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Black Americans

Visited Loja last 2 weeks met a couple & single man Black Americans.  Suggest you correspond with.  **** Very helpful just acquired residency

Moderated by Christine last year
Reason : Please do not post email address on the forum for security reason

Hi, Lee -- If you were responding directly to me & my profile info, I'm sorry to say that it is horribly out of date!!  I have already moved to Ecuador -- more than a year ago.  I. Love. It!!!  I moved to Puerto Lopez, on the coast.  I get to hear the ocean all night long and wake up and walk out on my balcony and look at it. Every day.  (sorry if that sounds a little like gloating, but what can I say?)  I retired January, 2013 and boarded a plane in October, 2013 Ecuador bound. I know a great number of people have their hearts set on Cuenca and I don't mean to imply it's not a good choice.  I will say that if you and your husband are at all acquainted with any of the "itis"family (Arthur, burse and the rest) Cuenca might not be a good choice.  It is a beautiful city, beautiful setting, but it rains a lot and I know people who moved away from there because of their arthritis etc..  It also has fairly high altitude - not bad, but be in shape and used to walking when you come in November, otherwise you'll spend a couple of days getting used to the air. No bugs, but can get and usually is chilly -- evenings are definitely sweater weather, and when shopping for place to live, look for place with fireplace, as you might need it.  (there are no furnaces, but fireplace can knock the chill off a room). Quito is similar, but much higher altitude.  I don't mean to be judgmental, but in my humble opinion, the expat community in Cuenca has grown extremely large extremely quickly, and in some ways it seems to me that some of the people may be flexing just a bit to be top dog.  They also seem to want to recreate what they left.  A lot of them also seem to think the local government is supposed to be there & do for them, as opposed to them just trying to fit into this land they've chosen to come to and who has their own way of doing things and have done it that way for some time now, successfully, without input and/or correction from others.  End of Rant.  Sorry.
     If you are super serious about giving up the rat race and just kicking back & you had been considering Cuenca, I would highly recommend Loja.  Very similar to Cuenca but not as many people (yet), not as chilly, not as much rain,  little more difficult to get to, has university, symphony, lots of concerts, many people play instruments of some sort, generally a very low key place. Very lovely. There's even a gate to the city!!  Remaining from 1500's.  Probably won't find too much on internet insofar as places to live and stuff like that, because  they aren't used to being connected that way.  You just have to go and look and ask.  Knock-your-socks-off kind of beauty & tranquility. You owe it to yourself to go look.
     Good luck in your quest!!   Please stay I touch.

The email address you gave for person in Loja is incorrect.  Would you please check it again & post corrected address?  Thanks!

Moderated by Christine last year
Reason : Please do not post email address on the forum for security reason

Thank you!

Moderated by Christine last year
Reason : Please do not post email address on the forum for security reason [asked by the person of this email address]

Thanks you!  I have already sent the email, but I will look at the website.  How did you like Loja?

Loja was exciting, interesting , people exceptionally nice.  I do no speak much Spanish but was able to communicate, smiles say a lot. We walked all over town, nice Supermaxi grocery.  Sun am several streets closed for farmers market, vegs, fruit & seafood.  Really great.  Was told of a 3 bed New fully furnished apt. 500 month.  Lunch 3 course. 3.00. Can't beat the prices,  I am considering going back for 6 months in Dec & try & teach English.

Hi S,
Thank you so very much for responding!!! Sounds like you're living the life of Riley!!!!😄😄 my husband s d I are planning a trip in Nov of this year, we are in the process of learning spanish, the course I found on line is really terrific and the course is so much fun which you know always makes learning fun.  I have also looked at Loja just in case I don't like Cueneca.  I know there are a lot of other towns but I must be careful because neither my husband or myself want to live in hot humid weather. Also looked at a map of areas that could be malaria problems.

I like to have manicures and pedicures are there many places that provide those kinds of services?? I have been looking on line for homes that may be available to rent and while I have found some houses I notice that the majority of them have miles of steps!!!!! If we choose Cuenca I think we may want to rent one with a fireplace....how are you finding the attitude of the people where you live?? Are they friendly, warm, excepting????? I am very excited about our upcoming trip, what do you think about the site ecuadorcentral.com and gringo Good Samaritan.com these sites help soon to be expats find apt/ homes for rent they also assist with getting you an attorney to assist you with resident visas. Have you tried using any of these sites? I know it is going to require a lot of work to end up in Eucador but I think we're up for it.  Continue to be safe,

Is there anything like the NAACP in Ecuador?  I have read various reports, some saying blacks were discriminated against, others saying they were treated well by everyone.  Would there be any advantage to being black, such as in some very black coastal area?  I ask this in wake of the news story out of Spokane, Washington, and the new term I learned, incognegro.

Aloxi :

what do you think about the site ecuadorcentral.com and gringo Good Samaritan.com ... these sites help soon to be expats find apt/ homes for rent they also assist with getting you an attorney to assist you with resident visas. Have you tried using any of these sites?

Good for you and your husband, Aloxi, learning more Spanish before coming to Ecuador. :top:  What is the website of the excellent online course you are using?

The commercial website Ecuador Central is one I had never heard of.

They sell real estate and also visa assistance.  I saw nothing on that site that persuades me that they would objectively lead you to a reliable attorney any better than the posters on the Ecuador forum.

cccmedia in Quito

The other site you asked about, gringogoodsamaritans.com (note spelling correction), is a new site (May 2015 according to an Internet listing) for a mom 'n pop Cuenca operation, run by Frank and Angie, with their son Brandon.

This could be highly personalized service, although their track record may not  yet be of long duration.

cccmedia in Quito

Hello all,
Having spent 22 years on active duty and done a significant amount of travel abroad, it is clear to me that racism can be found anywhere. I have and have had friends of many colors and from all levels of the economic scale.

In my opinion if you conduct yourself in a well mannered fashion, and show respect for others you will receive the same in kind, most of the time. Now I am not rich, nor have I ever been, but I am sure everyone has been gouged for something at one time or another, even in the good ole USA. If a person walks around with a chip on their shoulder, it can be seen, your body language and pattern of speech reflects your mental state.

I personally treat the janitor the same way I treat the owner, trying to follow the rule of "Treat others as you wish to be treated". Does it always pay off, no but I have fewer encounters than others. I honestly have had more profiling in my own country than around the globe, and I am clearly Caucasian with light brown hair and blue eyes. One trip back into the US I was detained because I was "clocking the security" as they called it. While standing in line I apparently took too much interest in the surveillance systems etc. I drew suspicion even as a US service member on travel orders. When I explained that Physical Security was a large part of my job, all I got was "The look". I explained that as I was on travel orders if I was to be detained any longer I would need to contact my Command. That is just one of several encounters, I was stopped several times at a checkpoint in California traveling from San Diego to Temecula where I was living. I was asked repeatedly if I had a "Green Card", on all the stops I was riding my custom Harley Davidson with black leathers and a red bandana. I presented my green active duty military ID card, and asked why I was stopped? I was told that I resembled a member of an outlaw Mexican biker gang.

Unfortunately ignorance can be found anywhere on this planet, in the end you have only one of two choices; you can lock your doors and hide from the big bad world or you can learn about your environment and assimilate into it. The standard rules do always apply;

1. Be aware of your surroundings
2. Don't stick out (Being that rich, loud American)
3.  Always have an E&E (Escape and Evasion) plan, a pre-planned response to trouble of any kind. What you will do, and where you will go. Just like a Boy Scout "Be Prepared".

In short, from my experiences I have found that if I maintain a low profile (blend) act like a well mannered professional, and treat others with respect, the going is much easier.     

WOW, shut up already!!! Sorry about that.

Good Luck All

GMC(SW) :

One trip back into the US I was detained because I was "clocking the security" as they called it. While standing in line I apparently took too much interest in the surveillance systems....I was stopped several times at a checkpoint in California traveling from San Diego to Temecula where I was living. I was asked repeatedly if I had a "Green Card", on all the stops I was riding my custom Harley Davidson with black leathers and a red bandana. I presented my green active duty military ID card, and asked why I was stopped? I was told that I resembled a member of an outlaw Mexican biker gang.

Ain't it great to be in Quito, where in my years here this sort of porquería doesn't ever happen to me any more.

In my last years in multiple U.S. states, I was pulled over and/or questioned by police as being "suspicious" and, when I was lost late at night in Jefferson County, Colorado, they wanted to search my car instead of assist me with road directions.  (To their consternation, I repeatedly refused their request for the search.)

Thanks, GMC, for teaching us yet another piece of military-speak in your post:
Clocking the security.

cccmedia in Quito

GMC(SW) :

Always have an E&E (Escape and Evasion) plan, a pre-planned response to trouble of any kind. What you will do, and where you will go. Just like a Boy Scout "Be Prepared".

Would love to hear an example of how you used this strategy in a real-life situation.

I was in the Boy Scouts in Montrose, New York, but cannot remember any training in escape and evasion.

cccmedia in Quito

cccmedia :
GMC(SW) :

One trip back into the US I was detained because I was "clocking the security" as they called it. While standing in line I apparently took too much interest in the surveillance systems....I was stopped several times at a checkpoint in California traveling from San Diego to Temecula where I was living. I was asked repeatedly if I had a "Green Card", on all the stops I was riding my custom Harley Davidson with black leathers and a red bandana. I presented my green active duty military ID card, and asked why I was stopped? I was told that I resembled a member of an outlaw Mexican biker gang.

Ain't it great to be in Quito, where in my years here this sort of porquería doesn't ever happen to me any more.

In my last years in multiple U.S. states, I was pulled over and/or questioned by police as being "suspicious" and, when I was lost late at night in Jefferson County, Colorado, they wanted to search my car instead of assist me with road directions.  (To their consternation, I repeatedly refused their request for the search.)

Thanks, GMC, for teaching us yet another piece of military-speak in your post:
Clocking the security.

cccmedia in Quito

Then obviously you haven't been reading the papers which report police check points where eveything is searched for possible weapons, drugs or other contraband.  It happens but we as foreigners are frequently untouched as we seldom engage in illegal activities, but then agin neither do the majority of the population.  Not that long ago the papers here in Cenca reported the police stopping and searching men near the market for any objects (pocket knives etc) that could be used in an aggressive manner.  I have been stopped here in Cuenca at road blocks and asked for papers for my scooter.  Locals were frequently searched and there is no right of refusal...

quito0819 :

I have been stopped here in Cuenca at road blocks and asked for papers for my scooter.  Locals were frequently searched and there is no right of refusal...

Roadblocks exist in Cuenca and other places, possibly for good reasons.  My point was that the police in Quito have never singled me out as supposedly suspicious.  They have been courteous and helpful in any encounter.

I had no intention to generalize for other places in Ecuador.

cccmedia in Quito

quito0819 :

there is no right of refusal...

This is the main difference.

Ask and Ye Shall Receive,
cccmedia requested that I give example of proper planning when it comes to Escape and Evasion (E&E).

Military life taught me many, many things. One phrase that especially comes to mind is the rule of 3 P's. Proper Prior Planning, Prevents Piss Poor Performance. Ok, sounds good, so how do you apply this to normal life.

I hate to sound like a type "A" personality, but it is what it is.
Here are some learned habits that follow the 3 P rule;

1. I always count the number of steps from the main door of an aircraft, then as I pass an emergency exit I do a split count, i.e. (54-1, 55-2 etc.) that way I know that even in the dark I can find an exit. I also look at the people in the emergency seats, do they look alert, confident and capable of opening the door under duress, or will they become a mass of frantic flesh that will require moving first? FYI my normal stride in the isle of an aircraft toting luggage is approx. 2', in a low crawl that equates to 2 crawling movements per stride taken.   

2. When I enter a restaurant I have never been to, I always go to the restroom after being seated. Not because I have a bladder the size of a peanut, but because it offers me the opportunity find alternate exits, and I especially look for where and what type of fixed or portable fire equipment is available. Chances are the staff does not know how to use it, but I do.

3. When driving I always stop 1 1/2 car lengths behind the car in front of me, and slowly inch forward to create space to my rear. I do this for two reasons; It offers me room to get around the car in front, and provides space between myself and the car behind me in the event they are hit. When driving a manual transmission or motorcycle I stay in first gear, I scan my mirrors to ensure the cars coming up behind are actually stopping, and not distracted by the phone, stereo, food, make up etc. 

As for the real life usage of E&E, once upon a time somewhere in the Middle East, Myself and five others were tasked to set up an OP (Observation Post) to observe a well traveled trail below. Prior to any OP (Operation) there is a great deal of the 3 P rule in use, gathering as much intelligence on the area as possible to make as many alternate plans as possible. So we decide on our Ingress route (Route In), our primary and secondary Egress Route (Getting Out). Now as much as I hate to admit it, Military Intelligence is not perfect. At times you could call it an Oxy-Moron.... We arrive at our OP in the very wee and cold hour of the morning, you could call it Zero Dark Thirty. We get set up and begin the long and arduous wait and watch game. Midway through the second day we had observed a good deal of traffic. Out of nowhere came the unmistakable Zing, and Snap of incoming fire. This was not good, but something we had of course made plans for. The thing we did not plan for was the OP that had been set up directly across the canyon, and above us by the bad guys. They were under an overhang, thus could not be seen from the air or satellite. So we packed up our gear Most Riki TIck (FAST) and down the hill the "Escape part". That's when it got ugly, Morter fire began to drop on our position, effectively cutting us of from not only our Primary but also the Secondary Egress route. Not knowing who or how many were not tracking us we began the "Evasion Part". Coming up to our OP the previous day we noticed that part way down the hill there was a small "Ditch" if you will that ran perpendicular to our trail and down along the wall of the cliff. It was strewn with loose rocks and overgrown with brush. Which is a good thing as it provides both Cover and Concealment. The bad thing is it is very hard to travel with gear, but you would be surprised just how motivated you can become when 40MM high explosives are dropping all around you. We dashed through the ditch for the full 200 yards of it and dropped into a pile when it ran out. Finally out of range and out of sight we could asses all the cuts and abrasions we collected on the way.

So the lesson is, had we not been paying attention we might have missed that ditch, and been forced down our primary or secondary route. This would have been very bad as we would have been exposed and with little cover or concealment, which is a bad thing. 

You never know when or where trouble can come from, and it is not only impossible but impractical to try to cover all the what "If's". Situational awareness can be very affective, and quit easy to do. Keep your head up, look around, watch what people are doing. Practice basic security measures, don't stand in a crowd, don't loiter in high traffic routes, always put space between yourself and anything you feel presents a potential hazard. It may sound silly, but you can train yourself to recognize and evaluate a threat instead of reacting in panic. All it takes is conscious awareness. It really does work, I can now even see it happening with my 15 year old, I can see his mind at work when we are in public.

I hope that is a decent example, I could of course go on and on. Sailors love to tell stories, especially when we are the main subject ;) ..

quito0819  While I understand your point, I must disagree with your logic.

Immigration and agricultural stops in the US in my experience are quite different from the check points here.
I would definitely agree that in the US the stops are mostly a form of harassment, unfortunately law enforcement has the attitude that you the citizen is "Guilty until Proven Innocent". They having received many hours of training in profiling and other forms of mental harassment, and operate under the assumption that "Everyone is guilty of something" and if they question a person enough they will get the answer they want.

Here in EC, I have never felt that way. As you may or may not know, EC also like many countries has an immigration problem and shares a border with one of the largest drug producing countries in the world. All of the stops I have been involved in where for the purpose of establishing my citizenship (Right to be here), and a quick check for illegal items (Drugs, weapons etc.) with this I have no problem. Is it not in our best interest for them to ensure our safety?
I have yet to be treated with disrespect or treated like a criminal. Yes, I have the proper papers for my car, if anyone wants to see them that is fine with me.

I have walked the streets of Quito many times at various times of the day, I have never been approached for looking suspicious, or as a person of interest. Why? perhaps it is because I don't stand out.. As they say, "When in Rome, act like a Roman.

No we have no right in THIS country to refuse a search, it's their country and their law!! If that bothers you perhaps another country would suit you better?! Perhaps Afghanistan, I do not remember and silly compulsory searches while there.....

Don't get me wrong, I am not trying to be argumentative or combative. I'm a lover not a fighter :)... I guess it just annoys me that it annoys you so much to allow a simple check, that actually serves a purpose !?.

But that is just my .2 cents

GMC(SW) :

in the US the stops are mostly a form of harassment, unfortunately law enforcement has the attitude that you the citizen is "Guilty until Proven Innocent". They having received many hours of training in profiling and other forms of mental harassment...operate under the assumption that "Everyone is guilty of something" and if they question a person enough they will get the answer they want.

Is it not also true, GMC, that in the U.S. such attitudes are officially promoted by some police departments' policy to give rewards or special benefits to cops who arrest alleged perps?

cccmedia

Yes Sir,
I didn't want to come right out and say it, but that is exactly correct.. Unfortunately a police state seems to be rapidly approaching. Granted there are some good people out there still working in law enforcement, but many of them feel like whipped dogs. I say that because I have five friends from three different LEO's, sorry Law Enforcement Organizations who have quit over the past six years, due to the new policies being pushed upon them.

It's ironic, I think it was in the first Transformer movie where I saw on a Decepticon police car that said "To Punish and Enslave", rather than serve and protect....  It's just not as funny now.

Oh my! I am so excited to hear of another Bahamian living in Ecuador. I would love to hear your story. My family and I are looking forward to our early 2016 move. I would love to hear from you. To hear your story from your cultural back ground. Please feel free to publicly post or send me a private email. I would live to hear from you.

Email me my name is Shirley 52,..from VA like to move do something different ...++++ like to talk to you. Thanks

Moderated by Maximilien last year
Reason : use the private message pls

Greetings to you Tameee from Jamaica. I am a Jamaican woman in my mid 50's single and I had been planning for the past two years to relocate to Ecuador but, always getting cold feet to make the first move. Bear in mind that I would visit first for a couple of months and then decide but, after reading your post and hearing that you are black along with your daughter living in Quito and having no raciest problem that really give me the jump start that am looking for. You might want to know ' why am I leaving Jamaica where there is a lot of sunshine and beautiful beaches ? well Jamaica is getting way too expensive for me, and bye me living in Germany back in the 80's for a number of years there are still some life style I would still like to enjoy-such eating out as much as possible with out have to be paying a arm and a leg. Now I don't know anyone in Ecuador, could we exchange emails address? or if anyone who are willing to communicate before I arrive this is my email ************** Cheers.

Moderated by Priscilla last year
Reason : Do not post your personal contact details on a public forum for your own security

My husband and I are looking for a place to retire in South America. We are not quite at retirement but as we approach we would love to have some top choices of where we would like to live.

Ecuador is an excellent option, you can see our summary review of the country and its people in our post - About Ecuadorians and the country of the mega diversity -
good luck

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