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Dual citizenship in Vietnam for a Viet Kieu?

ehemalige :

II want to get viet citizenship. However, one thing that scares me most is the China- Vietnam war or any war. As china relies on heavy footsoldiers, being a future vietnamese citizen makes me think what happen if the country requires one to serve as a foot soldier or any soldier. As a viet citizen, they regard us us their citizen and follow vietnamese law. When Vietnam is invaded in the north by China or any other territorial dispute they will need menpower. Vietnam has done it before, when they drafted people to be in the war.
Any detailed insights on that ? I do not want to serve any war.

Good question...I am curious about this also. By the way, another option is to get a 10 year passport as I have stated before, which I plan on doing. Not technically a citizen but you can stay without hassle. In the case of your question, , as much as I understand, you would not be obligated to serve if something like that occurred.

If you're not willing to defend a country, don't take its citizenship. Leave that for those willing to stand up and defend it.

:one

lirelou :

If you're not willing to defend a country, don't take its citizenship. Leave that for those willing to stand up and defend it.

James or whoever you are,

I have seen several of your emails, but I have yet to reply to you...  That is simply because, like Lirelou had implied, you have little qualification in becoming a Vietnamese citizen.  Dude, when I became an American naturalized-citizen, I went to a war (Desert Storm) and a couple of armed conflicts (Panama Invasion and Somolia)...  I totally don't see the goodwill, on your part.

Lots of respect for you Wild 1

Love it when they want all the benefits of citizenship, but none of the obligations that come with it.

Yup, it's like highway robbery, or play but no pay...  Kind of difficult to fathom.

thanhniennews.com/society/millions-of-overseas-vietnamese-could-lose-citizenship-25047.htmlhis article: thanhniennews.com/society/millions-of-overseas-vietnamese-could-lose-citizenship-25047.html

It seems the program to retain citizenship was not very popular. About 0.15% of the overseas Vietnamese applied. Doesn't sound like it would be extended.

I applied at the last minute and I was surprised at how quickly I got a certificate - only 3 weeks! All I had was a scan of my birth certificate, and it was a US one stating my parents are Vietnamese. I didn't have my parents documents, since although the documents are still around, my Dad was not too enthusiastic about my applying for the certificate. I guess the next step is applying for a passport?

hey guys,

I posted some time ago for some advice on this dual citizenship malarky! ;)

So in the end the only documents I can find are:

1: my british birth certificate with my parent nationality outlined as vietnamese

2: My mother (passed away) and my fathers neutralisation certificate stating their british citizenship and their birth place as saigon.

I spoke to the Embassy in London yesy and the woman said as I am 31 and my parents do not have a passport, birth cert or ID from vietnam I can apply. Its tough as they do not have these and cannot get their birth cert as my father was from a small village where gis birth was nor recorded and my mum has died.

Any ideas please? I am really seriius and ready to go to vietnam in feb for up to 6 months if it helps sort this- I am slightly lost!!

thanks!

Kimberly,

As I had told you earlier, your situation is a tough one.  Your best shot is to travel to your parents' places of birth and, hopefully, back-track their birth certificates.  But, you must know exactly where they were born and your grand parents' exact names.

Bests,
Howie

Lirelou:  You are so right!!!

Hi Howie,

thanks for your reply I know you mentioned this previously.

The only problem is my mum has passed away so my dad is the other person who can really help and he seems a little apprehensive and has said they no longer have their passports (taken by british government) and thier birth certs which were lost at sea. He said that they cannot get copies of thier birth cettificates as where thet lived was so remote they were not registered when born. The docs he has given me is literally all we have. My sister has a vn birth certificate but otherwise this is it I feel sirt of lost here.

Thanks

Kimberly,

If that is the case, I suggest that you shift your focus on to other methods, like getting a job, of staying in Vietnam.  There are a lot of Brits living and working here.  I am sure you can do the same.

Anderson1 :

kkk

:huh:
Thank you for a very informative first post.

Why not introduce yourself to the forum with a little information about yourself.

Only just read your post, your sisters birth cert should be able to help you , were you born in the same place?, ( hospital ?), it should have details on it, which could be useful. Were you were delivered by a " doctor " at home? You could try getting statements from witnesses, and get these notorised here.
Or has your father got something to be worried about if HIS name is mentioned in VN, ( although I know many VN's who fled communism, are still affected by their memories of VC brutality, and understandably, vow never to return.

stumpy :
Anderson1 :

kkk

:huh:
Thank you for a very informative first post.

Why not introduce yourself to the forum with a little information about yourself.

Is he a member of KKK?

bluenz :

Is he a member of KKK?

Maybe he is Vietnamese or foreigner who chatted with Vietnamese so much  :cool:.
KKK means kakaka (ka ka ka).

ngattt :
bluenz :

Is he a member of KKK?

Maybe he is Vietnamese or foreigner who chatted with Vietnamese so much  :cool:.
KKK means kakaka (ka ka ka).

The ORIGINAL KKK would be much funnier to see in VN.

Wild_1, thanks for sticking with this thread for so many years. I'll try not to ask questions you've already answered here. From what I've read, I believe my girlfriend can reclaim her old Vietnamese citizenship. I'd like to run the final analysis by you.

She arrived in the US at 15 and still has her expired Vietnamese passport. Her family was granted permission to leave under the HO program around 1990. She cannot recall renouncing Vietnamese citizenship. As the US has no qualm with dual nationals, my impression is she did not renounce.

Here's where it gets interesting. Her father has been refused visas to go back over the many years. However, she and the rest of her family has gone back several times. My guess is that it's related to his being Colonel Tran, 48th Regimental Commander, 18th ARVN Infantry Division. Last major action: Battle of Xuan Loc, April 1975. He commanded 4000 ARVN at that epic last stand, then spent 13 years in reeducation camp. Her old passport and the fact the government knows who her parents are should take care of the question of proving originality.

It seems like the new generation of Vietnamese bureaucrat/politician isn't too interested in handicapping someone in her position. They want investment capital more than anything. If she can reclaim her citizenship, I'd like to marry her (we'd travel to Hue to do this), bring significant investment capital there, and eventually obtain my own Vietnamese passport.

I think it all sounds feasible. What do you think?

BTW, thanks for your services to the US armed forces!

(An earlier post seemed to ask if holding a Vietnamese passport subjected one to possible conscription. Of course, the answer is "yes". The only question is if they would force you to complete your term if you obtained Vietnamese citizenship after age of majority. I know an Afrikaner who reclaimed the ZA (South Africa) passport at 20 and they made him put in his 18 months with the ZA army. You're not really supposed to serve in a foreign army as a US citizen, but they had him so he was stuck. Also, even if you're middle aged they'll still draft you if needed. Citizenship is an all-or-nothing proposition.)

I hope I am posting in the right spot. I am an Australian (6th generation) whose fiancee is Vietnamese and she wants us to live in Ho Chi Minh City. Can I get dual citizenship and if so how please? I am twice lucky because I will inherit an 8 year old Vietnamese son.

Sprog,

You can, but only after you had come and lived in Vietnam for a number of years continuously.  Last I checked, it was 5.  But, you should double check that.  It's very similar to the naturalization process of other countries.

Thanks Wild_1. I really appreciate your reply. At the moment I commute from Hong Kong to HCMC to be with my fiancee twice a month. One week a month she stays with me in Hong Kong. I love HCMC and its people and Viet culture. I cannot wait until I can move to HCMC for good. Thanks again!!

Hi everyone, I would just like to share my experience of trying to obtain a Vietnamese passport (and thus claim Vietnamese nationality). Hopefully it will help some people out.

I was born in Canada to immigrants who came here from Vietnam in the 80s, and it dawned on me that as my parents were theoretically still Vietnamese citizens, I was eligible to claim Vietnamese citizenship and obtain a Vietnamese passport. After 6 months of research, visits to the consulate, and correspondences with sometimes less than helpful officials (I guess not too bad as I speak Vietnamese), I think I'm finally on my way.

To begin with, I got my dad to apply for a Vietnamese passport. As he has never held a Vietnamese passport, he was required to fill out a Overseas Vietnamese passport application (Tờ khai dùng cho công dân Việt Nam ở nước ngoài đệ nghị cấp hộ chiếu), a CV (Lý lịch) and all documents supporting his Vietnamese nationality. At first, the consular officials were doubtful as all my dad had were his Canadian passport and Canadian Immigration Visa and Record, but they allowed us to proceed with a contact in Vietnam to verify all of the information he provided.  First passports issued abroad cost 300USD T_T

Once we receive his passport, we've been told that we need to register my birth abroad in order obtain a Vietnamese passport for myself. Initially, we were told that this could not be done as I was past 14-16yrs of age, the supposed deadline for foreign birth registration. This came as a shock because not only did it make absolutely no sense that while my parents were Vietnamese nationals, as their child I was not (Vietnamese nationality law clearly states that the offspring of those born in Vietnam are also considered Vietnamese nationals), but we had already spent 300 USD applying for his passport. After some research; however, we found that there is a process of "late foreign birth registration" (Đăng ký khai sinh quá hạn) that should be available at all Vietnamese diplomatic missions (It's listed on the MOFA website, various embassy/consulate websites, as well as the official fees list), although it appears that many officials are ignorant to this fact.

So, after receiving my father's passport, apparently, all I need do is submit it along with my Canadian issued passport and birth certificate in order to late register my birth (500.000d). And then apply for a passport for myself (Another 300USD T___T). Voilà, proof of Vietnamese citizenship.

As I am at a ripe age for military conscription, I also raised this point with an official. Although his answer was quite vague, he pretty much said that I would not be conscripted as I was currently attending university. I also believe that military conscripts are reaped from household registries (Hộ khẩu), and as I am living abroad, I am not entered in to any such document. If anyone has more information regarding conscription, it'd be greatly appreciated. haha

sneakerhead253 :

Since the July 1st deadline has passed by now, does anyone know if this dual citizenship program is being terminated?

hi everyone,

this is the question i have too. thanks for all the responses i learned a lot until i came upon the article that said the deadline for dual was july 1st.

i just arrived here two weeks ago and i love it and know i want to stay or at least return for longer periods of time. regardless of the documentation and proof i need to provide, is the program completely terminated so there's no chance? if so, what are my options? thanks for the patience if it has already been explained...a lot of info to absorb on this forum.

Hi Guys,

I am coming to Vietnam next month and want to speak to someone about my application for dual citizenship. I spoke to the embassy here but they say my chances are pretty bleak, I would like to speak to someone in Vietnam though.

Can anyone tell me the starting point? Perhaps someone has a contact there or some tips? Which office will I need to visit?

Thank you!

KIM

Hey Kim,

You are really adament about this Vietnamese citizenship, aren't you?

The people you want to talk to are the Vietnamese Immigration officials (Cong An Xuat Nhap Canh).  Find a contact there, and get one to spill the beans. 

A little head up...  It is a lot harder to "get things done" now, than before.  You must get at "the good people" and be "good" to them, otherwise they just brush you off.
Best,
Howie

Hi Wild,

Thank you for your advice.

I will look this up and see if I can get an appointment.

I understand a little about how things sort of run there just hope I fond the roght person as I will only be in Hcmc for 2 days for this trip.

I hope that there is a way, the company I work for has an office in Vietnam so I will transfer if they allow me but it is unlikely as I work on a UK account. :/

Thank you!

Kim

Try this:
http://www.vietnamconsulate-sf.org/en/c … -passport/
NOTE:
1-The Consulate's site may be different for other country, the above is for USA resident
2-Follow the recommendation on option for how to obtain the first ever Passport (chưa bao giờ có hộ chiếu).
3- The fee in USA is $170 USD (cashier check), not sure how much is required for UK.

Best of luck.

TVBZ28 :

Try this:
http://www.vietnamconsulate-sf.org/en/c … -passport/
NOTE:
1-The Consulate's site may be different for other country, the above is for USA resident
2-Follow the recommendation on option for how to obtain the first ever Passport (chưa bao giờ có hộ chiếu).
3- The fee in USA is $170 USD (cashier check), not sure how much is required for UK.

Best of luck.

Just curious how do you know what this fee is? I am confused because I paid $300 to try to get mine in the US from Washington DC. That is the amount they told me. I still have not received it(long story) but is there really different prices coming from these people?!

I paid $300 & received my pp in 1 week. Nyc

Hi Wild and everyone,

My father was born in Vietnam and has a US Greencard. He doesn't have any other documentation. Should I encourage him to get a Vietnamese passport or is this unnecessary?

I have my US birth certificate that states his origin as Vietnam. My mother is American.

My grandmother still lives in Vietnam and is a Vietnamese citizen.

Will it be difficult for me to obtain the Vietnamese Origin Certificate?

I'll take any pointers!

thuyv :

Hi Wild and everyone,

My father was born in Vietnam and has a US Greencard. He doesn't have any other documentation. Should I encourage him to get a Vietnamese passport or is this unnecessary?

I have my US birth certificate that states his origin as Vietnam. My mother is American.

My grandmother still lives in Vietnam and is a Vietnamese citizen.

Will it be difficult for me to obtain the Vietnamese Origin Certificate?

I'll take any pointers!

Welcome to the forum
Are you thinking of a Vietnamese passport for your dad so he can travel there ?? If only going for a holiday consider the US passport. I see no need to the Vietnam passport unless going over to stay for many months or to live.

I am sure other forum members will get back to you with more information.

Thanks stumpy. He may want to retire to VN.

thuyv :

Thanks stumpy. He may want to retire to VN.

My wife had less documentation than that when we both retired over here a little over 7 years ago, and no living relatives . She's VK and I'm US. When he gets close to making a decision let me know. There are a few options that you might not be aware of and also some pitfalls you might not either. I'll be glad to help as long as your not from OC, CA.

Rick

Budman,

I see how you are (as long as you are not from OC, CA)!!! 

Thuy,

Budman might not have all his marbles, but he is right!  If that is all you guys want, there are cheaper and quicker alternatives.

Chuc Mung Nam Moi to both of you.
Howie

Wild_1 some how I knew if you read that what your response would be. I should have added "present company excluded" but you  dang well know what I meant. Way too many negative vibes come out of that place. You are for sure are an exception to that.

Sounds good. I replied to your pm Howie.

Budman1 :
thuyv :

Thanks stumpy. He may want to retire to VN.

My wife had less documentation than that when we both retired over here a little over 7 years ago, and no living relatives . She's VK and I'm US. When he gets close to making a decision let me know. There are a few options that you might not be aware of and also some pitfalls you might not either. I'll be glad to help as long as your not from OC, CA.

Rick

Thanks Rick. I'm looking into purchasing a property for him and I think it would be best if I had my citizenship too. Is that right, or?

I am an American and I used to think like you but after living and working as an expat for for than 15 years I see it differently. Actually if you think about it the U.S. have the same situational ethics as Vietnam --worst in my opinion. The only major difference is that we are more subtle than taking bribe: we invade other countries under the UN security resolution as in the case of Iraq, perform secret military coup and replace puppets who are so greedy to sell out their country as evidence throughout South America, Europe, Africa and Asia. Not to mention the atrocity we committed in the Vietnam war. I would prefer this 'lobby money' payment in Vietnam because: 1) this act does not kill people or children (500,000 children in the US trade embargo in Iraq) or 2 million Vietnamese, 58,000 American fatalities and countless of wreck lives both in the U.S. and Vietnam. 2) it does destroy the environment like the agent orange chemical which resulting in deformed babies where we can still see in Vietnam. 3) it benefit us as individuals who raise families and doing good thing to others instead of the luceferian bankers whose motto is to kill, steal and destroy in the name of crony capitalism.

Wild One ;
I am hoping to marry and make Vietnam my home . I have read some of the confusing regulations about citizenship . For US citizens cost of surrendering citizenship HSS climbed from 480.00 to a sum of 2,385.00 . Apparently many middle class go to Panama , and Costa Rica . My best friend is in Mexico all winter as his wife is from there . He is not a wealthy man either .

As far as fighting ... when I have a wife and children in Vietnam ... this tall Westerner will  fight for his children . Hell yes . Best to stand by the ones you love .
I am not too patriotic , but Family ? Don't hurt Family . Just saying ~

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