using the link or picture icon.

You need to store the photos somewhere else like say, Photobucket or Dropbox (Google for them).

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