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Has anyone gone through the simplified naturalization precedure?

I understand that knowledge of the Hungarian language is a requirement, but how well must I know Hungarian?

I can speak it just under an intermediate level.

Welcome to Expat.com Regwo!

A little intro maybe?;)

Hope that you'll soon be enlightened.

Harmonie.

no?

Regwo :

no?

I looked at it once, saw the Hungarian language requirement, realised Hungary would join the EU in a few years, then thought, if one is an EU citizen anyway, what's would be the point of it?

There are a few minorities in Hungary, sizeable German minority and Romanians as well for example. If it was possible to satisfy the requirement by knowing say German, might be worth considering it once again.

I think this was intended for "Hungarians outside the borders", the Hungarian minorities in neighboring countries.

I think they will conduct a test for language proficiency. You just need to  pass.
I may be wrong just check with the authorities.

szocske :

I think this was intended for "Hungarians outside the borders", the Hungarian minorities in neighboring countries.

I looked at the Ministry web site and the requirements are quite weak except for the dreaded language test.

There's a short cut if one is married to a Hungarian, resident etc - only 3 years if I remember correctly.

bump

Well, you need an ancestor who have been  a citizen of Hungary, you need to prove it via birth certificates, and a lot of bureaucracy ,there is no language test , at least I didn't got one  , that is enough if you manage the whole process via your Hungarian skills :D they test it during the bureaucratic process. :)

panzer25 :

Well, you need an ancestor who have been  a citizen of Hungary, you need to prove it via birth certificates, and a lot of bureaucracy ,there is no language test , at least I didn't got one  , that is enough if you manage the whole process via your Hungarian skills :D they test it during the bureaucratic process. :)

What sort of questions do they ask? What happens if you don't understand something? Did you apply from inside Hungary or outside? How long does the process take?

bump

panzer25 :

Well, you need an ancestor who have been  a citizen of Hungary, you need to prove it via birth certificates, and a lot of bureaucracy ,there is no language test , at least I didn't got one  , that is enough if you manage the whole process via your Hungarian skills :D they test it during the bureaucratic process. :)

AFAIK, this is a different avenue. If you are of hungarian ancestry, and you have the necessary papers the case may be relatively, i.e. no language test  - I am guessing so, as I had a brazilian friend who considered this, perhaps finished the process by now.
The process for the Hungarians in the surrounding countries was made easyer recently - there was a stupid test on cultuture/history.

As for 'normal' immigrants.. As you can guess, this country does not yet have to fight the rivers of would-be immigrants.
Still we have some chinese and a number of arab, perhaps african immigrants (some africans studied here in earlier times).
So, I guess, you might meet relatively friendly attitude during the process...
(I had the experience of lining up for Visa in Austria in the nineties, at least compared to that)

I'm in the same boat as Regwo -- eligible to apply, but in want of more information. 

Regwo, have you been actively pursuing the process since your OP?  Has anyone else gone through the process and have anything to share concerning requisite Magyar literacy, paperwork, etc...?

Hello,

I'm going through the oath (esku) in Cleveland, Ohio on May 28 as well as getting my passport the same day. They sent me the oath in Hungarian as it has to be said in Hungarian. My Hungarian is horrible, as I self-taught it, but they accepted it! I was wondering if we all said the oath together as one or individually? Do they also give instructions in English to come up and receive the diploma? The only problems I had was getting the forms, as they do not send them to you until you have an appointment. The lady was nice and did the whole procedure in Hungarian and then English for me. It was nerve-wrecking, but well worth it. Any help on the oath would be appreciated (i.e. if its all at once or said individually)

Hope this helps,
Parobek82

Just a note for US Citizens considering getting a Hungarian, or other nationality, passport (and I expect Parobek82 already knows this -- so this is for others who may wonder about dual citizen ship), it is perfectly allowed by US law, and the US citizen can keep their US citizenship if they want to as long as they do not commit any of the potential citizenship loosing acts as detailed in Section 349 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. More details here:

http://travel.state.gov/law/citizenship … p_778.html

Note this is not the same for other nationalities. Ethnic Hungarians living in Slovakia, for example, who were recently allowed to apply for and get a Hungarian passport immediately lost their Slovakian passport when they received their Hungarian passport, as that was Slovakian law at the time (the law has since been modified so they now retained their Slovakian passport). So do be aware of your own national laws, not all allow dual citizenship.

Hi - I've been aware of that!!

Parobek82

Hello.
My grandfather was Hungarian and I satisfied the requirements for proving this (all his papers in original) as well as my parents' marriage and all birth certificates.
The Embassy staff were very kind and my Hungarian is very very basic.
I enrolled in a school for private classes to show them I was serious about learning the language and my papers were accepted as well as my application for simplified naturalization. 
My question is can you sent me the esku (oath)?
I heard there are possibly 2 of them and you can ask the ambassador to use this one if you are taking the oath solo.
Also, how long did your papers take to process until you got an answer?
I understood from the Embassy that it could take 3 months but realistically it might be 4-6 months. (mine was easier as I have never been married and no children and financially well off)
köszönöm!

Hello,

     If you have a private e-mail, I can forward you the one they sent me from the NY Consulate. I live in Cleveland and they come here about every 6 months (September and May) for the Oath / Esku, passport applications, and to apply. I applied in September and did my oath the following (this past May). You have your choice of doing it where you live or apply or in New York or at the local consulate (if in another area).
     I wish I had shown them my Hungarian studies (but we were only allotted 15 minutes and had other things to go over, to show I was serious about learning the language) but I still had a successful application. I e-mailed them in March and was told my application was a success (it was approved in January, so about 3 months after I applied). I can read and write Hungarian, but my speaking and listening needs a lot of work!!  In June, I also received my Hungarian passport - so around 6 months in total time for everything to be processed and approved.

Hope this helps.

ok

Hello.
Parobek82 is right on the money with his facts.
I showed my grandparents were born in the Kingdom of Hungary,
filed my paperwork.  Showed I had joined 6 month course to learn Hungarian and I would say be careful of some sites that state they will help you prepare for the "test".  There is no test.
Paperwork is number one.  You are in between descent and naturalized = simplified naturalization.
Therefore your blood is number one.
Showing effort to learn Hungarian language is what matters.
Its a lovely language but takes time to learn.
Dedicate and have your papers in order.
My one page written essay was a promise of my selling of land in one previous Kingdom of Hungary land I inherited to buying a building in Budapest.  It is what my grandfolk wanted.
I was upfront and honest and simply love Hungary.

ok

This is interesting indeed. I was born Hungarian citizen and never thought about how one BECOMES naturalised Hungarian...Hungary's policies toward getting naturalised was most likely shaped by a lot of historical background as neighbouring states had a habit of expelling Hungarians (deporting them to Hungary too)and thus they had to be naturalised A.S.A.P (pronto). So I think this is why the time requirement (as it is in Western countries) is not determining factor. Decision is done mostly on bases of need,desire and efforts of the applicant to be suitable, harmonious with this country's population, government, culture, etc. (Which - I think: is mostly impossible task- so decision can only be made by ignoring a few facts by the judges.)
The main difference from the generally accepted practices is in the LOSING of citizenship! Hungarian citizenship can not be renounced or given up by the citizen.(One can submit request to have it revoked or annulled though!)
It is also very difficult process to have it taken from one. Only the Presidium of the Hungarian Parliament (which is not working all the time, just gets together as needed - not the general assembly!) can take it from a Hungarian...in most cases as punishment for becoming "unworthy" (although there are other - more mundane reasons of neccessity too)
I am not an attorney - so check up on my words! These are just what we had to learn as school-kids about the subject when we were raised as Hungarians.

Does anyone know what the citizenship oath is?

This is the otha I took from the NY Consulate.

Én (Your Name)
esküszöm, hogy Magyarországot hazámnak tekintem.  Magyarországnak hű állampolgára  leszek, az Alaptörvényt és a jogszabályokat tiszteletben tartom és megtartom. Hazámat erőmhöz mérten megvédem, képességeimnek megfelelően szolgálom.
   (Az esküt tevő meggyőződése szerint:)
   Isten engem úgy segéljen!

Best,
Paul

@ Paul -> Hello :) In english please ;) Thanks. Karen :)

karen :

@ Paul -> Hello :) In english please ;) Thanks. Karen :)

Sorry Karen, I would like to ask that you read the context before commenting. Paul quoted the text in the local language exactly as he was asked and the hungarian text does help for those interested in the subject matter. Please be reasonable on such 'forum rules'.

Hello, my first post.

I'm a first-generation American, both parents are from Hungary, easily documented ... és beszélek magyarul elég jól ( = I speak Hungarian well enough).  Simplified naturalization should be a slam-dunk for me, except for one thing.  I have a felony in my background, very old but pretty serious.

The online documentation I've found all says simplified naturalization is for people w/o a record ... but I can't find any indication as to how it's handled for people with one ... blanket refusal? case-by-case? statute of limitations?  Does anyone have any idea?

Thanks in advance.

If your parents are Hungarian and you are first gen American, you are not naturalized but Hungarian by descent which means they must give you Hungarian citizenship = easy process.

IF you are asked about a criminal past which was one of the sections on simplified naturalization docs, you should answer honestly.  I had a background check done as I thought I needed it and while "being clean", they stated they just needed to see it but it was not required to be submitted.  They do their own check. I don't know how easily the US supplies info but it seems like a business there and perhaps less hoops for a country to find out your past.  Charges also differ than an actual conviction is something I read on the docs.  Charges = nothing but convictions = possible issues.  Not sure where your "felony" lies.

Good luck!

I also have some questions about this process for those who were successful (Parobek82, blonder, others?). During the interview did you have to provide Hungarian translations of your American (English-language) documents, e.g. birth certificate? Or were the originals good enough? How much of the interview was conducted in Hungarian vs. in English if you didn't understand something? Many thanks!

Basic knowledge or a willing to learn (I showed my Hungarian school receipt) and that suffices.
Let Consul do the translations and they will charge you.
Mine was around $200 for trans fees.
Waiting 9 months now and was told maybe in the next month.
A lady in Ottawa was 4 months and others 10 months.
Varies I guess.

I had to get my own documents translated. If it direct from English to Hungarian, then it does not need to be stamped / notarized. If it is from another language, yo need to get it translated into English first, which has to be notarized/stamped and then into Hungarian. All of the Hungarian translations are stamped by the consulate. I brought my language studies w/ me, but did not get to give it to them. They were nice, and translated the interview into English for me, as my Hungarian is not good, although they have to do it in Hungarian (as they said it was the law, so they did it in Hungarian then English). The Hungarian CV is also sufficient. The interview is free, except if the do any translating work. Each consulate has the authority to decide what is sufficient, as I have heard stories from around the world of something not being acceptable in one place and then acceptable in another place.

Good Luck,
I hope this helps,
Best,
Parobek82

Hi people,

I just came across this forum and it seems that there are very knowledgeable people here...

I'm helping a friend get her Hungarian Citizenship & passport so she can live and work in the EU. At the moment she is in the process of getting her grandmother birth certificate (she's the Hungarian one). Once she gets that, I wanted to ask you (hope you can help me):

- Would she apply for the Simplified naturalization or, as Blonder says, would she be Hungarian by descent?
- What documents does she need to start the process? I'm assuming grandmother's, mother's and her birth certificates. Translated to Hungarian? Authenticated by a lawyer?
- What about the felony check? She's ok with that, but what's the document that supports that?
- Do you know if it's quicker to do the submission in Hungary rather than the Hungarian embassy in London for example?
- Anyone has been through the interview? How much do you have to speak to be accepted?

Thanks in advance for your help!

Federico

fedestier :

- What about the felony check? She's ok with that, but what's the document that supports that?

I had to do this to gain residency in Europe (in Switzerland). I went to the police, both in the US and Switzerland, got fingerprinted, which were then used to do a background check (both by the US FBI and Interpol I assume), and then the police issued a document stating I was not a criminal, which I provided to the immigration office.

That was over a decade ago. Today they may ask for more (cheek swab (for DNA) ?), but the process should still be similar.

Hi everyone, I would just like to share my experience in obtaining Hungarian citizenship so far. Two months ago I made an application for Hungarian citizenship at the consulate in Los Angeles. I DO NOT speak Hungarian and the consulate staff were very nice and helpful. I submitted my completed forms (in Hungarian) and made a passport application without issue as well. I was told that I should expect my Hungarian passport in the mail within 6 months.

I am applying through my grandfather who is ALIVE and a Hungarian citizen. He was born in Budapest but immigrated to the United States and currently holds dual citizenship. The consulate staff made it clear to me that the language requirement does not apply to me. I think this is because I am eligible for citizenship based on principles of jus sanguinis (right of blood). I completed the "declaration of citizenship" paperwork, avoiding the "simplified naturalization" procedure. My mother was born in the United States and does not have Hungarian citizenship. I just needed to supply the birth certificates that show the chain of descent from my Hungarian grandfather.
 

I'm curious to know if anyone else has had a similar experience as easy as mine.

audiophile :

I am applying through my grandfather who is ALIVE and a Hungarian citizen. ... My mother was born in the United States and does not have Hungarian citizenship. I just needed to supply the birth certificates that show the chain of descent from my Hungarian grandfather.

From the law (at least the version translated into English):

Derivation of Hungarian Citizenship
Section 3

1.       The child of a Hungarian citizen shall become a Hungarian citizen by birth.

So one interpretation: your mother is a Hungarian citizen, since her father (your grandfather) is one. And ergo, so are you, since your mother is one (even if she never formalized it or got a passport).

audiophile :

I'm curious to know if anyone else has had a similar experience as easy as mine.

My experience in Hungary is that you can get different answers to the same question from different offices. So be thankful you got an easy answer.  ;)

Hello, can anyone advise me regarding getting naturalized. I lived in Hungary for 10 years, then I left and I now have citizenship in another country. I would like to get naturalized. Is there any way I can make a case for myself? I do not have any Hungarian relatives, but I obviously have a tie to the community- I am a permanent resident as well. And my brother was actually born there.
Would they let me apply? I went to hungarian school and speak the language.
They seem to have 8 year rule of living there, in order to be naturalised. Could I make a case that I lived there for that long then left because of family but now want to come back?

hungary84 :

....Would they let me apply? I went to hungarian school and speak the language.
They seem to have 8 year rule of living there, in order to be naturalised....

I looked at it once quite a time a go and I think you had to live in the country for 5 years or so, have job, pay taxes etc and be of good character.  It can also be confered on a person as a honour.   5 years is quite a long time or so. Other countries only need about 3 years. If one has another citizenship from the EU, then it doesn't really make any difference to be Hungarian.

Yes I did live there more than 5 years, but I was a student less than 18 years old. But my question more is did I have to live there 5 years right before applying or not?

hungary84 :

Yes I did live there more than 5 years, but I was a student less than 18 years old. But my question more is did I have to live there 5 years right before applying or not?

Yes, it was about 5 years. However, as you were a minor, maybe it does not count.  My knowledge is vague because I looked at it more than 10 years ago. My reasons at the time was because Hungary was not in the EU. Obviously once it became an EU member, it was irrelevant.

I do remember the language skill test was an issue. I also remember that it was necessary to have worked here for a number of years (i.e. not be a burden on the state) etc.  I think it should be easy to find out from the Hungarian embassy in your location or simply Google it.

BTW, 5 years seems a lot to me. In other countries like Canada and the UK, it's only about 3 years.

hungary84 :

Yes I did live there more than 5 years, but I was a student less than 18 years old. But my question more is did I have to live there 5 years right before applying or not?

Look on Wikipedia (with caution).  There's a page on HU nationality.

See here: Wikipedia Nationality - click here

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