Retiring in Turkey

Hello everyone,

Why did you choose to retire in Turkey? What are the advantages compared with your home country?

What were your main considerations when deciding to move? For example, taxes, ease of transferring your pension, etc..

Are there any specific formalities you had to go through as a retiree moving to Turkey (for example, is there a particular retirement visa)?

What is Turkey's healthcare like? Have you had any good or bad experiences dealing with healthcare professionals?

Do you have any tips for other retirees in Turkey?

Thank you for sharing your experience.

Priscilla

Health care doesn't cover everything. and I was speaking to one friend today she said dental care is very up high in the sky and they charge with euro.life is clean and disciplined.Health care plans for those retiring here on tourist visa must be improved and cover all conditions even dental.
Also one of my daughters friends her father fell on his head and went to hospital they told him come tomorrow and didnt even do x ray on the skull
yes there are many complains from health care
professional doctors from other countries must be allowed here. to disolve language barriers and this is needed by foreigners here.

For those who paid attention to the system-wide issues stated in Post #2, Turkey is a great 90-day, "Turkish people-to-Global Community people" location to visit.

Turkey is also an Archeological site(s) visitor's paradise. We recommend purchasing the ""All Turkey Museums, Two-Week Pass for 185TL @ any museum location. We recommend the City of Izmir, as a base-point for visiting various popular sites, due to Izmir's 1-2 hour traveling-time proximity to most south-western sites.

The Basmane central train station is the usual, daily (07:15) launch-location to reach several popular sites, especially "Ephesus" ("Efes" in Turkish).

Sociologically, the Turkish people are (generally) the most pro-actively welcoming, and most genuinely friendly people in Asia. Turks will readily chat with you, give you helpful directions (even the police officers, on the street) in Turkish, despite their knowing that you do not understand a word they've said. Now that is pro-actively friendly behavior, indeed! :top:

However, regarding the long-term stay "Retirement in Turkey" topic is concerned ~ FYI - only if one is already married to a Turkish citizen (from back home), and/or has substantially deep retirement pockets, to support a European-side of Istanbul lifestyle :cool:

Hi
Actually I didn't retired in Turkey. We were living in Iran. and my husband retired there.
So i don't have any idea for this matter.

siwmman :

Health care plans for those retiring here on tourist visa must be improved and cover all conditions even dental.

Which country in the world offers visitors on tourist visas any free health care?

cancelled

Hi there

We plan to retire in Turkey after our son finishes his education in about a year and half. We have some good Turkish friends in Perth, and started to study about Turkey and its regions.

We like what we heard about Bursa but are concerned it might be too cold for us. Our Turkish friends have a property in Fethiye and told us a lot of good things about it but it seems that it is more for tourists. We are not really looking for a tourist town. I think maybe a nice village or a small town close to the Mediterranean's Turquoise Coast beaches would be a nice place for us.

We have been living on a small hobby farm in Australia for the past 13 years. Of course, as we progress to retirement, we will down size so that we will spend more time looking after ourselves than working on and maintaining the land. We think a house on a 2000-4000 m2 block would be ideal for us. We hope to be able to bring our dogs with us.

When we have a chance we will be visiting Turkey but we don't know when at this stage. We think the best course of action is to go to Turkey and live there for a few month, rent a car and explore ...

Meanwhile, we welcome any comments, feedback or ideas about places in Turkey that you may think to be suitable for us.

Well, last but not least, thank you for your time, and we look forward to hearing from you.

All the best and bye for now ...

Greetings, we've already been there, done that, and have the T-shirt collection.

Indeed, Turkey is a real "paradise", especially for expats coming from other Mediterranean regions, or the African continent locations.

FYI ~ do "yourselves" a huge favor. Enjoy a 30-day tourist excursion. Expect no Turk to speak English (with very few exceptions). Purchase the 185TL (two-week pass) to the museum and archaeological sites of Turkey. Travel by train, when and wherever possible.

Afterwards, either return to Perth, or your retirement years. You'll not regret it. :top:

There is an "unspoken" reason why, your Turkish "friends" are not residing in Turkey, themselves, eh?  And particularly so, regarding Retirement Health Care benefits, by comparison.

Thus, those same unspoken words to the wise, should be (abundantly) sufficient. :cool:

Many thank you for the tips; much appreciated; my Turkish friend has his reasons not to be residing in Turkey at the moment; he progressed his retirement plans really well and is waiting for the right time for him and his family; they have already purchased a nice villa in Fethyie but they don't seem very convinced with it... What would be the best time of the year to spend 4-6 weeks touring in Turkey. How is Bursa like as compared to the Province of Antalya. Any nice villages that you know in this area? Thanks and bye for now...

Hello fellow Australian,
Sorry we only know all the tourist sites, can't help!
We are retiring in Hungary, Budapest----in a few years time though----- as we have an apartment there and love the lifestyle and culture.  But we love Turkey too, it has been good to us, especially the kindness of the people. This side of the world is completely different to "OZZ" so you better spend a few months around here before you make up your mid as where to retire!

Many thanks Charlick; wishing you a delightful retirement in Budapest; so many wonderful places; what is your favorite spot in Turkey?

Sultanahmed-"old city", Göreme-"another planet?  Ephesus. To retire?  Izmir or Fatih?
Never been to Antalya  or surroundings as yet but seems too touristic even though a lot of "yabanci" live there.
The traffic in Istanbul is horrific even worth then in Bangkok, air pollution not as bad as some europian cities--some times--.The amount of "stray" animals will shock and sadden you but have to get used to it, also the rubbish where ever you go.  Shame they do not look after this beautiful country. But like I said before, the helpfulness and kindness of the Turkish people is unbelievable. I hope they never change!!!! We feel privileged to live here actually!  Best of luck what ever you decide.

Thank you Charlick for sharing your thoughts. Fully agree; a big city like Istanbul wouldn't be on our radar for retirement. Yes; Antalya city/town is very touristic; I spent 2 weeks there long time ago. I am attracted to Bursa from what I read about it. But, it seems to get very cold in winter. Will see... We hope to be able to visit Turkey by mid 2018. I heard from my Turkish friend that he feels that the country changed after the coup attempt. He said it affected the people some how. Another family friend has just returned from a short break in Istanbul. They loved it. They mentioned from discussions with Taxi drivers and a few Turkish people there that they are not very happy despite all the advancements that Turkey has achieved over the past 10-15 years. I don't understand why; for example, my Turkish friend would travel from Australia to Turkey so that he would enjoy a higher level of health care that he receives there. He also arranged/settled his government pension in Turkey with terms that cannot be matched in many advanced countries, including Australia. Not sure then why the Turkish people are not taking pride of Istanbul and keep it spotless clean. Maybe because the grass is always greener on the other side. If the remoteness and isolation of Western Australia was not an issue for us, we would have most probably not considered retirement elsewhere, so hope that the green grass theory is not applicable to us ;) Thanks once again and later ...

Neuromancer ~ I don't wish to come off as being argumentative, but are you claiming that Turkey (in reality) has a higher standard level of Medical "Facility" Care, than does Australia?

And yes, the "green-grass theory" does apply to you folks.  Welcome to the real world. The remoteness and isolation of Western Australia will prove to have been a godsend (in disguise), especially after you've experienced a couple years in the "lesson-learning" classrooms of the Istanbull/Mediterranean theatrical arena(s), vis_a_vis, "OZZ".

Well kRuben, you are wrong about the medical care here. from personal experiences in
emergency situations. AND in the "public" hospitals. Excellent care and highly professional,experienced doctors and nursing staff. No waiting for hours in the ER etc. AND I know what I am talking as I was in the medical profession in Australia for forty years! Plus, if you chose a private -care  here,the fees are much cheaper then in Australia and they are very good too. Why do you think the   "Medical Tourism"  is so popular??? and busy!!
"Green-grass" my foot! It is so much cheaper to live this side of the world and keep up your standard of living ----than in Australia,---
I wonder why you chose to live here in Turkey or if you don't, how can you criticize in such a derogatory way???  We are not wearing "rose colored glasses" but living here is a bliss especially the weather! and we have enough water even for the future years.
Anything else I can help you with?

Cannot really tell from personal experience but the fact that many Turkish/Australians would prefer to travel all the way from Australia to Turkey for medical consultation/treatment/surgery speaks for itself; I guess. However, this doesn't mean that the healthcare in Australia is too bad either.

charlick :

Well kRuben, you are wrong about the medical care here. from personal experiences in
emergency situations. AND in the "public" hospitals. Excellent care and highly professional,experienced doctors and nursing staff. No waiting for hours in the ER etc. AND I know what I am talking as I was in the medical profession in Australia for forty years! Plus, if you chose a private -care  here,the fees are much cheaper then in Australia and they are very good too. Why do you think the   "Medical Tourism"  is so popular??? and busy!!
"Green-grass" my foot! It is so much cheaper to live this side of the world and keep up your standard of living ----than in Australia,---
I wonder why you chose to live here in Turkey or if you don't, how can you criticize in such a derogatory way???  We are not wearing "rose colored glasses" but living here is a bliss especially the weather! and we have enough water even for the future years.
Anything else I can help you with?

Greetings Charlick ~ whatever floats your boat, in Turkey. First, I'm not being "derogatory" regarding Turkey. Sigh! Turkey is a great, welcoming country, especially for people coming from other Middle Eastern nations, and/or Africa.  However, the comparative "facts" speak for themselves. Obviously, our "singular", and comparatively more global experiences, are totally different than your's.

Based upon our own (open-minded) "comparative" experiences,  we are no longer residing in Turkey, but have opted for very affordable, very First World (infra-structured) Thailand; where the Pharmacists can actually speak the English language; the banks are open 7-days (11am-8pm); both Medical and Dental Care are top-shelf, and considerably less expensive than Turkey; and the 7-11(24/7) convenience stores, and Petrol/LPG stations abound (nation-wide).

Thai cuisine is absolutely awesome, and considerably less expensive than typically boring Turkish cuisine. And , no one cheats us on restaurant prices, because we are (non_Thai speaking) foreigners. Plus, there are a host of "International" cuisines available everywhere in Thailand (compared to Turkey), that are far beyond the KFC, BK and McD style menu items, as well.

Turkey bests Thailand only due to a more sophisticated mass transportation system and highway maintenance infra-structure. From an over-all lifestyle point of view, Turkey isn't even remotely on a par-level with, not only Thailand, but several other SE Asian locations, as well. In summary, the availability of goods and services available in Turkey, are very basic, at best, compared to Thailand. :cool: 

We're actually taken aback, that any Australian would choose "today's" very  paranoid Turkey, as an ultimate retirement location, especially considering the host of SE Asian (closer-to-home), more comprehensively (relaxed) location options available. Again, whatever floats your boat. Different strokes, for different folks, no doubt.  Best regards, and Bon Voyage in Turkey. :cheers:

Hi Charlick; hope you and all is well; when we visited Turkey in 1994, it didn't seem to be advanced; of course our visit was long time ago, and we never had the chance to visit again since; we don't really want to retire in a place where there is a big gap between the have and have not; we have been studying the numbers about achievements in Turkey over the past 15 years, and we find to good to be true; a question please, which you may or may not be able to help us with, but thanking you in advance for any feedback that you may have: how big do you feel the gap between the 'have a lot' and have 'none' in Turkey? Thanks once again Charlick!

Sorry can't help you there.The only thing is for sure, it is far better here than in the Philippines and India. The only people I have seen begging were the gypsies and some syrian kids. Every country has their rich and poor, homeless and beggars, we seen them in European countries, in Asia and in the US and even in Australia. It depends of what you want to see and where you live, I guess  .But this country has some"magical"powers, ---we are not he only ones saying it though and tried to analyse as to what it is?? --- And probably this is why people are fascinated by Turkey.

Indeed; we hope to visit Turkey by mid-2018; we can't wait!

Hi there; out of interest; how much does it cost to have full Health insurance in Turkey for expats/retirees, including hospital cover? Thank you.

neuromancer :

Hi there; out of interest; how much does it cost to have full Health insurance in Turkey for expats/retirees, including hospital cover? Thank you.

Hi there! Certainly, a Health Care Insurance "provider" would be your best information source, in that regard. :cool:

We are not in Turkey and do not know Turkish; search on the internet wasn't very helpful but an article mentioned that it could be thousands of dollars per annum

neuromancer :

We are not in Turkey and do not know Turkish; search on the internet wasn't very helpful but an article mentioned that it could be thousands of dollars per annum

Trust the article you've read. Turkey ain't cheap, particularly considering the quality levels of what you actually get, for the money spent, compared to several other retirement location options, particularly available to Aussies.

Research your options. You might be pleasantly surprised, at what you'll discover. :cheers:

Thank you. We still have plenty of time to research and decide. There are so many good places to choose from and try. We are fascinated by Turkey and like its central location and weather. So, it might be worse the extra dollar. Will see... Anyone else can advise on the cost of Health insurance, including Hospital cover in Turkey, or can guide us to a website of a Turkish Insurance company in English? Thanks!

expatarrivals.com/turkey/healthcare-in-turkey

This is the article I was referring to in my earlier post!

Found this
http://www.groupama.com.tr/en/content.a … mp;P_Id=64

As far as I understand, over 65 years of age you do not have to pay Health İnsurance if you have a residency visa. "August 5, 1014    General Directorate of Migration "

Thank you

FYI~ There is a reason for the rapidly increasing population of Turkish (Expat) Retirees, to SE Asia.

Turkish Airlines (3 X daily) flights, from Istanbul-to-Bangkok, are usually fully booked, two-weeks, in advance.

Conversely, there is always "last-minute' available seating, on TA flights from Bangkok-to-Istanbul. :cool:

Hello neuromancer, just to answer two questions.
No:1 the gap between the haves and have nots in huge.
No:2 my compulsory travel/ medical insurance per year is 286₺ without repatriation or burial if you die. The policy doesn't actually cover anything you might actually need. The traffic insurance of the guilty party in an accident, which  is compulsory when you own a vehicle, will cover you if you are injured in a traffic accident though.

POINT NO:3 I have lived here in Turkey since 1987 and seen alot of change. Up until the Immigration Office was formed here in 2015 expats were issued residence permits by the police headquarters and the Law No:6458 on   Foreigners and International Protection has protected me fully. But now the immigration office has taken over this job and appears to be using Law 5683 (asylum related) as the basis for any incident that a foreigner becomes involved in. The residence permit that is issued by them is meaningless as they can, without giving any reason, take it back and deport you. If you want more detailed info about the incident I was involved in that has made me decide to leave here I will send it in a PM.


I love Turkey, it's people, the varying highlands, never ending riding across the  beautiful country meeting endless people from all walks of live with or without education but with hearts filled with generousity, (I have ridden my motorbike solo for more than 425,000k all over Turkey), the weather, the food and my accomadation at present.


BUT it's time to leave here. It is a political problem and I feel uncomfortable. I will visit as a tourist as tourists are actually MORE VALUABLE in the governments eyes at present. When, and if, the protection law is put back into use and actually protects expats then I will come back.

   

I love Turkey, it's people, the varying highlands, never ending riding across the country (I have ridden my motorbike solo for more than 425,000k all over Turkey), the weather, the food and mostly my accomadation at present.
BUT it's time to leave here. It is a political problem but I feel uncomfortable. I will visit as a tourist as tourists are actually MORE VALUABLE in the governments eyes at present. When, and if, the protection law changes back and actually protects expats then I will come back.

Hi Bookwormslc, many thanks for sharing your thoughts and very sorry to hear that you experienced a very unpleasant incident, it seems. Thirty years is very long time. You must be sad leaving your home in Turkey. Why didn’t you become a Turkish citizen after all these years living in Turkey?

When you mention that the gap between the have and have not is huge in Turkey, it reminds me of Thailand. Is it that bad in Turkey in this regard? As I understand from some Turkish friends in Australia, education, Health care and medicine are all free for the Turkish people and that the level of these services offered is reasonable. One of my Turkish friends who lived away from Turkey in Australia for almost all his life mentioned that he paid $29k AUD as a national insurance contribution/balance and now he gets about 600 Euros monthly pension (don’t remember the exact figure). He is not 55 years old yet. He also mentioned that if he works in Turkey or elsewhere his pension will not be affected. It sounds more generous than some western countries.

I have no clue what the protection law is; however, after 30 years in Tukey, in my eyes you are Turkish and should have been granted the Turkish citizenship many years ago, and should be protected in the same way as any other citizen. Having said that, today on the BBC, it was mentioned that Turkey received more than 3 million refugees from all sorts of life. This is a huge number. Perhaps their residence permit is what you are referring to as can be revoked any time. Not sure, but after 30 years in Turkey, I don’t think this would be the case for you. As I said before, after 30 years living in Turkey, you should be considered Turkish, and from what you said, you are accepted by, and in love with, the Turkish people. I believe that you should take your case to a higher authority.

My only concern moving to Turkey is that it is located too close to the most volatile region in the world seems to be interested in for one reason or another. My concern is that things may escalate, especially as we approach 2023, and it will become 100 years since the Treaty of Lausanne, with whatever secret clauses that might be revealed then, together with the necessary changes that Turkey may rightfully have to take in order to protect the environment in Istanbul, their people and country in general... However, I don’t think we will be moving before then so let us just wait and see!

Thank you once again for sharing your thoughts, and wishing you a long and happy life wherever you decide to live.

Most of my family there when my mum passes away in Australia I want to retire in Turkey it would
cheaper then Australia right now I am 57 I probably have maybe another 15 or 20 years left in my life where I am there is no neighbourhood if you die nobody no here that's just a thought

New topic