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I would like your opinion!!-“SUPERVISOR/CAPTAIN-United Express

In MY opinion, this is a perfect example of a very lazy and incompetent “SUPERVISOR called a CAPTAIN”.  Where was the captain?   Why was he not informed?  He did not train his crew to inform hen thee is a problem.  He was probably sitting on his butt drinking coffee or chit chatting with the stewardesses.   Who should be FIRED is the CAPTAIN.  Total GROSS NEGLIGENCE.  The captain should have offered US$5,000 to get someone else to “VOLUNTEER” to leave the plane even if the Captain had to pay the money himself.

This is the exact type of stupidity that is allowed by major companies.  The supervisor does NOT take responsibility for their actions or lack of actions.



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http://enews.earthlink.net/article/us?g … a4b0302a9a


Dragging video could invite backlash against United Airlines

This Sunday, April 9, 2017, image made from a video provided by Audra D. Bridges shows a passenger being removed from a United Airlines flight in Chicago. Video of police officers dragging the passenger from an overbooked United Airlines flight sparked an uproar Monday on social media, and a spokesman for the airline insisted that employees had no choice but to contact authorities to remove the man. (Audra D. Bridges via AP)

By CARYN ROUSSEAU and DON BABWIN
From Associated Press
April 11, 2017 11:46 AM EST

CHICAGO (AP) — Minutes after a passenger recorded a video showing security officers dragging a man off an overbooked United Express flight at O'Hare Airport, a smaller snippet of video showed another troubling scene.

There stood the passenger who had been dragged on his back to the front of the plane, appearing dazed as he spoke through bloody lips and blood that had spilled onto his chin.
"I want to go home, I want to go home," he said.

The treatment of the passenger on Sunday night drew outrage and scorn on social media and anger among some of the passengers on the flight as the unidentified man was thrown off the plane. The video seen around the world could prompt a backlash against United from passengers as the busy summer travel season begins.

And for Chicago, it is another public-relations nightmare, adding to its reputation as a city unable to curb a crime wave in some neighborhoods.
The furor grew from a common air travel issue — an overbooked flight. United was trying to make room for four employees of a partner airline, meaning four people had to get off the flight to Louisville.
At first, the airline asked for volunteers, offering $400 and then when that didn't work, $800 per passenger to relinquish a seat. When no one voluntarily came forward, United selected four passengers at random.

Three got off the flight, but the fourth, a man who said he was a doctor and needed to get home to treat patients on Monday, refused.

Three men, identified later as Chicago Aviation Department security officers, got on the plane. Two officers tried to reason with the man before a third came aboard and pointed at the man "basically saying, 'Sir, you have to get off the plane,'" said Tyler Bridges, a passenger whose wife, Audra D. Bridges, posted a video on Facebook.

One of the security officers could be seen grabbing the screaming man from his window seat, across the armrest and dragging him down the aisle by his arms.

Other passengers on Flight 3411 are heard saying, "Please, my God," ''What are you doing?" ''This is wrong," ''Look at what you did to him" and "Busted his lip."

"We almost felt like we were being taken hostage," said Tyler Bridges. "We were stuck there. You can't do anything as a traveler. You're relying on the airline."

United Airlines' parent company CEO Oscar Munoz issued a letter late Monday defending his employees, saying the passenger was being "disruptive and belligerent."

While Munoz said, he was "upset" to see and hear what happened, "our employees followed established procedures for dealing with situations like this."

Chicago's Aviation Department said the security officer who grabbed the passenger had been placed on leave.

"The incidence on United Flight 3411 was not in accordance with our standard operating procedure and the actions of the aviation security officer are obviously not condoned by the department,' the agency said in a statement.

After a three-hour delay, United Express Flight 3411 took off without the man aboard.

Airlines are allowed to sell more tickets than seats on the plane. They routinely overbook flights because some people do not show up.

It's not unusual for airlines to offer travel vouchers to encourage people to give up their seats, and there are no rules for the process. When an airline demands that a passenger give up a seat, the airline is required to pay double the passenger's one-way fare, up to $675 provided the passenger is put on a flight that arrives within one to two hours of the original. The compensation rises to four times the ticket price, up to $1,350, for longer delays.

When they bump passengers, airlines are required to give those passengers a written description of their compensation rights.

Last year, United forced 3,765 people off oversold flights and another 62,895 United passengers volunteered to give up their seats, probably in exchange for travel vouchers. That's out of more than 86 million people who boarded a United flight in 2016, according to government figures. United ranks in the middle of U.S. carriers when it comes to bumping passengers.

ExpressJet, which operates flights under the United Express, American Eagle and Delta Connection names, had the highest rate of bumping passengers last year. Among the largest carriers, Southwest Airlines had the highest rate, followed by JetBlue Airways.
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Associated Press Writer David Koenig in Dallas contributed to this report.
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Lawyer: Dragged passenger lost 2 teeth and broke his nose

Crystal Pepper daughter of Dr. David Dao accompanied by attorney Stephen Golan, speaks at a news conference Thursday, April 13, 2017, in Chicago. Dao a passenger dragged from a United Express flight Sunday April 9, 2017, suffered a "significant" concussion and broken nose, and he lost two front teeth, attorney Thomas Demetrio said Thursday. Dao was removed from the plane after he refused to give up his seat on the full flight from Chicago to Louisville to make room for four crew members. (AP Photo - Teresa Crawford)
By DON BABWIN and SARA BURNETT
From Associated Press
April 13, 2017 3:44 PM EST

CHICAGO (AP) — The passenger dragged from a United flight lost two front teeth and suffered a broken nose and a concussion, his lawyer said Thursday, accusing the airline industry of having "bullied" its customers for far too long.

"Are we going to continue to be treated like cattle?" attorney Thomas Demetrio asked.
The passenger, Dr. David Dao, has been released from a hospital but will need reconstructive surgery, Demetrio said at a news conference, appearing alongside one of Dao's children. Dao was not there.
The 69-year-old physician from Elizabethtown, Kentucky, was removed by police from the United Express flight Sunday at Chicago's O'Hare Airport after refusing to give up his seat on the full plane to make room for four airline employees.

Cellphone video of him being pulled down the aisle on his back and footage of his bloody face have created a public-relations nightmare for United.

One of Dao's five children, Crystal Pepper, said the family was "horrified, shocked and sickened" by what happened. She said it was made worse by the fact that it was caught on video.
For Dao, who came to the U.S. after fleeing Vietnam by boat in 1975 when Saigon fell, being dragged off the plane "was more horrifying and harrowing than what he experienced in leaving Vietnam," Demetrio said.

Demetrio, who indicated Dao is going to sue, said the industry has long "bullied" passengers by overbooking flights and then bumping people, and "it took something like this to get a conversation going."

"I hope he becomes a poster child for all of us. Someone's got to," the lawyer said.
Early on, United CEO Oscar Munoz added to the furor when he apologized for the incident but accused Dao of being belligerent. Later, Munoz offered a more emphatic mea culpa, saying, "No one should ever be mistreated this way."

He promised to review the airline's policies to make sure something like that never happens again, and said United will no longer use police to remove bumped passengers. The airline also said all passengers on the flight would get a refund.

In a statement issued immediately after Thursday's news conference, United insisted that Munoz and the airline called Dao numerous times to apologize. Munoz himself said on Wednesday that he had left a message for Dao.

But Demetrio said neither Dao nor his family had heard from United.

Demetrio said his client accepts the apology. But the attorney questioned its sincerity, suggesting United acted because it was taking a PR "beating."

The attorney was unable to say precisely how Dao was injured. Dao didn't remember exactly what occurred because of the concussion he suffered, Demetrio said.

Pepper said her father and mother had been traveling from California to Louisville, Kentucky, and had caught a connecting flight at O'Hare. After what happened, Dao "has no interest in ever seeing an airplane" and will probably be driven to Kentucky, Demetrio said.

United had selected Dao and three other passengers at random for removal from the plane after unsuccessfully offering $800 in travel vouchers and a hotel stay to customers willing to give up their seats.

The three officers who removed Dao have been suspended from their jobs at the Chicago Aviation Department.

At a City Council committee hearing Thursday, aldermen ripped officials from United and the department about the episode.

"There are no excuses," Alderman Michael Zalewski said.

John Slater, a United vice president, said that bumping passengers to accommodate airline employees happens infrequently, and that federal guidelines requiring rest for crew members made it necessary to get the employees on the Sunday flight to Louisville.

The Aviation Department's roughly 300 officers guard the city's two main airports but are not part of the regular Chicago police force, receive less training and cannot carry guns inside the terminals.
"To be quite frank, Chicago employees should not be doing the dirty work for the friendly skies airline," said Alderman Ed Burke, who played video of Dao being removed.

Aviation Commissioner Ginger Evans told the committee that the officers had the authority to board the flight but that what happened on the plane is being investigated.



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I WILL ASK PAUL TO POST THE PICTURES BECAUSE i HAVE TRIED AND IT VERY COMPLICATED FOR ME.  Need some it brain power!!!!

Have a GREAT day and Happy Easter!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

New airline safety video

https://streamable.com/xh1q1

On a more serious note...

The captain is responsible for his aircraft and all actions aboard so  has direct responsibility for any crimes committed by staff.

There could be more to the story than we've seen but I have to question why breaking his nose and knocking two teeth was a required reply to a passenger refusing to give up his seat because an airline couldn't do their job properly and disregarded their duty to a paying passenger because they couldn't sort out their own business properly.
If they were any good, they'd manage get flight crew to the right places without beating up doctors.

The captain should be in court, as should the security staff and management.

This could also be a pretty serious expat issue as the victim was an expat.
One has to consider the possibility the security staff were emboldened by what seems to be a growing racism problem in some countries.
I suppose the next question has to be how random the random selection was, and who decided a passenger who had paid for his flight and didn't seem to be the cause of any problems could be removed from an aircraft with such force.

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