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Crossing the border at San Ysidro with two computers?

Hi there, I'm new to this forum and considering living in the Rosarito area and commuting occasionally across the border for work. My husband and I are both freelance. We work from home doing graphic design or video editing most of the time, but we both also travel occasionally for work. When I travel I have to bring at least two computers so I have a main and a backup. I read somewhere that the normal travel allowance only allows for bringing one computer. Is this really enforced? Any way around it? Also, if you could share how we obtain our visitors visa that allows us to stay for six months that would be great. We're planning on renting for now until we get to know the area.

So Let me make it easier. The first question is yes, we crossed many times with at least 2 computers , Kindles Cells, cables etc, and had no problem. They were all in standard carrying cases or backpacks. The only way you might have a problem would be if you were carrying equipment in boxes that make them look new. That's when they would question if you were bringing things for sale. If it looks like your personal equipment there should be no problem.

The visa is even easier , you get it when you cross. The Aduana decides how many days you can have, but they usually give you the standard 180 days. If you decide to travel into more interior areas you will have to get a refundable import fee for your car. So think about that. You can travel back and forth in only two states without an import tax. Stay in those states and you are good.

As you cross the border int Mexico  there is a stopping place for things to declare and adjacent to that is the office  that gives the  temporary  180 day visa.  The people at that  location will direct you to it.  You need your passport and about $30 (depending on the rate of exchange It will be given to you instantly. This is where you go to renew it also accessible from the Mexican side if entering as a pedestrian. I have been there since 2006 (no on hiatus in Az due to family matters) and I have never had anyone question it.  I just pay and go.

As for the computers  I would declare them when you stop for the visas..  You might get across without paying but why take the risk. It won't be much money. They will have time to look in your car while you are getting your visas.

If you were crossing without having to stop  for your visas.  You could just drive on across.  When I crossed the border during my first trip  there  I had a new computer.  I just drove across.   Later I got another and just drove across with it.   I only stopped to declare anything  when I had obviously a vehicle with a lot of stuff.   Vehicles are weighed as you enter and they will pull over for inspection those extraordinary weight even though it is not obvious that you have "stuff" in the vehicle.  Once  I was pulled over because I had two fifty pound sacks of dog food that I had purchased at the navy commissary for a rescue shelter in Playas.  I didn't have to pay, they just checked.  When I drove across with a 22 ft  truck  load of furniture from my house in Newport Beach I had to  declare everything  I paid $35 US in pesos.  Living room, bedroom, dining office furniture, double door fridge, washer dryer patio furniture,:Lamps. vacuum  et al.

Doing it by the book  if you obviously bringing a lot of stuff in, is always best. I wouldn't sweat the small stuff.  just cross.  If you do get pulled over, cooperate and pay what is asked.  You will love that part of Mexico and its nearness to the border.  Get a Sentri Pass to ease the 'wait; of crossing and DO GET MEXICAN INSURANCE!

Moderated by Priscilla 2 months ago
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White about when you arrive by plane. My wife & I are looking at moving permanently to PV area with a permanent resident VISA status, we are bringing only personal stuff  (computers, Kindle, Ipad, iphones, clothing, linens, some cooking ustensils) all within 4 suitcases. Do we have to gens the household goods list  (menaje de casa) approved by the mexican consulate. Thanks, GyC.

http://www.sat.gob.mx/informacion_fisca … s_2014.pdf

Here in English are the rules. It states 1 laptop computer per person without paying duty.

"• Clothing –including bridal
trousseau–, footwear.
• Cleaning and beauty items.
• Items for babies, such as
chair, portable crib, stroller,
walker, among others.
• Two photographic or
recording cameras;
photographic material.
• Three mobile phones
or other wireless
network devices.
• One Global Positioning
System equipment
(GPS).
• One laptop; a copying
machine or portable printer;
one burner and portable
projector.
• A portable DVD reproduction
device, a set of portable
speakers.
• A video game console,
ten DVD discs, thirty compact
discs; three packages of s
devices for any electronic
equipment.

• Five toys, including collection
items; books, magazine and
printed documents.
• A hand toolset with its
storage case, which may
include a drill, pliers,
sockets, screwdrivers,
power cables, among
o thers.
• A device to measure glucose
or a mixed device and their
reagents, as well as medicines
for personalize (you must
show the corresponding
medical prescription
in case of psychotropic
substances).

• Two complete personal
sports equipments, three fishing rods four
surf boards with or without
sail and their accessories.
• Trophies or awards.
• A camping tent and other
camping articles.
• A pair of binoculars and
telescope, two musical
instruments and their
accessories."

travellight :

So Let me make it easier. The first question is yes, we crossed many times with at least 2 computers , Kindles Cells, cables etc, and had no problem. They were all in standard carrying cases or backpacks. The only way you might have a problem would be if you were carrying equipment in boxes that make them look new. That's when they would question if you were bringing things for sale. If it looks like your personal equipment there should be no problem.

The visa is even easier , you get it when you cross. The Aduana decides how many days you can have, but they usually give you the standard 180 days. If you decide to travel into more interior areas you will have to get a refundable import fee for your car. So think about that. You can travel back and forth in only two states without an import tax. Stay in those states and you are good.

ADUANA is Mexican Customs. INM [Instituto National de Migración] is Mexican Immigration which are different agencies. INM gives foreigners the 180 day FMM tourist cards.

You said; "You can travel back and forth in only two states without an import tax. Stay in those states and you are good."

Where did this information come from? Import tax on what?

Hi and thanks Alleycat, my question was related to moving to Mexico under a Resident Visa. Since you are living in Mexico since 5 years, based on your profile, what did you do to bring in your personal items in Mexico in regards to the "household goods certificate" that doesn't include a car. Are you under a temporary (up to 4 years) or permanent resident visa.
My wife and I are looking forward to ask for a Permanent resident visa at our local consulat office but the cost for the "household goods certificate" is quite expensive over 100$usd and most be filed in spanish in 4 copies.
What was your own experience on this matter.
Thanks a lot GyC.

If you read the whole statement you will see I am referring to a car. It's best to read and understand what was written before looking for opportunities to fact check. It saves a lot of trouble  for all involved. And prevents confusing the people you are trying to help.

I know iNM is the official name for the agency in the border crossing at the frontera, but without clearing up the car import issue through the official Aduana agent.( usually in the same building ), if not the same office, you do not get permission to move on.
They work hand in hand you must deal with both of them.

http://www.bajainsider.com/article/mexi … xceptions. I have crossed the border since the new laws , but had no problems.

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