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Future Expat in Cilegon Help!

Hello,

Has anyone had any experiences or knowlege of this area. My husband has been asked to do an expat assignment for 15 months and we are trying to become as informed as we can. The main office in Jakarta but the plant is being built in Cilegon so there are no previous expats to question and the few that are there now are still in Jakarta have not moved to Cilegon yet. We would appreciate any informatiion anyone might be able to share. I have lived abroad twice but since I am older this assignemnt is making me nervous and I don't know if I should go or stay behind.

We are in our mid 50's so of course health care is a concern as well as concerns about Dengue etc.
I have lived abroad twice and have experienced Hep A so I have food safety concerns. Are there any Super markets or Hypermarkets that that you can recommend?

We have been told we would live in a PCI home stay. We would have a driver..
I know we are limited to a number of hours we can use a driver on the weekends.  What would be some areas we could day trip too to escape the industrial environment.

When I lived in France, I attempted to do volunteer work but they seemed confused about my wanting to walk dogs and scoop for free,,, Are there any ways I can volunteer at a local school or church or other?

Thank you!
Annecy
USA

Make sure the work address on his work permit and KITAS are changed to suit.
The work permit allows work at the stated address, and no other.
The KITAS will then be dealt with at a new office for the area you move to.
The employer should take care of this.

Volunteer work.
Legally - no.
However immigration often allow native English speakers to wander around local schools as long as it's only the odd day without contract or pay. ("Transport money" isn't considered pay)
The only safe way is to tell immigration what you'd like to do and ask them if it's okay to do it.
They know local schools will go mad to get you to visit so they commonly allow it as long as it's one offs around different schools.
Whilst this is strictly illegal, the laws are designed to protect Indonesian workers and immigration know visits to schools will not take any work from locals, but  will help schools.

Doing any type of service work is likely to cause problems as you'd potentially be taking work from a local.

Dengue.
Anti mosquito creams will keep the little blighters away from you.
No worries there as long as you use it at night.

I believe Giant have a branch there but I don't know about the other supermarkets.
I do know there is a Carrefour and Spar in Serang, just a short drive away.

I think there is a range of supermarkets available.
Giant which is a standard basics range supermarket. There is a Hero in one of the malls there. Hero is more upmarket and will have a range of western foods at western prices but is very good.
Hypermart is available at the Supermall and that sells everything you can think of. Although western food types you need to hunt for but again it's very good.

The range of produce, meat, fish and dairy are all very good so you will be fine. Water comes in bottles and Aqua is the most safe brand to use.

Medicines are freely available and if you don't want generic you can pay for the proper name drugs. I am sure your husbands company will supply good health care.

You are not that far from Tangerang and BSD where the choice of supermarkets, fashion stores and the like is vast. Even IKEA if you must. You are also close to the coast and may hear krakatau booming at night.

It's hot and mosquito's annoy but dengue is prevented if you as Fred suggested but on lotion and you can spray rooms etc which will help.

Get away from Cilegon would be Carita, Bogor, jakarta, Sumatra, Bali, Java, mountains, Sumatra. All accessible easily by car depending on traffic.

Check Google maps for the city and also Freds photo journal on this site
You can try mylifejakarta.blogspot.com for more things to do.

It's more than worth coming to Indonesia but it can be a little overwhelming and adventurous at times but it's am amazing place to visit and stay.

Just to ad on Fred's first post. All he mentioned is correct, however make sure that your husband will really get his work permit from day one. Not that "they" say come over here and work and meantime we sort out.

It will not work and put you both at risk.

Your hubby should collect the so called "telex visa" overseas which entitled him to get a stay permit (KITAS). That said, it mean his work permit is arranged already.

Without work permit (IMTA) you are not allowed to work here on any available visa!!!

You as spouse then are eligible to also get a stay permit (KITAS) which has same validity.

You are officially not allowed to work not even volunteering (grey zone) so you have to watch out about your activities.

Even though you ask someone from Immigration in charge it does not mean you are OK, they will never give you something in writing which you may can use if you get caught.

The above is true, but local departments work together, nods and winks a plenty.
Even a little out of their home area is a big no.

Local departments may work together but is does not mean you are safe once others caught you.

Well that's more people scared off the forum. All the lady wanted was some positive vibes and insights.

I am sure the visa issues will be taken care of by her husband's company so why get so heavy straight away?

happyhour :

Local departments may work together but is does not mean you are safe once others caught you.

Within an area, once you've been told something is okay to do by a senior immigration official, they'll all respect each other's opinion.
Immigration and the police are the only people who have anything to do with this issue and they work closely with each other.
Been there, done that, and all is well as long as you're open and honest. That only applies to casual work that is helpful to Indonesians, doesn't take work from Indonesians, AND immigration say it's okay for you to do.
I used to visit police stations to give informal conversation lessons, something the OP could do without the slightest risk, as long as immigration know and ok it.
By the time you tell immigration, they'll know about it anyway.
You'll probably find the police or immigration people have kids at local schools, and they'll start inviting you.
Zero risk as the only people who can arrest you are the ones asking you to help out their kids.
I made some very good friends doing that, people I stayed in contact with all these years

Anything outside that is a very bad idea.

Wow... I am so appreciative of all your responses.
I want to hear the negative as much as the positive.
So far no one has scared me off.. My worst enemy is my OCD self:) I actually expected to hear run while you can... The expats that we know in Jakarta had rough starts, lots of stomach issues, one case of Dengue, one with a parasite but no one has baled and Still Surviving the "adventure"! 

I am fairly certain the work visa would be handled with my Husbands company.
In France I had to go to the Prefecture 3 times waiting in line for 4 hours each time to apply for my Visa.
It was a nightmare and by the time it was sorted out they needed us back stateside. I traveled back to the states every 3 months so it was never an issue as far as entering customs.
The reason I asked about doing something as a volunteer is I am not sure what I can participate in in the community... We were told by a cowoeker that in Jakarta an expat is part of the culture... Not so in Cilegon. His wife works long hours but I will be at home.  Is venturing out on my own safe? I love photography and wondering around taking pics..
What should I always keep on me as far as credentials?
Thanks for all the grocery store info...I shopped at Carrefour in France and they also had Sparr but in walking distance where I lived.. I also walked to a couple open air markets a couple times a week.

Thanks everyone!

Fred... That is so awesome that you were able to connect and make some lifelong friends.. My daughter is a new teacher who works with refugees and I really do think because of her experiences abroad she is more sensitive to their fears and struggles with a new culture, a new language and fitting in.

annecy :

Is venturing out on my own safe? I love photography and wondering around taking pics..
What should I always keep on me as far as credentials?
.

Most of Indonesia is pretty safe, but there are rules, more for women.
I'd avoid quiet areas at night, any back streets that look a bit dodgy, and red light areas.
I only observe my first rule, but a man is generally safer than a woman.
I had a minor issue on Sunday just north of Jakarta's old town. A couple of idiots drinking illegal booze were getting 'fruity', asking me for money. A stern look put them off their interest in my wallet, but that's because I'm big enough to back up my implied threat.
It's better for a lady alone to not be in such places. Saying that, nine years of wandering in such places has only seen a very few 'moments', so I maintain Indonesia is very safe.

http://www.expat.com/forum/viewtopic.ph … 573#527221

The only document you need to carry is your SKTT identity card, but a copy of your KITAS and passport (including visa page) never hurts. The chances of anyone asking you for it are pretty much zero, most officials assuming you're legal.
The only times I've heard of people being asked to prove their status is outside bars late at night/early morning, if someone thinks they look dodgy for any reason, or in banks until the staff get to know you.

annecy :

I am not sure what I can participate in in the community....

The answer is whatever immigration agree to.
They'll probably totally ignore you visiting school or helping out at poor orphanages, but always tell 
them before you do anything in order to stay safe.
There are basically two types of orphanages here; the first being the well funded places with sacks of cash, the second being very poor with bugger all.
No one is ever going to object to you donating sacks of rice or you making casual visits to help out for an hour or two from time to time. Ask around local mosques to find such places as most tend to be well hidden because it's cheaper to set up in villages than it is in a town.
You see how I define 'poor' if you find one.
Plenty of girls' homes around for you to visit, but skip the nice places as most have far more cash than you or I.
A nice little bonus to visiting orphanages is you'll get known in the community, and that brings friends.
Advice - keep donations small, perhaps a coup,e of sacks of rice each time or school stuff such as notepads and pencils.

As i understand she is not only looking for positive input only. I gave my input and thats it, dont intend to scare people off just emphazise from my own experience. She also highlighted that she believes the company her hubby is working for in Indonesia is taking care of the papers......but for me it sounds she does not really know.

I guess no one really knows. Every experience is different. And everyone reacts differently. Positive is the only way to look at it.

I challange it Luke, positive is not the only way to look at it as what you said.

I am the last one who want that people moving over here. But I can tell you for aure how many people got busted.

Many years i am into the business when it comes to work and stay permits, i know what i am talking about !!

I have a legal company, we are fully licensed but i just giving my input here to help people.

If it is not appreciated then fine for me....

happyhour :

She also highlighted that she believes the company her hubby is working for in Indonesia is taking care of the papers......but for me it sounds she does not really know.

This seems to be the case, but it is the norm for the company to take care of everything to do with work permits and KITAS.
They'll know because the company will ask for documents and they'll have to go to immigration for photographs and sign forms. The new stuff will have the new addresses on them.

lukereg :

Positive is the only way to look at it.

I agree.
Negative just brings worry and encourages you to think up problems that aren't there ... but I like to add a dash of checking just in case someone is out to spoil my day.
Not to the point where Black Sabbath would write a song about it, but just enough to know the positive vibes are going their stuff.

annecy :

Fred... That is so awesome that you were able to connect and make some lifelong friends.. My daughter is a new teacher who works with refugees and I really do think because of her experiences abroad she is more sensitive to their fears and struggles with a new culture, a new language and fitting in.

I did some casual work with refugees before I left the UK - very interesting stuff, and an education for me.
The papers talk some serious crap about refugees that's true of a tiny minority of them, but is a total lie about the vast majority. Working with them proved most are just people escaping especially stupid politicians' policies, or wars started by incredibly moronic politicians.
...and I met a lot of very nice people who told me a lot about their countries and cultures.
What to me was just a few hours a week of my time was massive to people with virtually nothing in a new country they knew little about.
It also proved handy for me as a new expat in a country I knew little of as their related experiences proves handy when it came to my new life.

Again Fred, my personal experience is different. How many MNC saying all docs ok no problem.....in the end nothing much in order. Come here first on Visa...xxx and we sort out later.

You get your work permit later on.....Well, Bali probably different ;-)

happyhour :

You get your work permit later on.....Well, Bali probably different ;-)

That contradicts every piece of information I have ever read.
You MUST get an IMTA in order to be eligible for the KITAS - anything else would be illegal.

However, the OP doesn't need to be concerned as she'll be doing no formal work so, assuming immigration are happy her proposal, it's a bit of a mute point in this case.
Immigration are very likely to tell her to do as she likes as far as the odd visits to schools and helping out in an orphanage from time to time goes because no one is hurt but Indonesians are helped by her activities.
Whilst such things are strictly illegal, immigration are the ones who decide what is and is not allowed, and they are very likely to decide it's legal as far as they're concerned, especially if she visits their kids' schools.

It is valid for her husband, but ALL documentation should be in order before engaging in any sort of formal work as anything else could lead to serious problems.
Her husband's absolutely has to check his documents are in order before he starts work.

Read up on UU 16/2015 and UU 35/2015, but the basics for the work permit (IMTA) are an educational background suitable to the job in hand, 5 years experience, and health insurance.
Once that's been issued, the KITAS (Immigration document) is pretty much a formality, but BOTH MUST be in place before starting work if you want to remain legal and safe.

Fred thats actually what I said from the beginning, you are right. Its just that we can hear often that on Bali things may be different and can be managed differently.

happyhour :

Fred thats actually what I said from the beginning, you are right. Its just that we can hear often that on Bali things may be different and can be managed differently.

Bali has very different problems to the rest of Indonesia, and I can easily see how things there might well end up being handled in a different way, even if the law says they can't.
We all know laws are open to the 'quirks' of local officials, so it isn't beyond possible there could end up being local differences in the legal status of expats and tourists.
Bali has already tried local restrictions and might very well do so again.

However, Bali has nothing to do with this thread, so perhaps it's better not to mention it again as far as this topic goes.

Agree.....lets leave Bali out of it. That was me who brought it in.....apology 😉

Probably we wait and see if/what OP is coming back with.

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