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Teaching English in Malta

Hi :) I'm looking into coming to Malta for sometime and i was wondering what course of certificates I need to tach English in Malta?

Thanks :)

Hi Stephanie,

check this link for requirements to work as an EFL teacher: https://eltcouncil.gov.mt/en/Pages/ELT-Teachers.aspx
or here: https://eltcouncil.gov.mt/en/Pages/Requ … ermit.aspx

I'm an EFL teacher in Malta myself, so if you have any specific questions, feel free to pm me.


Bernie

Thanks heaps Bernie.

Is it hard to find jobs teaching English ?

I've not been, but apparently there are quite a lot of schools - but they usually prefer Maltese and the pay isn't great. There seem to be lots of jobs on the phone, and with international companies though, if your English is good (someone can correct me if I'm wrong!)

It may be an idea for you to teach with an online school, even before you go, and you can make the move easier on yourself. If you really want to teach English, that is. Think you need a TESOL, or similar, to apply for a license to teach there.

StephanieDesira :

Thanks heaps Bernie.

Is it hard to find jobs teaching English ?

There are currently 46 English language schools in Malta (including Gozo), most of them in the Sliema/St. Julian's area. In the larger schools, there's work all year round - a friend of mine went to a school in St. Julian's in February just to ask if they had any jobs available, and he had a job from the next day. He might have been lucky, though.

Generally, if you have a CELTA it's quite easy to find work, whereas if you've only got the minimum qualifications (I'm referring to what the ELT Council and the schools accept as qualifications, that is a TEFL certificate - it doesn't necessarily make a big difference what other qualifications you have...) you might be hired for the busy season only (June, July, August).

Generally, in the EFL business in Malta it's hard to get a full-time contract; most schools just do temporary part-time contracts (in my experience, you get a 2-month contract, stating that the school will offer you work as long as they have students; after the two months they might keep you, but you haven't really got a contract...)

As for the pay, you usually get paid by the hour, for actual hours taught. Breaks are unpaid, as is preparation, etc. E.g. if you teach a class in the morning and a class in the afternoon, you'd be at school from 9-5, but you'd only be paid for 6 hours (9.00-10.30; 11.00-12.30; 1:30-3.00; 3.30-5.00). If there are no students, your class might bee cancelled without notice; so you won't be paid at all.

How much you get per hour depends on the school and on your qualifications; with a CELTA it's around 10 or 11 Euros/hour, without a CELTA its's less; I've heard of teachers teaching for as little as 5.50 Euros/hour(!)

Hope that helps - please note that all this info is based on my personal experience as an EFL teacher.

You don't get paid if the class is cancelled at the last minute? We usually get paid, unless the students cancels 24 hours ahead in Brazil! I don't think I'll do much school teaching in Malta, unless I'm really having problems.

The wages are about what I expected, but you can work online now from home and get paid far better (mostly teaching Asians). Even if you are in a top school, seems like with cancellations prolly hard to break 13-14k. Most people that do EFL don't get rich though, lol.

Dorieus :

You don't get paid if the class is cancelled at the last minute? We usually get paid, unless the students cancels 24 hours ahead in Brazil!

Of course I can't speak for all 46 schools, but at the school I teach at, and where my friends teach, and where my colleagues used to teach you don't get paid if the class is cancelled at the last minute. Happens more often than you'd expect, especially with 1:1 students.

Dorieus :

Even if you are in a top school, seems like with cancellations prolly hard to break 13-14k. Most people that do EFL don't get rich though, lol.

You won't get rich here for sure... I'm in a small school, so at the moment just teaching mornings (because there are no students in the afternoon) - which means I'm making less than 700/month. And a colleague of mine hasn't taught for the past 2 weeks because the school had no work for her.

I'm not complaining, and luckily I've got income from another job, too, but anyone who's planning a teaching career in Malta should be aware of those things, I think!

Yeah, I think that's good advice - especially as there seems to be a lot of work online atm.

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