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Immigrants from Venezuela

Just read that the national oil company, PDVSA, did not make an interest payment of over $400,000,000 on 11/22/16,.  They do have a 30 day window, and supposedly some debt restructuring will free up more cash for interest payments.  Since 95% of Venezuela exports are gas and oil, a default would cause chaos.  I was wondering if anyone on the ground in Ecuador has seen any increase in expats coming from Venezuela.   In 2015 it seemed like a high percentage of new members of the forum were from Venezuela.  It would appear that anyone with a Venezuela passport could come to Ecuador very easily.

I haven’t seen them personally.

Last year, as you alluded, there was a tremendous increase in new members on the Ecuador sites of expat.com -- especially noticeable on the Spanish-language EC site.  They wanted out of Venezuela .. and fast.

However, many of these good folks did not have a clue how to get permanent residency in Ecuador, which -- for working-age Venezuelans and other such extranjeros -- typically requires a job-offer/official contract.

Back in the day, there was closeness between the two countries’ presidentes, but since Hugo Chavez’s death, things have been downhill for Venezuela.  With the possible exception of Spanish-language medical personnel and a small percentage of Vens with Ecuador job contracts, it seems unlikely that immigration here is a solution for the preponderance of those seeking to flee permanently from “the South American country where it’s all gone wrong.”

cccmedia in Quito

I’ve remember reading an article with statistics that stated that almost all or about 98% of arriving Venezuelans depart from Ecuador. Another piece stated that of those that remain about 75% are skilled individuals with job contracts. So, what ccc wrote correlates with that info, in that they arrive find it difficult to find a job and residency, and eventually move on. From a personal perspective, I know a few, two I met recently who live on my street, and work here legally, friendly people. Another one I’m limiting communication with because it always leads to her complaining about earning less than the básico. She doesn't have a college degree, doesn't have a work visa, and what does she or other people in her situation expect. So she'll probably join the others and eventually move on as well.

Venezuela’s Currency Just Had the Biggest Monthly Collapse Ever

The ‘strong bolivar’ has lost 45% of its value this month

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles … lapse-ever



Venezuela Currency Loses 45% This Month as Hyperinflation Escalates
The Venezuelan bolivar lost 45% of its value against the US dollar so far this month, the biggest monthly decline ever.

Officially it takes 10 bolivars to buy a US dollar. On the black market it takes 2,753 bolivars to buy a US dollar.

The bolivar is all but worthless. This is the classic definition of hyperinflation.

https://mishtalk.com/2016/11/24/venezue … escalates/


:(

gardener1 :

Venezuela’s Currency Just Had the Biggest Monthly Collapse Ever

The ‘strong bolivar’ has lost 45% of its value this month

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles … lapse-ever



Venezuela Currency Loses 45% This Month as Hyperinflation Escalates
The Venezuelan bolivar lost 45% of its value against the US dollar so far this month, the biggest monthly decline ever.

Officially it takes 10 bolivars to buy a US dollar. On the black market it takes 2,753 bolivars to buy a US dollar.

The bolivar is all but worthless. This is the classic definition of hyperinflation.

https://mishtalk.com/2016/11/24/venezue … escalates/


:(

Scary stuff, sounds like Germany during the depression, takes a bag of money to buy a bag of food.  This can't end well, 400% inflation for the year.

This is an on the ground update about Venezuelans in Quito. Do keep in mind this is my opinion as a resident of this city. This past month four Venezuelans that I knew have moved on. Two worked in the food and beverage industry and them moving on is quite understandable. But two other Venezuelans on my block who have been here less than six months also moved on. The only evidence of them leaving is an arriendo sign on their once occupied apartment. This is quite strange because a deposit is a lot of money to forfeiture (and I know they did) especially for many migrants from Venezuela. An Ecuatoriano friend speculates that they left because the area is too pricey for them and have probably found their way and moved to a cheaper neighborhood, that’s plausible.

Personally all this movement has made me reflect on the suspicions that Ecuatorianos have about such migratory people. These folk are essentially strangers and it’s difficult to trust people like that because one day they are here and the next they vanish into the night. I’m not saying everyone, but the numbers of people leaving surely give me the right to generalize.

So what’s the point of this post. I would rather trust someone who has a stable life than someone who is moving on and ecuatorianos see this everyday hence their reluctance to trust foreigners.

So a friend of mine (Ecuatoriano) made an observation, which in fact is kind of true (because not all Venezuelans are alike financially). Some Venezuelans despite earning a basic salary seem to be living it up during the weekends. They're not drinking the cheap stuff.

I think they are receiving remittances from Venezuelans abroad to subsidize their budgets here. I personally know some who migrated from here to developed countries and it explains lifestyles.

Perhaps there will be more auto workers available soon.

It doesn't really matter the trend is established and consistent. Simply put, Venezuelans come here, they find out the hard way they cant sustain a decent quality of life and move on. This is a palanca society, one where a person doesn't get a job beyond basic salary unless they have connections, or there's a need, like doctors for example.

Here is an update on Venezuelans in Ecuador. Many continue to arrive but the overwhelming majority leave. Where do they go? Some to Europe, a lot to other South American countries, Peru, Chile and Uruguay are quite popular. Peru I believe granted temporary residency  to many of them lately. The ones that remain work in all sectors and some have opened their own businesses catering to locals and other Venezuelans.

Initially I wasn’t too fond of them but that’s because I was comparing them to locals. And the difference is night and day with Ecuadorians being much simpler and friendlier (IMO), and Venezuelans having big-city mentalities. But that’s just who they are, so after becoming accustomed to their demeanor I realized they are okay. Also poor or not, Venezuelans are not simple people, and perhaps because only 5 or so years ago Venezuela was the richest country in South America.

But yeah they are everywhere; they are resourceful, creative, and friendly in their own way.

vsimple :

Here is an update on Venezuelans in Ecuador. Many continue to arrive but the overwhelming majority leave. Where do they go? Some to Europe, a lot to other South American countries, Peru, Chile and Uruguay are quite popular. Peru I believe granted temporary residency  to many of them lately. The ones that remain work in all sectors and some have opened their own businesses catering to locals and other Venezuelans.

Initially I wasn’t too fond of them but that’s because I was comparing them to locals. And the difference is night and day with Ecuadorians being much simpler and friendlier (IMO), and Venezuelans having big-city mentalities. But that’s just who they are, so after becoming accustomed to their demeanor I realized they are okay. Also poor or not, Venezuelans are not simple people, and perhaps because only 5 or so years ago Venezuela was the richest country in South America.

But yeah they are everywhere; they are resourceful, creative, and friendly in their own way.

Years ago when hanging around Panama more I saw the well-dressed Venezuelan lawyers (?) opening bank accounts in Panama City.  (Good planning, BTW)  They were a bit "abrupt" and pushy (my impressions confirmed by my Panamanian friends).   But, even then there seemed to be a sense of urgency way back then.  Then again, I sympathize with anyone on any kind of schedule dealing with Panamanian workers day in and day out!  LOL

What I like about some Venezuelans is that they are enterprising. One has been here a year and is starting a second business. Small scale businesses but nevertheless that is quite impressive. With regards to "abrupt" definitely, and some are also demanding  I asked one friend why she left her boyfriend and she replied along the lines of lo que pasa es que es muy lento en todo y a mí me gusta rápido ahora ( the dude is slow in everything and I like it fast now [achieving things]). Ajajaja this is different from the general mindset of Ecuadorians who are more patient IMO.

I have a friend from Venezuela that just moved to Ecuador, Quito. No one wants to hire her because she is Venezuelan. Does anyone have any tips? She is not good with English and because she just arrived she doesn't have her papers in order yet. As in no visa and her country denied to give her a passport, all she was able to get was an extension of her current passport. She had to give up college because of the difficulties in Venezuela. Did what anyone else did and moved from there.. She lives with her sister now but really needs a job and some pro tips on how to continue there.

Seriously any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.
Zeros.

vsimple :

What I like about some Venezuelans is that they are enterprising. One has been here a year and is starting a second business. Small scale businesses but nevertheless that is quite impressive. With regards to "abrupt" definitely, and some are also demanding  I asked one friend why she left her boyfriend and she replied along the lines of lo que pasa es que es muy lento en todo y a mí me gusta rápido ahora ( the dude is slow in everything and I like it fast now [achieving things]). Ajajaja this is different from the general mindset of Ecuadorians who are more patient IMO.

Wait until tomorrow vs I wanted it yesterday is always a difficult combination.

Zeros :

I have a friend from Venezuela that just moved to Ecuador, Quito. No one wants to hire her because she is Venezuelan. Does anyone have any tips? She is not good with English and because she just arrived she doesn't have her papers in order yet. As in no visa and her country denied to give her a passport, all she was able to get was an extension of her current passport. She had to give up college because of the difficulties in Venezuela. Did what anyone else did and moved from there.. She lives with her sister now but really needs a job and some pro tips on how to continue there.

Seriously any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.
Zeros.

Employers are reluctant to hire a Venezuelan without at least a Unasur visa because of the huge supply of workers. It’s a straightforward visa for Venezuelans to get so she should at least apply for that.

Previously it was easy enough for them to find jobs even if underpaid but the reality is there are too many of them here.  She may very well have to resort to selling things on the street but may very well find out the fierce competition there as well and it’s certainly not something that anyone can do.

Peru is an option, a Venezuelan I know moved there  and said it's easier to find work and the people are nicer.

I'll let her know of that Unasur visa. To be honest hard or not she won't be able to move again. The trip from Venezuela to Ecuador was difficult enough :(

I can help her with a few hundreds $ if she would ever ask (never does even when I offered to) but that's not a life to live, she just needs a small job to get her through day to day and be able to make her work visa and go back to school...

Excuse my language, but some (not all) Ecuadorians seem quite racists, at least in the area she lives.

She went for a job interview where she took blood samples and other samples from a patient and prepared these to be evaluated by a specialist. But she was not allowed to work because they said she's a foreigner...

In the same manner one shouldn't judge Venezuelans based on their difficult circumstances it is also unfair to judge Ecuadorians based on a huge influx Venezuelans. It’s a difficult time for everyone but Ecuador has a humane society as is evidenced by the ease at which Venezuelans are able to 1.) obtain a visa 2.) get a job as there as thousands upon thousands with jobs.

Also understand that Venezuelans are very shrewd and they know everything about visas, work and residency here. I know this for a fact because I know Venezuelans in Quito. I know how they organize by way of social media with other Venezuelans who migrated here whether through family, friends or fellow students from Venezuelan universities.

Zeros :

she won't be able to move again. The trip from Venezuela to Ecuador was difficult enough :(

Dear Zeros,

Welcome to the Ecuador forum.

Your friend is up against too much competition in Ecuador.  The economy of Ecuador has been a mess for years.  A few days ago, I saw thousands of refugees lined up in a long queue at the Ecuadorian immigration building at the Ecuador-Colombia border -- where a police officer told me it was mostly Venezuelans.  Venezuelan refugees have been flooding into Ecuador and Colombia for months by the hundreds of thousands.

If your friend's attitude is as you described -- "she won't be able to move again.  The trip from Venezuela to Ecuador was difficult enough" -- that way of thinking doesn't cut it.


If she's able-bodied and young enough to work full-time and they're hiring Venezolanos in Lima, Peru .. she needs to fly or take buses to Lima. 

If she needs a little time to accept the facts and move past the denial-stage, so be it.

Peru is a peaceful country with a lot going for it.  The money you offered her is enough to get her there in style.

cccmedia near the Ecuador-Colombia border across from Tulcán, Ecuador

The Venezuelan situation is more serious than I have thought. My neighborhood has so many of them that they seem to outnumber the locals. I believe some live in my area especially the well-off, and we have to keep in mind that some of them have money (middle class, upper class). And as a matter of fact one of the first people that I met here was a Venezuelan executive neighbor and his wife. But anyhow there are just so many of them, and they seem to be increasing by the week.

A lot of them are street peddlers too, and to exasperate the situation it seems like almost all the waiters and waitresses are Venezuelans too. The other day an Ecuadorian was telling me in his neighborhood that almuerzo restaurant owners preferred hiring Venezuelans because an Ecuadorian would earn $15 for that shift, but Venezuelans settle for $5.

Let's hope that the situation in Venezuela improves because that is the only solution – them going back. Although it's probably doubtful as some Venezuelans say their country will end up like Cuba. I don't know about that.

I have nothing against Venezuelans, two of my language partners are Venezuelans, and I'm learning a lot of Spanish and culture, and they have definitely elevated my South America astuteness.

And it seems like Venezuelans prefer Quito, and if a resident from Guayaquil can give us some info about whether there are many of them down there then it would be much appreciated.

I think what makes Ecuador an attractive destination in general is that it is relatively short or a 3 day bus ride (different buses same company) from a Venezuelan border to the capital, and relatively cheap as a ticket costs $100. Also with the greenback being the local currency that in itself is appealing because of the exchange rate. Although some complain they lose 20% because of unfavorable rates when sending money home.

I was in Guayaquil for the last month. My Ecuadorian girlfriend lives there. Anecdotally: At most restaurants we visited, my girlfriend would remark that the accent sounded Venezuelan to her (my Spanish isn't developed enough to detect accents). Both of the Uber trips we took, our drivers told us they were from Caracas. I saw a new Venezuelan arepa shop under construction. I saw a few Venezuelan flags draped across tiendas and apartment buildings.

According to the Wikipedia article about the "Bolivarian diaspora", By 2018, about 4 million Venezuelans – more than 10% of the Latin American country's population – had emigrated from Venezuela following the Bolivarian Revolution.

So as of yesterday Chile requires Venezuelans to have a visa prior to entering the country. That's tough because that was one country that they desired migrating to because of it's economy. What makes matters worse for them is that Venezuelans who are currently in the country will need to leave and apply for a visa from outside of Chile.  One of the possible ramifications is that more will come here.

I had a very moving experience with my new friends from Venezuela here. 

I was singing at a restaurant owned by a young group of refugees and as a thank you I included as my finale a piece that I knew to be a classic Venezuelan song. What I didn't know was just how important that song was.  Think of someone singing America the Beautiful if you were a refugee from the USA and never knew if you were going back and what the future might bring.

So I sang Alma Llanera...

It was truly one of the most amazing experiences of my singing career. Everyone froze as they realized what song I was about to sing and between cheers and tears and a lot of live streaming we all made it to the end.

My heart hurts for my friends who have left family and friends behind to eke out a living.  Many have lost dear ones, loved ones, to lack of medicine and lack of food and riots.  It is a very sad situation.

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