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Inquiry on Canje Process

Hello,
I am exploring permanent residency and interested to learn more about the canje process. What are others' experiences in this matter regarding the average days/weeks required for this part of the process? Getting the visa would not be that much of a problem as I meet the economic solvency, but don't believe I can wait for up to ~3 -4 weeks for approval letter, CURP process due to professional obligations back in US.

Many thanks -

Everyone says 3 to 4 weeks to complete the process here in Mexico, but that has not been my experience. I applied in the states and received my permenant resident stamp in my passports in a few hours. I applied here in Mexico to complete the process and that was may 2nd. A friend had her card in 4 weeks but knows a couple, like myself, still waiting after a couple of months. I would give it 6 months to be safe, because you can't leave the country with out a letter of permission .

Hello Mel01,
Thanks for sharing.  Any idea on the especially long wait time in your instance?
Anything in your background or situation would warrant it?

Or maybe the time of year has something to do with it?

Thanks -

Nope , worked for state governments in USA my whole life , no arrests nothing. Approved at Mexican consulate in states no problem. I have a attorney that did it for me here thank goodness. Just fell thru the cracks ? And it has happened to other people to. So adjust your time estimates to include any unforeseen circumstances.

Many thanks -
Is there a way to expedite the process...?  Perhaps consultants who does this for a living are aware of...not short cuts, but just faster ways to navigate the system.  Depending on departmental bureaucrats to process paperwork can be a bit frustrating, if you know what I mean.

I don't know honestly, I have a attorney that does this. I don't know what I would have done if I hadn't have used him .  I know what you mean lol I worked for them . Good luck maybe other posters will have suggestions.

Mel01,
To leave the country, I would need a letter of permission.
Because the notification is by email, right?  I can leave, and as soon as I get notification I can return.  I might have to look more into that approach.  I'm not yet retired and still have working obligations back in US.

Mel01 :

Everyone says 3 to 4 weeks to complete the process here in Mexico, but that has not been my experience. I applied in the states and received my permenant resident stamp in my passports in a few hours. I applied here in Mexico to complete the process and that was may 2nd. A friend had her card in 4 weeks but knows a couple, like myself, still waiting after a couple of months. I would give it 6 months to be safe, because you can't leave the country with out a letter of permission .

If it has been months Melo1,

I would recommend you go to their office before the holidays start. you really do have to check often and then go to the office.

The holidays which are very soon really jam things up. You do not want to wait for October. Every holiday slows you down, people go on vacation, you just had Independence day which is more important than Cinco de Mayo. Dia de los Muertos isn't exactly your standard holiday but it is a big deal. There was the lady of Guadalupe event which tied up about a week. I think you get the point.
Act now.

Thanks travellite! I ( or )  my attorney and his representative have been there over and over . Heard  Same answer next week, and next week over again. Attorney now filing papers on my behalf to require explanation for delay . I'm just glad I got a attorney because I would not have known what to do, except go back and hear next week over and over again . Just wanted to let people know things happen and you can'talways  count on a few weeks .

Mel01 :

Thanks travellite! I ( or )  my attorney and his representative have been there over and over . Heard  Same answer next week, and next week over again. Attorney now filing papers on my behalf to require explanation for delay . I'm just glad I got a attorney because I would not have known what to do, except go back and hear next week over and over again . Just wanted to let people know things happen and you can'talways  count on a few weeks .

I didn't use an attorney, but I do have a good friend who has family in government, which might be better. For me it took two weeks longer than it should have or a total of about a month of waiting and staying on their case.  You really must be on their case.
I ran into some holiday issues, but not the big ones you are facing. The agent dealing with the final paper work went on her vacation, her replacement was not familiar with how that office worked, and charged me a fee I had already paid.  she absolutely refused to believe I had already paid, so to move things forward again I paid again. then it took 2 months to get that money back, but at least I had the paper work completed and my ID card in hand.

I may be wrong, but from what I have seen with one other person the attorney doesn't actually seem to speed things up. They really are a  face to face people. When you are not there things get set a side including paperwork. Especially if that paperwork has to go to Mexico (city). Going through there is why it took 2 months to get my money back. First the paperwork needed to be changed, then they were using a new computer program sent by Mexico which no one could get the hang of. Then I needed paperwork from my bank, (a Mexican Bank) to send the money directly to them. When computers and paperwork is involved things really slow down.

Buena suerte

Thanks travellight,
To leave the country, I read that I would need a letter of permission.
Assuming I can get that document, because the notification is by email, I can leave, and as soon as I get notification I can return. Is that correct, or am I putting too much faith in their notification/communication system?  I might have to look more into that approach. 

I'm not yet retired and still have working obligations back in US.  Henceforth, I am not in a position to just stay and wait in Mexico ~3-6 weeks if not longer.

cc532 :

Thanks travellight,
To leave the country, I read that I would need a letter of permission.
Assuming I can get that document, because the notification is by email, I can leave, and as soon as I get notification I can return. Is that correct, or am I putting too much faith in their notification/communication system?  I might have to look more into that approach. 

I'm not yet retired and still have working obligations back in US.  Henceforth, I am not in a position to just stay and wait in Mexico ~3-6 weeks if not longer.

Previously you required a letter of permission if everything was not finalized. I would think that is still true, but things change. That letter would have to be obtained directly from them . I had to obtain a similar letter to get my car a permit to take it out of the country because I was out of time on my temporary visa, and I could not have a U.S. car. I had to go to La hacienda for that.. They are very formal when it comes to things like that, and not flexible with dates, so keep that in mind

So best plan is to see what they are doing at the time you need the information. I will keep my eye out for newer information.

This is what I have seen : "Note that when you get a Letter from INM permitting you to leave Mexico, it is  for up to 180 days of travel, that letter expires in 60 days, so you must officially leave Mexico within 60 days of the letter’s issuance date.

If you drive out of Mexico without registering your exit with INM, then the 60 day clock is still ticking – and you must then return to your INM office within 60 days – and you effectively lose the 180 day grace period. This means you should make the effort to find an open INM office when you drive out, and have them record your exit from Mexico, to qualify for the 180 day permission.

It is important to do these things properly, otherwise, you may have to start the whole Residente Permanente or Residente Temporal process all-over-again – re-paying full fees (no credits).

Also note that : If you have already successfully turning in your ID fotos, been fingerprinted, and paid for your Residente Permanente or Residente Temporal, you can give a Carta de Poder letter to a trusted friend or family member, granting them permission to pick up your new Tarjeta de Residencia when it is ready. They then send you your new Residency by DHL or UPS, while you are still in Canada or the USA – and you then turn in your INM letter when you renter Mexico using your new Residency Card."

So basically be sure you check with them when you leave, and register that you are leaving. You can get a second permission for a friend to pick up your card it seems. You have 60 days to leave and 180 to be gone and you must check in coming in and going out Sounds like fun doesn't it  :/

http://www.inm.gob.mx/index.php/page/So … e_Estancia

I have recently inquired with attorney because it is taking so long, travellight is correct about the requirements for letter. I don't believe anything has changed.

Yes, I believed that to leave the country temporarily, I would need a letter of permission for exception from the authorities. 

As I'm not yet retired and still have working obligations back in US, I was thinking about another person with assigned Power of Attorney privileges (or attorney) picking up the ID card for me.  You seem to confirmed that it is at least possible, if tricky.

The key issue for one in my situation is the waiting up to ~3 - 4 weeks (or longer) for approval letter (or oficio) that application is approved, and receipt of temporary ID card (CURP).  I am only interested in the Permanent Residency Card. 

Do you have any towns, INM offices you can recommend to play this out?  I would be flexible.

Haven't been to Mexico since I lived in San Diego several years ago. While there, I would visit Tijuana on occasion, and sometimes a town ~1.5 to 2 hours south (don't recall the name), and to Ensenada once or twice.  Always liked the country and the people, the language - it's just that I'm now on the East coast.

Only outstanding sticky point might be the bank, as I understand that one has to be at least a temporary resident to open an account, and unless fees are accepted at INM offices, that matter would need to be addressed as well.

cc532 :

Yes, I believed that to leave the country temporarily, I would need a letter of permission for exception from the authorities. 

As I'm not yet retired and still have working obligations back in US, I was thinking about another person with assigned Power of Attorney privileges (or attorney) picking up the ID card for me.  You seem to confirmed that it is at least possible, if tricky.

The key issue for one in my situation is the waiting up to ~3 - 4 weeks (or longer) for approval letter (or oficio) that application is approved, and receipt of temporary ID card (CURP).  I am only interested in the Permanent Residency Card. 

Do you have any towns, INM offices you can recommend to play this out?  I would be flexible.

Haven't been to Mexico since I lived in San Diego several years ago. While there, I would visit Tijuana on occasion, and sometimes a town ~1.5 to 2 hours south (don't recall the name), and to Ensenada once or twice.  Always liked the country and the people, the language - it's just that I'm now on the East coast.

Only outstanding sticky point might be the bank, as I understand that one has to be at least a temporary resident to open an account, and unless fees are accepted at INM offices, that matter would need to be addressed as well.

As far as fees go , I used a ATM. Find out what the fees are Your paper work should tell you that , but INM provides you with a paper, you take that paper and your pesos to almost any bank and pay those fees there. they give you a receipt to take back to the INM office. Be sure all of your information is spelled correctly, I went around and around with bancomer  because the clerk got it in her head that my name was spelled differently than it is . So be careful about that. before you leave the bank make sure the paperwork is correct. When you need a Mexican bank is later if they make a mistake and they owe you money like they did me. But I don't think that is common.

What INM office you use depends on where you plan to be.

A letter to exit and return from the INM [Mexican Immigration] is only for 60 days, not 180 days. You have to return within the 60 days having the letter stamped when you leave and stamped when you re-enter and go directly to your local INM office that issued the letter with the stamped letter. They give you the letter only a few days before you are planning to exit Mexico when you are in "tramite" [processing] your immigration "stay" or status. My friend got one last month when he was renewing his Residente Temporal visa/card. It has been that way since Nov. 9th. 2012.

As I have pointed out previously, your really do need to see what the current rules are when seeking your permiso de salida y regreso. To date the most recent changes were posted by the
Secretary of Foreign Relations
Publication date
July 23, 2015

Yucatan living and Yucatan news might also be interesting reading regarding the dos and don'ts http://www.theyucatantimes.com/2014/04/ … a-tourist/

Do appreciate the insights, viewpoints, suggestions from all of you.
Sharpened my understanding of the possibilities and requirements.

Feel free to submit any additional and important information that would be helpful.

As I am not a complete novice in obtainment of Permanent Residency (am a PR in Panama), all countries have their own rules and laws regarding visas and residency matters.

INM offices vary in how long to process. Once approved, typically in many offices after ~3 weeks, you request and pay for a travel letter. In San Miguel the letter takes 2 business days. Once issued you may be gone for up to 60 days. Before requesting travel letter in your case be sure to also complete finger prints.
The idea for a TR visa is for one to live in Mexico more than 180 days and up to 4 years. In the US a Mexican applying for a visa may not leave for up to a year.

cc532 :

Do appreciate the insights, viewpoints, suggestions from all of you.
Sharpened my understanding of the possibilities and requirements.

Feel free to submit any additional and important information that would be helpful.

As I am not a complete novice in obtainment of Permanent Residency (am a PR in Panama), all countries have their own rules and laws regarding visas and residency matters.

Hi cc532 and all others, this is my wife and I personal experience which took place from August 26th till September 12th 2017.
First, got all our paperwork done at the Mexican Consulate in Montreal so we had the Visa for Permanent residency cards  (CANJE). At the consulate, they told us how to fill the FMM so to make sure we checked the CANJE box and but as residency Nayarit, Mexico .
Second, when we arrived at Mexico international airport (August 26th), the INM officer explained to us we had 30 days to go at the INM office in Nayarit  (Nuevo Vallarta in our case), you must go to the INM office located in the state where you will live. If you move, you have to advise INM within 90 days of your new address.
Third, I called the INM office in Nuevo Vallarta on the 28th, they told me to come in early to avoid waiting time  (hours are normally for all offices 9Am to 1PM).
Fourth, on the 29th, left early from La Peñita de Jaltemba by bus Primera plus arrived at the INM office at 9:03 and we were the first customers, they had 2 attendants fast and courteous, started documentation told us the next steps (need to pay the fees at the bank Banorte with ATM'S downstairs and have pictures taken and copies made within the complex. Went back to INM waited about 10 minutes before our attendant was available. Our attendant completed the documentation gave us our NUT number to follow the process online. She also ask us if we needed to leave Mexico before the next 4 weeks, if we had to she would of helped us in regards to the letter quoted by Sonia Diaz. She also advised us about the next 2 steps  (fingerprints and cards issued) and that we would receive an e-mail also in regards of the notice for fingerprints, she suggested we have the notice printed in case it would be another attendant the next time (total time about 90 minutes).
Fifth, on September 5th, looking at the process status via internet, we saw the notice "oficio", went to the internet café got it printed. The next day, left early again but the bus was late so arrived at 9:15 at INM now 3 attendants waited about 15 minutes and got the same attendant, a few documents, fingerprints that's it took less than 30 minutes.
Sixth, on the 11th, checked the internet site for following the status, the notice is there, our migration documents are ready please got to the INM office to pick them up. The next day 12th, bus earlier so we arrived before the office was open, lucky again got the same attendant "Señorita Dulce". Got our permanent residency cards within 15 minutes that included a little chat with Dulce.

Important note, I speak spanish but all the attendants speak good english and they are very helpfull in Nuevo Vallarta, Nayarit.

For us, the service was great and the maximum process time they say on the first visit is 3 to 4 weeks thus asking if you have to leave Mexico during that time.

Also, your address is also very important in regards to driver's licence, IMSS healthcare and other government tramites.

Buen dia a todos, GyC.

Also, a friend of mine got his residente temporal visa late last September within 4 days in Zihuatanejo.

So, I think the CANJE process is easy and fast but I wouldn't start the process via internet on my own, I suggest all to go directly at the INM office.

All should try to avoid high season like starting mid-october till mid-january when all NOTB are in Mexico.

Adios, GyC.

Hello Sonia Diaz Ortega,
I have a few questions.
Could I contact you? Thanks.

cc532 :

Hello Sonia Diaz Ortega,
I have a few questions.
Could I contact you? Thanks.

Hi again,  for your information her website is  http://www.soniadiaz.mx and from there you can write or call.

Hope this helps.

Adios y buen dia a todos, GyC.

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