Close

Moving to Calabria Do's and Don'ts

My husband and I are planning on moving to Italy within the next couple of years. We have an 8 year old son. We are trying to find out the do's and don'ts of living in Calabria. We would also like to find out about schooling. If the schooling is not that great, then we will have to wait 10 years to move there (which we definitely don't want to do.)

Any information, hints, tips are greatly appreciated.

Living in Calabria, like all south Italy district can be more difficult: it's one of the most poor district and the mafia are very present. I don't know nothing about the school sistem but I know that: statistically there are a lot of children that prefere to quit the school and go to work, even if they got 14/15/16 yo.
In Italy it's better live from the center to the north: from lazio and toscana to emilia romagna, marche, umbria, lombardia, piemonte, liguria, etc. I live in Bologna and it's one of the best place to live in Italy.
I hope that my answer can help you.

Thank you. I appreciate the information. We would like to be south, because of the warm weather and the beautiful beaches. Is there somewhere else in the south that you would recommend?

I'm an American who has lived in Calabria since 2003. I don't have children, but I will note that many successful Italians come from the south, so obviously the school system is doing something right--unfortunately these driven students often have to go north or elsewhere in Europe to find work, which is perhaps the biggest problem the south faces. In fact, the "students of the South" were recently named the best in Italy:

http://www.studenti.it/superiori/maturi … o_lode.php

Please feel free to email me private at michellefabio5(at)gmail(dot) com with any questions, etc., about life in Calabria.

Any places in Calabria specifically that would be good? I would like to narrow it down, but definitely want a place that is near the beach and pretty inexpensive. We are moving there for early retirement :)

Hi BJ Gordon

I just move from london with my family to Calabria 1

We are really enjoy it and, especially on the ionian coast properties are soo cheap, you can buy a nice see vioew flat from 60,000 euros.

If you'd like to coantact me for further info pls email :

dio62 at hotmail.com

ciao Peter

michellefabio :

I'm an American who has lived in Calabria since 2003. I don't have children, but I will note that many successful Italians come from the south, so obviously the school system is doing something right--unfortunately these driven students often have to go north or elsewhere in Europe to find work, which is perhaps the biggest problem the south faces. In fact, the "students of the South" were recently named the best in Italy:

http://www.studenti.it/superiori/maturi … o_lode.php

Please feel free to email me private at michellefabio5(at)gmail(dot) com with any questions, etc., about life in Calabria.

sorry but this is a non sense statistic like saying most of the guys from the north are idiots.

i might say in contrary that they just get better marks as the schooling system is more..."easy". but i will nto say that.

it is known that the school sytsem in the south is not the best one, university as well that is why most of the students go north for their studies.

if you have an 8 year odl son, i wouldnt move to calabria, this region cant offer that much for his future.
mafia is really present.
i am sure it is a ncie place for holidays but i would move there with an 8 yera old kid. but this is my idea.

what about moving on the lakes? weather is pleasant as well and quality of life is one of the best and i suppose english is more spoken as in calabria

marco

The north has very beautiful cities and towns. But if you want to experience The Italian Vita Bella and the heart of Italy and Italians Go south young man go south !  The north is polluted with insane politics and unions, ( worse than the USA)  and certainly is far more influenced by European countries and cultures outside of Italy. Not that this hasn't touched the south. It just hasn't made as large a foot print on the south. That has been changing and unfortunately will continue to do so. But thank god the south is Behind the culture shift experienced in the north.

If you are young and ambitious and looking for a fast pace go to the USA.
But if you want to enjoy life, food or if you are a writer or painter go south !

Tante Belle Cose

Harry
PS: northern Italians will not like my assessment. The friction between north and south is an ancient one. It will not end anytime soon. A presto !!

Hi Harry,

Welcome to Expat.com and thank you for the sharing.

However, please note that you posted on a very old thread (2009)

It would be much appreciated if you could start a new discussion and share any experience or information for better interaction.

Thank you,

Hasnaa

Well, also this story of the easier grading system in the South is an old clichè... I studied in Calabria and I had an amazing career so far in Milan, Dublin and London, so I really don't know what you are talking about.

Moreover, please be helpful and don't say things that are not completely true such as "mafia is very present, etc". In fact, like all the places on earth, there are rough areas, but those are pretty small compared to the rest. (Happy to be proven wrong since I was born and bred there, while probably you've never put your feet in Calabria)

I'm planning myself to continue to earn money abroad to go back to Calabria and start a business. I believe there are few places on earth like it: gorgeous mountains (Sila, Pollino), wonderful beaches, volcanos near by and warm people everywhere.

I don't know Calabria too well although I do hear that the Beaches are beautiful. The mafia is in Sicily and its just another name for organised crime, which can be found anywhere in the world, including London! so don't let that put you off. I would recommend Puglia, which just as south as Calabria and just as lovely, true its flatter but the coastline is one of the cleanest and best in Italy. My nephew aged 8 goes to the local school, and he seems to be doing very well.
Tony

I have distant relatives in Marina di Gioiosa Ionica, and my father was born there, but my Italian is awful these days.  I was born in the USA and am now interested in having a home in Italy.  I am thinking anywhere along the West coast from Lazio down to Calabria.  I would only be in Italy for a couple of weeks per year as I have young kids in school in the USA, so I would want a location that could yield sufficient rent when I am not there.  Are there any recommendations on a great beach town?  Something close to an airport or train station would also be preferred.   I love my dad's home town, but there was not much to do in terms of renting wave runners, renting boats, etc.  Is there a good site that you would recommend to look at homes for sale?

New topic

Expatriate health insurance in Italy

Free advice and quotation service to choose an expat health insurance in Italy

Moving to Italy

Find tips from professionals about moving to Italy

Travel insurance in Italy

Enjoy stress-free travel to Italy