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Naturalisation and citizenship in France

Hello everyone,

What are the requirements for acquiring citizenship in France? For example, length of residence, language requirements, employment etc..

What formalities are involved in the process?

What is the policy on dual-citizenship in France? Do you have to give up your former nationality?

What are the advantages and benefits of acquiring French citizenship, in your opinion?

Thank you for sharing your experience.

Bhavna

I was naturalised long ago, and did so via family ties and as a native speaker, so it was easy then, just a formality. I understand it is harder now but can't speak to that.

Advantage is you are citizen where you live, you can vote, you are completely part of the community. Can't think of any disadvantages.

I have three nationalities (France/Ireland/US) but only the French passport isn't expired. So, no requirement to give up your other citizenship(s) that I know of.

Cheers.

Im not yet a french national.. i'll be processing mine soon...I would highly appreciate  If theres someone here who just naturalized recently.. could share his/her journey! Thank you :)

Hello
Minimum 4-5 year spend in Frances as a work permit and you can apply for 5-10 year card with your last 5 year taxpayer documents. Off course language is a big barrier but it's possible after taking French lessons

Hi everyone, I am in process of requesting naturalisation. 
I'm British and I confirm that it is possible to have dual nationality (if it wasn't, I would not give up my GB passport !).   I had to pass a French test which cost 110€ - wasn't too complicated but then I have lived in France for 23 years. 
In February went to see to the 'Pimms' association in Lyon and I have an appointment with them on 12th October (8 months delay).  If I produce all of the required documents on that day they will then submit my request to the Prefecture, if there are any documents missing I will have to start all over again.  I was informed that it could take up to 2 years to get an appointment with the Prefecture.
That  is the maximum delay but I don't actually think it takes that long for Europeans'.

Nice2ksr :

Hello
Minimum 4-5 year spend in Frances as a work permit and you can apply for 5-10 year card with your last 5 year taxpayer documents. Off course language is a big barrier but it's possible after taking French lessons

I was told last year that the work permit doesn't count if you're only "travailleur temporaire" -- I've been here almost 6 years and I've had a job at a university for the past 3 years. I was told these years don't count towards my 5 years necessary to apply for a 5 - 10 year card because it is only a temporary CDD with my temporary visa. They told me I have to have a CDI for those years to count.

Maybe someone could clarify?

I'm really thinking about applying. So far, naturalization seems much easier than a 10-year visa (from what I understand, the department in charge of cartes des sejours is different from the department in charge of naturalization).

I've been here almost 6 years. I was PACsed for 4.5 years but have been single again for a year. I was an assistant for 1 year in a lycée, a "lecteur" for 2 years at a university. I've done my Master's degree here at a French university and I'm now a "professor" at the same university -- I don't have a Ph.D. and I am not a "maitre de conference" so I am unlikely to ever get a CDI.

What's holding me back is that I've heard very conflicting information about applying -- namely that you NEED a CDI to have an actual chance, even though the official government website indicates that this is not obligatory.
I am employed as a professor but it is only a half-time CDD. I do enough overtime that I work just under full time. Due to budget restrictions, they are unlikely to give me a full time contract for a few years at least.

I go through constant nervousness every year ... I do not want to leave France.

If anyone has any experience or thoughts, I'd be interested.

My husband is British and I'm French so I found this link to get started
https://www.service-public.fr/particuli … oits/F2726

Citizenship is time consuming only if concerned about time.
Take your time.
I never knew my lineage until late in life.
If known earlier I would have become citizen sooner.
No one was proud of our lineage.
Except I am very Proud to be majority French.
My last lineage name is Bonaparte.
Yes I am 7th great grandson of King Louise Philippe Bonaparte. Sad few understand history  but I am proud of France. Nation gas come far from such horrible events.

chuisfree :

What's holding me back is that I've heard very conflicting information about applying -- namely that you NEED a CDI to have an actual chance, even though the official government website indicates that this is not obligatory. .

Hi,
I also heard this CDI story, I worked as Profession Liberal for 4 years and paid URSRAFF and impots.
I stopped working to following my Project Professional (from teaching business english to being a french secretary - my metier) . All my formations via Pole Emploi where indemnified. Submitted all this proof of my activities...so im hoping for the best. (Im currently Pacs too). I think the major thing is they dont want a person sucking the system - RSA/CAF housing etc.... to be financially stable.

I currently have a 10-year residence card, and I applied for Naturalisation in Bouches-du-Rhone in March2017 and have my 1st RDV on 30 August.

If you remind me near end of August, I can tell you what they say with my chances of applying.

Regards,

deleted - replied to first post

Bhavna :

Hello everyone,

What are the requirements for acquiring citizenship in France? For example, length of residence, language requirements, employment etc..

What formalities are involved in the process?

What is the policy on dual-citizenship in France? Do you have to give up your former nationality?

What are the advantages and benefits of acquiring French citizenship, in your opinion?

Thank you for sharing your experience.

Bhavna

Hi Bhavna,

The requirements and formalities can be found on https://www.immigration.interieur.gouv. … -francaise

****NOTE each prefecture in each department is run different, so definitely check with your prefecture.

Length of residence before apply for Naturalization can also be seen on above link, as there are different conditions for different circumstances.

Dual-citizenship is OK. Just get ask your country of birth embassy for a retention of citizenship letter before applying for nationality.

I will leave advantages and benefits to someone else to answer!

Have a good day.

I began the process 2 years ago by applying to take a French language exam. Duly passed that in October 2015.

Then began preparing all the required documentation including various birth and marriage certificates, application form, proof of income etc..

Once all was in place I applied for an appointment at the prefecture. In the Midi Pyrenees you have to present your dossier in person at an organised rdv. I tried for 2 months to get an appointment (you can only apply online). Finally got a date - over a year away! During that year I kept trying for an earlier meeting but never got offered any other dates!

In May I went to hand in my papers and have the interview. My slot was for 1.5 hours but ended up lasting 3. I was missing a couple of translations (they were not asked for in the required list but needed all the same). Luckily I was told I could post them in when they were ready. At the end of the interview I was told it would take up to a year before I heard anything.

The end of the following week I was called for an interview at the local police station and the next week they visited my house.

Since then I have heard nothing and don't expect to for another 10 months. Keeping my fingers crossed!

Quite happy to help out if anyone needs assistance with their application (but bear I'm mind I have only experienced the Toulouse prefecture process).

I need your help but since you are at Toulouse, im in ile de France Yvelines, i surgest you w'ont be able to help me out.

I will tell my Friends, if any of them will need your help.
Thank you

But do you know anybody in Île de France that can help out fir the French nationality?

Sorry I don't. Your prefecture website should describe the procedure there. It shouldn't be much different to Toulouse, where they tend to differ is whether or not you can make the initial submission by post or drop it off, then wait to be called for interview. It used to be like that in Toulouse but now you have to make a rendezvous. The paperwork required should be pretty consistent across France.

Thank you for your reply.

judgenic: what are the question's they'll asked u in the prefecture? can you can pls share with us? thank you! :)

My questions were limited as we spent so much time going through my finances! I will also include those asked of my wife later the same day:

What does it mean to be French?
Name the last two presidents.
Name a French King.
         What was his family name?
         What was his nickname?
What is Bordeaux famous for?
Why do you want to be French?
What societies do you belong to?
Describe the structure of the French government.
Who created the fifth republic.

I think that was pretty much it.

thank you! it helps alot to me :)

My husband and I want to take French nationality but it seems to be a Catch 22 situation I that we need an interview to deliver our ‘dossier’ and there are no interviews. I go on the Toulouse website every day looking for cancellations but no luck. Is there another way? When we got our cartes de séjour at the Prefecture in Toulouse we asked about the process for gaining French nationality and they seemed rather vague and told us to look on line. Any help or advice would be welcome.

As far as I know that is the only way. I was lucky as I tried for about a week before being offered a date albeit over a year in the future!

Having been to the office in the prefecture I now know that if you go there without an appointment and knock on the door someone will come out to speak to you. If you are near Toulouse you could always try that and you may get lucky but I wouldn’t hold out too much hope.

A big problem is that the language certificate is only valid for 2 years so you could pass that and then not get an appointment in time. Alternatively you could wait for an appointment and then do the test but there may not be enough time.

There are allegedly 5 agents at any one time and they each have a maximum of 4 appointments per day. However when I was there I saw no more than 3 people go in during the morning for what should have been 10 slots. Someone else turned up for a short notice appointment (presumably a cancellation) but they had not rung in to confirm they were taking the slot so we’re turned away! If their hit rate is as low as 30% as this suggests that gives a maximum of 30 a week so 1500 a year without allowing for holidays, sickness etc.! While I was there they had someone who was on a second visit due to missing paperwork so that means even fewer ‘new’ applications. Also the same team deal with naturalisations through marriage.

All in all the odds are stacked against us but you can get there if you try as often as you can. Door knocking may at least allow you to ask when they open up new appointment slots so you can be online at the optimum time.

Sorry I can’t be more positive.

It may be a similar situation for getting appointments online in Montpellier - they automatically add new ones each week, so try Sunday night at midnight!

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