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I am a proud flag waving pure Englishman

I am a proud flag waving pure Englishman ................ or maybe not.

I grew up in a rough area where there were only white people around, so the stories told by my peers about 'blackies' were accepted without question.
I took me until I was 17 to realise people from other backgrounds were ... eeer .... people just like me.

That all started after a night on the juice, being demi-dragged by a mate into my first Chinese take away, that place where they sold cat meat as chicken, or so the stories went.
Even in my less than sober state I could see the woman behind the counter was less than happy at the abuse she was getting from the customers, and I didn't like it at all.

I did like the sweet and sour chicken, so I took to visiting at least once a week. One quiet evening I asked her how to say 'thank you' in Chinese (Having to clue there were many Chinese languages and she spoke Cantonese).
Anyway, I gave my lousy pronunciation a blast when she brought out my food, seeing a notable smile on her face when I said it.
On later visits I also noted the portion size increased - being nice did me a good turn.

That set me on a course that rejected racism as stupidity, and allowed me to realise people are just people, regardless of their skin colour, race, religion, or whatever other box people get stuffed into.
I also did a little checking of my own family, realising a had a half West Indian whatever a cousin's daughter's son is. I also found out a little of my own line, getting a few shocks there as well.
Muslims, Christians and Jews all in one family - that'll upset a few extremists of all camps who prefer war to peace, but they can get stuffed.
As a bonus, I discovered amazing food from around the world, made a whole host of new mates, and was treated to a terrific number of cultural shows I would have missed if the bigoted words of the idiots from my younger days had stuck with me.
I suppose the climax would be my getting married to a non white, non British nagging wife, did I say, "Nagging"? Sorry, I meant beautiful.

Then this came to my attention.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyaEQEmt5ls

The question at the end is, "Would you like to take that journey?".
Oh, yer babe, I'd love to do that one.
I wonder where I can get a DNA test around here.

So, dudes and dudettes, do you know where you're from?

I know that I'm not (well, we all aren't) mixed enough, so I married a girl from the other end of the world and made some more mixed kids. Anyway, for some reason inter-racial people usually look better and are more interesting than one-sided ones.

The appearance of mixed Indonesian/white kids is big stuff out here, with TV soap operas full of 'indo' actors. Their talent (or total lack of it) doesn't seem to much matter as long as they look like they're mixed race.
A really weird form of inverse racism that never ceases to amuse me, especially when I look back at how mixed race kids are so often seen in the UK.
I think the second prettiest girl (My wife is number one - or she's hit me) was a 3 way between Indian (Singapore) man and a Chinese (Sing)/white dude mum.
She was amazingly beautiful, exceptionally clever, and had a temper no one wanted to be on the wrong side of.

We have been very lucky to find ourselves in a small community (50,000 people on the Island) that has almost zero racial intolerance. Plenty of ethnic intolerance, mind, but not racial or colour. Our son was aged two when we arrived, and he grew up rubbing shoulders with a great variety of colours and nationalities. Among our residents we have around 100 nationalities, and every major religion. The native Caymanians (about 20,000 of them) are mostly a mixture of African and European, with some Indian (from India). When slavery was abolished in this isolated island of a few thousand, there seems to have been a sexual free-for-all.

We don't have the North American hang-up, where everybody with a trace of African blood is called black. We take our colours literally. When I first got here, and was feeling my way, I asked a young woman in my firm would she consider herself black. No, no, not at all. How would she describe herself, then? "Hmm. Dark chocolate, I think." And I could see the difference. Of course we approximate, and equivocate: a black person with European features would usually be called "that Indian-looking fella": a pure-blood African would be described as "black-black".

Nor do we have any great hang-ups about racially loaded words, even the bad ones. Well, up to a point! Here's a blog-post of mine from a few years ago that illustrates the situation. The first half of the post features a famous Australian footballer of the 1920s, the second half tells of the only time I have ever used the infamous n-word in any other context. It was amusing, looking back.
http://barlowscayman.blogspot.com/2013/ … wn_21.html

^ I want to 'like' that post twice.

I loved the bit about colours and how they're taken as colours, not identities.

I really love to take that DNA test to know if I carry more nationalities in me than I know.
As a mix culture product of myself and I produced even more mixed  kids, I wonder how much it would be. But at the same time very curious how they search in our genes.

In Jordan there is a lot of (hidden) racism but on a other level It's more on the culture towards Palestinians and Syrians. Which is to me very strange as it was one country before the creating of Jordan about sixty years ago.

I think I might have found a place in Jakarta.
I'll investigate when I get a moment.

Fred :

I loved the bit about colours and how they're taken as colours, not identities.

It's confusing sometimes. I was at a pool party not long ago where a Black American (sic), a visitor to the Island, was present. A cheerful and personable chap, with no racial hangups, but at some point the topic of US racial problems came up, and he used the expression "we blacks" several times. The host and I let it pass, but we were dying to shout, "You're not black, mate, you're medium-brown, verging on light brown, and not much darker than brown-ish!" We knew he was speaking the US idiom, but all the same it seemed a bit forced, to us pedants.

Primadonna :

In Jordan there is a lot of (hidden) racism but on a other level It's more on the culture towards Palestinians and Syrians. Which is to me very strange as it was one country before the creating of Jordan about sixty years ago.

Yes, it would be more a cultural prejudice than a racial one. As for Jordan being "one country"... it was surely only ever an artificial country as late as 1967, when Israel invaded and occupied the Palestinian territories. Until 1919 or 1921 it was part of the Ottoman Empire's province of Syria, and according to Wikipedia there was a social and perhaps a cultural division between the north and the south of what is now Jordan. Then for a time Palestine was annexed. When my wife and I backpacked in the area in 1965, it was Jordan that we visited; there was no such political entity as Palestine any more. Jordan's present boundaries have prevailed since 60 or so years ago - you're right - but it wasn't really a single country before then.

Just got round to seeing that YouTube in #1.

Boy, you guys are really gullible if you think that set-up performance is genuine. Never seen such a bunch of horse hockey for a long while.  :)
Let's all go hug a tree and sing "Kumbaya, my Lord".  :D

You know that song too  :lol: ?

Well sort of !!
I was usually more concerned to see that my bangers (sausages) were grilled to perfection without burning.  :)

El_Jost :

Just got round to seeing that YouTube in #1.

Boy, you guys are really gullible if you think that set-up performance is genuine.

It's reality TV so rubbish by nature, but the point is still valid.

For me it was more than that. To me I had a strong impression that they were reciting leant script. You know it is possible to tell the same story more than one time, each time with a different setting; that is the impression I had. I wasn't impressed.

BTW Did you take up their offer and apply for the test?

El_Jost :

For me it was more than that. To me I had a strong impression that they were reciting leant script. You know it is possible to tell the same story more than one time, each time with a different setting; that is the impression I had. I wasn't impressed.

BTW Did you take up their offer and apply for the test?

Of course they were, it's just a soap opera presented a demiscience, but the point of the post holds regardless of their pathetic acting.

As for the test, my kid is moving school, I'm extremely tired and I've been busy with other stuff so I haven't had chance yet. A few more things to do then I'm going to contact them.

El_Jost :

BTW Did you take up their offer and apply for the test?

I would like to take the general-DNA test, and will do so one day. One of my English ancestors was married in India, and it's possible that the girl was Anglo-English. I hope so. All my family-history research has given me is English and Irish, and those lines came together in Australia just two generations ago. My wife's ancestry is English and Scottish only - as far as we know, of course. Embarrassingly boring, to have nothing exotic from recent centuries!

I once had high hopes of my son's Mexican girlfriend, but nothing came of that relationship; all he brought into the line, eventually, was some Norwegian, which isn't much help. However, he, his mother and I all tan easily, which I don't think is natural to "pure English". Not from what I've seen on the beaches of Bournemouth, anyway!

Gordon Barlow :

I would like to take the general-DNA test, and will do so one day.

I wouldn't do that without first checking up beforehand exactly what these DNA tests can conclusively bring in the way of results. What they state in the video sounds a bit dubious to me like telling individuals that they are part "Italian" etc. Italy is a name that was only given to a region in the middle of the 1800s holding many different peoples.

I personally know an Irish person who doesn't know who his father is because his mother refuses to tell him. She was a single mum, but he leant from other relatives that she was going out with an Italian. He has been researching the field of DNA testing and had some tests done. What I have learnt from him in his many emails is that DNA testing is very complicated, that the science is still young and that results require careful interpretation.

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