Close

Dual citizenship in Vietnam for a Viet Kieu?

To Yeshuafollower :
I've been here/USA for almost 40 years and couldn't agree with you more. Many expats in US often said in VN there are "Laws of Jungle", but  not many mentioned about the "Jungle of Laws" in USA, which basically the same, many with intention to rob the poor, the uneducated.
In term of economy, VN has "Central Economy Policy", created and control by Gov./Party in almost every aspects. In USA, the economy is control by the FED (or should I used the word "manipulate" to be more exact) and by the few individuals.
In politics, VN has only one party, which the USA has 2 main parties (Dem. & Repub.), but it's like 2 sides of a coin - control by an owner. The parties may have some differences in principle, and basically for the last 60 yrs. are the same. The USA has been up & down for decades, but the direction is keep going down in term of quality of life.

Ok, so I recently obtained a dual citizenship & passport, travelled throughout Vietnam, HCMC, Da Lat, Nha Trang, Hanoi.  Now back in NYC. We basically did the tourist stuff, food, sightseeing, enjoying the beach, sun & sand.

What stood out to me though, is that Vietnam is rapidly developing but still maintains a very third world feel. For example, my girlfriend got her purse snatched by a masked motorbike-man in the middle of a busy street in HCMC. It occurred to me that there is a large class divide & lack of public transportation for this to have happened; rich & poor live very differently in this country, though new developments, nice malls, foreign investments like new restaurants pour into this country, people have to resort on petty crime to survive. In USA, the middle class is definitely shrinking, but the poor here have safety nets like welfare. Not sure if Vietnam takes care of their citizens there like how they do here.

Though developing nations like Vietnam will continue to grow, they just have to educate the poor while building a better infrastructure. It seems like the government is more focused on developing trading & tourism rather than taking care of their own people. I guess spearheading business may elevate the country as whole but at the expense of many social issues that continue to plague the underclass. Capitalism is pervasive everywhere, though I think developed nations are leaning more towards a Socialist model. Corruption exists everywhere, but you can still find good quality of life anywhere if you are able to balance income & cost of living.

As for everyone who wants a dual citizenship & passport, I do recommend it as it allows free entry for 10 years. I definitely will go back to enjoy the good food & weather. But shall be more careful next time. Hope crime will be lower soon...

I am coming Home .

To Vietnam . 

RonnP , Yeshuafollower , I am blessed with a loving future spouse and two children . I have already sent my mother's China set to the Family , and I may send my fathers World War 2 Korea uniforms also he was an Army airman .
Vietnam isn't perfect but I believe it is a very good country I would rather live with a woman who loves me on a rubber farm in the highlands then waste any more time in the country I was born from the United States .
I will bring my life and my energies home to the two babies and the woman I'll give my life to and I will be a truly blessed man .

Yes .
The United States is a government oligarchy ran by two parties that believe in one thing overall bigger more intrusive more militarized government .  Police in this country are becoming shock troops whether you're black white Latino or Asian . You will be incarcerated if you question an officer .
If you are interfering ... you are incarcerated .
In the next election 2016 we have two families again running for public office Clinton Bush .
In Vietnam there may be more central planning but Vietnam relies upon family ties to take care of their poor .

Here we lock the elderly away to rot in rest homes .
There is no longer any human dignity in the United States we gave it all up to be safe from terrorism ,  to be safe from want
, to be safe from being critically and honestly graded in our studies in institutions of higher learning ... even the universities are full of Deadwood .
I am happy and proud for Vietnamese people . Their hard work and dedication to families to , to their nation is lifting them up.  Nothing is ever perfect ! never !!  but I believe that the Vietnamese are on the right path . I am happy for them... yes .

Hello everyone!

New member here, doing some research and stumbled on the forum.  Hoping to get an opinion on my situation...

I was born in Vietnam in 1978 and still have a copy of my original Vietnamese birth certificate (with my full Vietnamese name).  Came to the US with my mother in 1979 and now have a US passport (but with my American name). 

Right now I am traveling and currently in Siem Reap.  I will be going to HCM next.  I was considering just getting the 3 month single visit visa and paying whatever the current fee is ($130?).  But then saw the option for Visa exemptions for Viet Kieu and thought maybe I can take advantage of that.  Also, further considering attempting to get a Vietnamese Passport if that's a possibility?

So I'm wondering if it's possible to obtain the Visa Exemption while in Siem Reap, Cambodia first?  Secondly, do you suggest attempting to get my Vietnam Passport in HCM?  Thanks so much for reading!

Any updates? Has any Viet Khieu been able to get their passport since this policy expired? I still have my old passport but it has my Vietnamese name, not my adopted American name.

hhhmmm you are confused as sh**t like we say in the Western world.
no you are wrong - a few ruling families look after themselves and pocket. The vast majority of the people will remain poor as sh**t. its like keeping the animals in the cages.. feed them as long as they dont die.
yes the US / democracy is never perfect. Will never be.
many people sacrifice their life for Vietnam for freedom .
I worked in Hanoi for 8 months and can see what I said. anyway good luck.

You and kawanv are oversimplifying a complex and changing society from very different political perspectives. I've been in and out of Viet Nam since 1969 and have owned property here since 1997. My child-bride of 42 years is Vietnamese. I have 21 semester hours of Vietnamese language credits on my U of Maryland BA transcript. But, instead of telling the readers what to think, I will give solid advice as to how they can research the issue and reach their own  perspective.

The Military and Political archives in Ha Noi have been opening up for several years and those interested will find that books like "Hanoi's War" http://www.uncpress.unc.edu/browse/book … le_id=2850 give a much more balanced view and one that comes much closer to what I have observed during 3 Military tours and an estimated dozen or more civilian years in Viet Nam than either VietnamVenice3260 or kawanv.

For those who speak Vietnamese, may I suggest that you ask your Vietnamese friends about the relative responsibility of Le Duan, JFK and LBJ for the war. Ask about the Le Duan and Ho Chi Minh relationship as well. The answers to that question are mind boggling.

Do the research. Make up your own minds

71 year old retired SSG

I don't know about the policies in Vn, I'm just packing up and getting ready to fly over in January, but I can tell you unequivocally that everything stated about the United States is true to a T.

Hi Howie,

As you said you are dual American/Vietnamese citizenship, do you have any information about something like you will be detained under Vietnam law if you get into any troubles in Vietnam soil without or little helps from the US government?
I'm a Vietnamese married to a US citizen. We are about to have a kid. I'm thinking of applying for him dual citizenship (so that he will be able to do businesses in VIetnam) but I concerned about the tie to VN law like he has to join army or the reason I asked you above.
Hope to hear from you.

Thanks
Cynthia

cynthiatruong :

Hi Howie,

As you said you are dual American/Vietnamese citizenship, do you have any information about something like you will be detained under Vietnam law if you get into any troubles in Vietnam soil without or little helps from the US government?
I'm a Vietnamese married to a US citizen. We are about to have a kid. I'm thinking of applying for him dual citizenship (so that he will be able to do businesses in VIetnam) but I concerned about the tie to VN law like he has to join army or the reason I asked you above.
Hope to hear from you.

Thanks
Cynthia

Note, except for people with some form of Diplomatic Immunity, anyone who commits a crime in any country can be arrested, tried, convicted, imprisoned/executed etc. by the government of the country where the crime is commuted. I worked as Military Police for a couple of years in Japan. If a Soldier, Sailor, Airman or Marine committed a crime off base and the Japanese Police wanted him, we turned him over to the Japanese Police. Note, International Custom and sometimes Bilateral Agreements, do allow the Embassy to send an Embassy representative to visit you in Prison once a month.

cynthiatruong :

I'm a Vietnamese married to a US citizen. We are about to have a kid. I'm thinking of applying for him dual citizenship (so that he will be able to do businesses in VIetnam) but I concerned about the tie to VN law like he has to join army or the reason I asked you above.

It's not exactly the same circumstance, but when I once asked my wife about the Army with respect to her son who was 18 at the time, she told me that he could not even enter the Army if he chose to because his father is living in the US.  If what she said is true, I think it is unlikely that as as dual citizen your son will ever be pressed into the Army.

The only country where I have heard of that happening is Israel where the country claims the right to draft anyone who is Jewish and the right age into the Army regardless of citizenship.  What I heard is that individuals are faced with a choice of the Army or leaving the country.

THIGV :
cynthiatruong :

I'm a Vietnamese married to a US citizen. We are about to have a kid. I'm thinking of applying for him dual citizenship (so that he will be able to do businesses in VIetnam) but I concerned about the tie to VN law like he has to join army or the reason I asked you above.

It's not exactly the same circumstance, but when I once asked my wife about the Army with respect to her son who was 18 at the time, she told me that he could not even enter the Army if he chose to because his father is living in the US.  If what she said is true, I think it is unlikely that as as dual citizen your son will ever be pressed into the Army.

Interesting as Viet Nam does have 2 year compulsive service. Still, I'd check with a Lawyer to make sure and if War comes all bets are off.

If war comes, I'll be there.

If the US and Vietnamese governments find anything useful to the effort for me to do, I would consider it an honor. If I can't be useful, I'll stay out of the way.

70 years old :

If I can't be useful, I'll stay out of the way.

Difficult.

It's called Life.

Be careful.    You're standing in it...

Cynthia,

First and foremost, until you are granted Vietnamese citizenship, your son is an American for all that the Vietnamese care.  Now, once you are granted Vietnamese citizenship, the way things stand, there's a process that you must go through to claim Vietnamese citizenship for your son.  And, there's no guarantee that he will get it.

As for crime and punishment, 70 Years Old hit it right on the nose:  you play, you pay...  Anywhere.  The only time Uncle Sam gets involved is when your action serves his interests and/or at the detriment of Socialist Vietnamese.  But then, Uncle Sam seldom win such tug-of-wars.

Speaking of wars, the way things are, your child will be hard-pressed to get into the so-called "people's army," since he is half American.  The Vietnamese don't even want Chinese-Vietnamese in their ranks, let alone American-Vietnamese.  So, no worry here.

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Howie

@Wild_1,

To expand a bit, Vietnamese and American military interests are becoming similar and are the two countries are more and more working together. Unless China drastically changes it's policy to the rest of East Asia, that should continue to grow stronger.

Should China increase it's threats to Viet Nam and the rest of East Asia, war becomes likely. In that case all bets are off. At this point in history China is the only significant threat that Viet Nam faces. Being very careful about the loyalty of people with Chinese ancestry is reasonable and prudent, given the current  situation in the East Sea.

It's not as hard as it seems. My good friend was born in Vietnam as was his wife.  They are now both living in Denver, Colorado. Neither of them had a Vietnam passport and he didn't even have a birth certificate.

He called the Vietnam Embasy in Washington DC and three weeks later they both had Vietnam passports

Their three children were born in the US and of course are US citizens. He called the Embassy two weeks ago and now the children have their Vietnam passports and citizenship.

Moderators: No sensitive PII has been disclosed in this message.

@GaryFunk

Very Interesting. Unless I have gravely misunderstood the older procedures, this is a significant change in procedures.

I don't think it's a change at all. I think there are some, on both sides, that just don't know what to do.

I've met a couple of hundred Vietnamese and I've encouraged 50 to 60 to get a Vietnamese passport. It's such a simple thing to do. It seems that once the parents have theirs, the children are easy.

Moderators: No sensitive PII has been disclosed in this message.

@GaryFunk

Again this is quite interesting. What sort of timeframe is involved? In the early 1970's this was not true. Nor to the best of my knowledge, it was true in the mid to late 1990's.

Another question would be, what sort of political power did these people have? Even in the early 1970's those with significant political power, could get a passport almost immediately, those with out political connections could spend years of frustrated effort and never get a passports.

Note, I do know several Doctors that were able to obtain passports. But, I haven't asked about the details involved. I may well be ignorant about significant changes over the last few decades.

70 years old :

@GaryFunk

Again this is quite interesting. What sort of timeframe is involved? In the early 1970's this was not true. Nor to the best of my knowledge, it was true in the mid to late 1990's.

Another question would be, what sort of political power did these people have? Even in the early 1970's those with significant political power, could get a passport almost immediately, those with out political connections could spend years of frustrated effort and never get a passports.

Note, I do know several Doctors that were able to obtain passports. But, I haven't asked about the details involved. I may well be ignorant about significant changes over the last few decades.

In the case of Tony and Miami, it was less than four weeks. Tony is a black Vietnamese and was brought over in 1986. He had no papers or passport from Vietnam. His father was an American soldier and is unknown.  Miami came over as a normal immigrant. Miami had a passport that expired many years ago.

Miami renewed her passport in two weeks through the Embassy. Tony obtained his papers and passport in March and it took less than a month.

The children were easy. Since the Embassy has record of both passports and citizenship, they simply provided proof of parenthood for the children and (I think $170 each)  received their passports in less than two weeks

As far as political power, they have none. In fact, they are both working class and rather outspoken against communisim.

I don't know how things were prior to 2000, but in the past 10 years it seems pretty easy for Vietnamese 

On the other hand, I know a lot of Vietnamese that don't dare return to Vietnam under threat of detention. In fact, one lady returned early this year and was detained when she stepped into the terminal. She is still a guest of the government .

Moderators: No sensitive PII has been disclosed in this message.

Hi,

I was wondering if anyone can help me on how to obtain duel citizenship.

My current citizenship is US.

I have my original Vietnamese birth certificate (with my full Vietnamese name).

I have a copy of my birth year Ho Knau paper which shows my name on it.

Could anyone point me on how to start the process if possible?

Thanks much.

Don't do it!

Whilst applying for a certificate of Vietnamese origin, which is all i need to do my business, I was encouraged by the Vietnamese embassy to get a Vietnamese passport.

I've visited Vietnam a lot and have a 5 year visa exemption, why would I need a Vietnamese citizenship and passport as it offers no advantages and a lot of risks. If you get into trouble with the authortarian regime there, and it's quite easy too, you will have no help from any embassy.

I have never been in trouble myself  but what i mean by easy to get caught up is that on my last trip, I saw innocent people getting kidnapped by secret police just for protesting for a cleaner environment. They were beaten and thrown onto a bus and driven away. Amongst them was a U.S citizen, if she had dual citizenship she wouldn't get any help from the embassy. They probably wouldn't even let you contact them and you're on you own.

Even if you're someone like me and not looking for trouble, it can easily find you. Vietnam is still a police state and your parents probably risked their lives to escape from there. Growing up, I heard stories from the old generation about what life was like under the new regime but to see the brutality for myself was a real eye opener. After seeing with my own eyes what brutal oppression is really like, I am glad and proud to now be a citizen of a country that values freedom of speech.

@phikachu

From my experience, their is almost unlimited private free speech in Viet Nam. Public speech or demonstrations are an entirely different issue.

Note, over the history of America public speech or demonstrations have also been curtailed. From my understanding pro German public protests during WWI and pro Japanese public protests during WWII were a bad idea.

Given the geo-political environment that surrounds Viet Nam . . .

@nace186


"Given the geo-political environment that surrounds Viet Nam . . ."

I fully agree.

But only you can assess the risks.

Me?   I have more escape options...
..nor will I explain them...

Only you can "Sort it out to suit Your Self"

Bazza139 :

@nace186


"Given the geo-political environment that surrounds Viet Nam . . ."

I fully agree.

But only you can assess the risks.

Me?   I have more escape options...
..nor will I explain them...

Only you can "Sort it out to suit Your Self"

"Given the geo-political environment that surrounds Viet Nam . . ."

As at this time, the geo-political environment that surrounds Viet Nam is shared to an extent by America and what is good for Viet Nam, in most cases, is good for America. At my age and my wife's condition, my decision will be made based on what is good for America and Viet Nam in that order.

I am always under the impression that dual US citizenship is not allowed.  Or turn a blind eye as long as the boat is not rocked.  But see the article below ...

Steven Seagal's russian passport

Yoda0807 :

I am always under the impression that dual US citizenship is not allowed.  Or turn a blind eye as long as the boat is not rocked.

My impression is that it is not allowed but is largely ignored.  The naturalization oath that the new citizen takes says to "absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which [they] have heretofore been a subject or citizen;"  However I have read in several places that this oath is not legally binding and that fact has been tested in courts.   You have to love the part about "foreign prince, [or] potentate,"  as entirely appropriate for the 19th century.

Maybe one reason the US does not recognize dual citizenship is that, unlike most countries, the US demands payment of income taxes by all citizens regardless of residency.  Your Vietnam wages may be excluded by the Foreign Income Exclusion, but you still must file a 1040 and things like profits from real estate or stocks in the US are still taxed.  Complete renunciation of US citizenship, as mentioned in the first post, is usually only done by Silicon Valley billionaires to escape taxation.

@phikachu
I obtained a VN passport in order to have a "2nd option".

All thing equally speaking, when you started to demonstrate against local gov., the brutal, injustice can be apply anywhere - especially in USA nowadays. Just learn about
the BLM protest events in Nevada, Oregon recently, and never forget about the
WACO, TX that gov. mass murder its citizen, many were young children.

Btw, "what is good for America" is a boat load of wrong ideas, as the Left & Right only thought for themselves, and for short term vision. "What is good for America" is not for just Democrat nor Republic. "What is good for America" will be the pain that all American will have to suffer soon or later - due to many decades of living on others' expenses, beyond their means - and should stand together to rebuild and protect their country. Otherwise, they'll fall into the "divide & conquer" trap that others already set up. Thus, the "2nd option" might become very handy....

This entire discussion, right back to the first post, reminds me of two simple homilies:

Don't jump from the frying pan to the fire.

The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

Does anyone know what the fee is for a Vietnamese passport application? I've called all 4 Embassies/Consulates and every single one has gone to voice message (all full).

Received an email from the San Francisco Consulate!


Here's what you'll want to know if you're a Vietnamese-American with a Vietnamese birth certificate:

• You can apply for a first time passport
• Fee is $300
• Processing time is 3-6 months

RIP me for leaving in April.

Kupo :

Received an email from the San Francisco Consulate!


Here's what you'll want to know if you're a Vietnamese-American with a Vietnamese birth certificate:

• You can apply for a first time passport
• Fee is $300
• Processing time is 3-6 months

RIP me for leaving in April.

FYI:  I have submitted my application 9 months ago in the same office.  Just got a call from my auntie here in SG that someone called her and asked her about me.  A letter will be sent to her to invite her in for more formal interview.  And that was a month ago and still no letter has arrived.

Yoda0807 :
Kupo :

Received an email from the San Francisco Consulate!


Here's what you'll want to know if you're a Vietnamese-American with a Vietnamese birth certificate:

• You can apply for a first time passport
• Fee is $300
• Processing time is 3-6 months

RIP me for leaving in April.

FYI:  I have submitted my application 9 months ago in the same office.  Just got a call from my auntie here in SG that someone called her and asked her about me.  A letter will be sent to her to invite her in for more formal interview.  And that was a month ago and still no letter has arrived.

Wow, good to know!

I was planning on rescheduling my trip to a later date but not 6+ months later. Processing time aside, the family member interview would have stopped everything dead in its track as I am completely estranged with my non-immediate family members.

Anyway, thanks for the heads up! I hope you get your passport before the one-year mark.

I'm from Bangladesh.
i want stay Vietnam, actually do i like
how i can get Vietnamese citizenship.
please any way
tell me

I'm from Bangladesh.
I'm Bangladeshi citizen
i want Vietnamese citizen.
actually i want stay Vietnam
how i can get Vietnamese citizenship
any way
please tell me

Kupo :

Processing time aside, the family member interview would have stopped everything dead in its track as I am completely estranged with my non-immediate family members.

I think it depends what you mean by estranged.  Do you mean not close or active dislike?  Isn't the interview with them mostly to just verify that you are who you say you are?  As long as they tell the interviewer that you are really their cousin, or nephew or whatever, it should be OK.  Now if they tell themselves why should I help out that SOB :mad:, or whatever the Viet equivalent is, then you have a problem.

I've also been looking at the idea of regaining my citizenship and holding a dual citizenship (Australian) for the purposes of purchasing property &/or running a small business in Vietnam.

I note most of the people replying have been from the US.  Has anyone done it from Australia? Was it a complicated process?

New topic

Expatriate health insurance in Vietnam

Free advice and quotation service to choose an expat health insurance in Vietnam

Moving to Vietnam

Find tips from professionals about moving to Vietnam

Travel insurance in Vietnam

Enjoy stress-free travel to Vietnam