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Buy Joglo House Bali Java

Dear all,
I am planning to lease a land in Bali, and buy some Joglo houses to build on it.
So i am looking for serious contacts in Java/Bali who sell traditional Javanese house.
I am looking to have info about prices, style age, how to ship ... ?
Anyone know about it ?
Thank you
S.

Be careful, as the pitfalls associated with your desired project are many.

By private message I'm sending you the e-mail address of someone in the Ubud area who has quite a lot of experience with this exact sort of project.

Good luck.

Great thks

hi sophie,

Did you find already what you are looking for?  Probably I can help you with a central java style joglo, 10x10 mtr.

sophiefoucher :

So i am looking for serious contacts in Java/Bali who sell traditional Javanese house.

Don't know how I missed this one.
The best way is to wander the villages looking for manufacturers.
There are loads around, but hardly any advertise.
Within a few km of my place there are 4 or 5 that come to mind, but all work and deliver locally.
There are bound to be a bunch on Bali.
Hang on ... I'll google.

https://www.google.co.id/search?sourcei … 7.8444j0j7

Yep, loads advertise, so they'll be a pile more that don't - and are probably cheaper.

I'd like to make the same. Rent land for long term and llok for joglo/limasan to put on.
Appreciate any suggestion where to buy good joglo/limasan and tips about bad anf good to make it.
Thanks a lot

there's some shops by kerobokan street and canggu to make joglos and some shops around by pass towards sanur

Thanks Vina. I know the one in kerobokan. Quite pricy.
I'll try to look around

Hi, I'm interested in buying 6 joglos for building in Ubud. Could you please msg me mentioned contact? Thank you.

OK Helmut, done, and good luck with your project.

Hi Ubudian,

I'd really appreciate it if you could forward the same contact for the joglo builds please.  We are in Sanur and have clients who ask about this sort of thing once in a while.

Thanks very much,

Tom

OK Tom...I sent you a PM.

Cheers, Roy

hi there, did you manage to get good contacts for joglo building ? what are you experience? would appreciate any advice.

what are the pitfalls ? i would like to know more about it. if you can pm me - i would love some help with that. Im looking at 3are land near Brawa for 20 years lease. I wanted to see if i can afford to pull out the whole thing before buying the land.

Your profile says you are in Russia planning to move to New Zealand.

Foreigners CAN NOT BUY or own land or properties!!

thanks for coming into my profile and posting irrelevant comment. i travel all over the world and i spend in Bali a few months per year. I am from Russia and also live in NZ. The web site is limited to "where are you from and where you want to move".
Hence to your comment about ownership-. foreigners can lease land long term up to around 50 years if do a few agreements. Also if you have a company you can buy on the company name. Do your research.

it is you who said "i wanted to see if i can afford to pull out the whole thing before buying the land".

As a foreigner you may can lease using a nominee but this is still illegal.

if you have in Indonesia a PMA set up then you respectively company may can buy land.

I think Valeriya already mentioned leasing the land for 20 years, and when she said "buying the land" I think her emphasis was on seeing the cost of financing everything before obtaining the land. She should not have said "buying" but actually I understood what she meant since she explained about leasing for 20 years.

We really do not need to speak so strongly here as Valeriya's meaning was very clear. Please no offence to anyone.

Thanks :)  :one  I have heard not so good stories about building in Bali. (Have lived in house that my friend has just finished and it was a nightmare of everything keeps breaking).  If anyone can point me in the right direction re joglos- i would appreciate that.

One potential pitfall to a joglo project in Bali has just come to my attention through my brother in law who sits on the Bali Provincial DPRD (provincial legislative body). 

Apparently there is a concerted effort afoot in several regencies of Bali to put a moratorium on issuing building licenses for such structures as “they do not embody traditional Balinese architectural design.”  True enough, they don’t, and moreover some Javanese conservationists argue that as more and more are dismantled and moved to Bali for reconstruction, the Javanese architectural heritage is being negatively impacted.

Personally I think both the Balinese and Javanese points of view are valid and deserving of consideration.

“I have heard not so good stories about building in Bali.”

As the old saying goes, “you get what you pay for.” 

With little or no exception, the Balinese will build most anything one asks to be built, and in whatever material they are told to build with.  The end result is not uncommon, the result of use of improper materials (because they’re generally cheaper, or not suitable), improper installation (cheaper and more unskilled labor used), and lack of oversight during the construction process.

The fact that the Balinese are in fact highly skilled and exceptional builders can be easily proven by visiting most any of the top 5 star resorts on Bali and carefully looking at the results.  And of course there are numerous and now old private home projects here on Bali which were built by the top builders of their time, and with no “cutting corners.”  Several of those can be viewed in the book Bali Style by Rio Helmi and Barbara Walker.

It never ceases to amaze me how many folks come to Bali with the burning desire to build a place of their own, but are so quick to discount the fact that the Balinese have been building on Bali for many centuries.  It also never ceases to amaze me how very few folks will ever take any personal responsibility for the disastrous results, which are a certainty, when they proceed, determined to do it their way.  ;)

We used Renon Property as our architects. The have a good portfolio and are expert at designing modern Balinese villa style houses.

Selecting a good architect is highly important.  For our projects we use my brother in law, a graduate of ITB in Bandung and father of what is loosely called these days, “the Bali International Style” which he made famous with his projects for Amandari Resorts.

Equally, if not more important however is the selection of Tukang, or the main contractor in charge of the project, as well as on site daily supervision of the workers.  As to be expected, the best Tukangs are in very high demand and often might be involved in several projects at one time…which is not always good as I prefer a Tukang who is willing to devote 100% of his time to our project.  I hate having to tear something down after a full day or two of work not under the direct supervision of the Tukang because he was busy elsewhere.  This happens more often than I care to admit, and of course it only adds additional costs to the project. 

In general, and this is more a reflection of economic reality as opposed to any sort of disparagement, basic labor (clearing the land, mixing and laying concrete, hauling stones, etc,) is by way of temporarily imported workers from eastern Java.  The actual construction, especially finish work (laying granite floors, carving, wood working, tiling, plumbing and electric, swimming pool installation, etc.) is generally left to highly skilled Balinese craftsmen who are paid about twice (or more) than Javanese labor.  As I said, that is just the economic reality and most every Balinese project (no foreigners involved) operate this way. 

A well managed and skilled building project on Bali is quite something to behold, and not at all like something that someone from outside this culture will be accustomed.  The use of bamboo scaffolding and bucket brigades of freshly mixed concrete up to the second and third floors are just two sights that leave a memorable impression on one’s mind.

For me personally, every project is a double edged sword.  I hate the process itself and all the stress, anxiety and uncertainty associated with it, but I always end up loving the final result, even with cost overruns, which are par for the course.

It is very true about finding a good tukang. If you are not using a general contractor then you need to find a good tukang who has a good team of workers. By directly using a good tukang you can save on the overall cost as contractors tend to mark up the price quite a bit. Also, with a tukang you might be able to pay a daily rate or pay based on each little project within the overall project. We found the latter to be more cost effective and we use the same tukang for all our projects as we know his quality is good.

The tukang is very important. If you choose a bad one then you may find days when nobody turns up for work or that instead of the 10 or 15 workers you expected, only 3 or 4 turn up.

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please find the web below
https://translate.google.co.id/translat … rev=search

Hi Helmut.. have you got the joglos?
you just visit HOUSING Section here... Cheers

Zanzio...try sending him a message if your desire is to contact him directly.

Ubudian... yes I will ... thank you

Hi Helmut, have you got the joglos ?
could you please to see my advertising in HOUSING Section. nice to see you..

Hey there how are you?! I came across your post from about 9 months ago asking about Joglo's in Bali and wanted to see how you have progressed with your project? I am wanting to do a similar idea leasing land and putting some accommodation up. I have already been living in Bali for 2 years.

Can I ask did you;
- find a/some Joglo's?
- did you go to Java?
- how much/size were your Joglo's?
- do you have any useful contacts?

Thanks so much

Hi there,

just a brief update since some are interested in the progress. Due to personal issues my partner and I  didn't continue creating the accommodation business after getting the land. I made some good contacts though and came to the conclusion to best use a local builder who buys joglos in java. If anyone is interested in 22are stunning ricefield location our lease is up for sale now.

Probably there is much more behind ?

Why you decided that way ?

Happy!  Good to see you back, but why did you ask this question?:

“Why you decided that way?”

Helmut had written:

“I made some good contacts though and came to the conclusion to best use a local builder who buys joglos in java.”

Helmut is absolutely correct.  Any building project in Bali should be undertaken by using a local (Balinese) builder.  And, as joglos are indigenous to Java, and not Bali, the cost for them is always better in Java.

Hey!

Not too sure if you got my first reply? Thanks for the pointer, I think that could be a wise idea to use a local builder. I'm interested to know where your land is??

I am still looking for land to lease. My budget is about AU$25,000 for a 10 year lease with intent to extend. I am looking around Canggu region.. Where is your land?

Hi there,

just a brief update since some are interested in the progress. Due to personal issues my partner and I  didn't continue creating the accommodation business after getting the land. I made some good contacts though and came to the conclusion to best use a local builder who buys joglos in java. If anyone is interested in 22are stunning ricefield location our lease is up for sale now.

Hey Ubudian, thanks for the insight, very helpful. could you Pm me the details of your builder. And also were would you recommend looking for second hand joglos to buy for the purpose of recycling for building materials? we are hoping to reduce building costs by recycling parts from old joglos.

hi where abouts is the land located? and do you have photos?

“…we are hoping to reduce building costs by recycling parts from old joglos.”

For that you want to get in touch with Naga Mas in the village of Mas outside of Ubud.   They’ve been doing this for over 20 years. 

Our building projects are always self contracted…which is an advantage when married into a Balinese family of various building trades.

However, with that said, the next time you’re in Bali stop by The Fly Café just outside of Ubud as this is a popular hangout for a number of Australians who have lived here for years and have used any number of local contractors.  Same goes for the chef and owner of the Fly, Markus.

Great info thank you

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