Shutterstock.com
Updated last month

Norway is currently one of the most sought-after destinations for expats. Perhaps because of that, the requirements for being able to stay there for more than 90 days have become quite strict if you’re not a Nordic or an EU-EEA citizen – and the fees for residence permits increased at the beginning of 2018. On the bright side though, the process is fairly straightforward and the Immigration website very informative and a breeze to use.

For Nordic citizens

This is the easiest scenario: if you are a Nordic country citizen, you don’t need a residence permit to stay in Norway. Swedish, Danish, Icelandic, or Finnish citizens can stay in Norway for six months without taking any action. If you plan to stay longer than that, however, you need to report a move to the National Registry within eight days of your arrival to Norway. Find more pertinent information and details on the required documentation here.

For citizens of EU-EEA

If you’re an EU/EEA national, you can move to Norway and start working (or looking for work) right away. But bear in mind that, no later than three months after arriving in the country, you must register with the police. Registration is free and you only have to do it once, but if you register as a job seeker, you have six months to find work – if you don’t succeed in your job search during that time, you have to leave the country and then come back and try again. If you get a job before you register, you need to provide the police with an employment certificate that will be given to you by your employer. Find more pertinent information and details on the required documentation here.

 Good to know:

Once you register, you can get a Norwegian national identity number and a tax deduction card, both of which you’ll need in order to open a bank account and qualify for healthcare and other benefits. Having a Norwegian national identity number will also make it easier to rent an apartment and find a job.

For non-EU-EEA citizens

If you’re coming from a non-EU/EEA country, you’ll need a visitor’s visa to enter Norway. The fee for a visitor’s visa is 60 euros, plus the service fee of the Visa Application Centre. If you wish to work in Norway and/or stay after your visa expires, you’ll need a residence permit (which, as of January 2018, costs 540 euros). There are different types of residence permits depending on whether you identify as a skilled worker (you have higher education and have received a job offer, or run your own business), a seasonal worker, a job seeker or a seafarer, but the permit fee is more or less the same for all cases.

 Good to know:

If you’re a researcher/lecturer, an employee of an international company, a technical expert, a medical practitioner, an athlete, a religious preacher, a journalist/photographer or a flight crew member/international transportation stuff, then you can work in Norway for three months without a residence permit. You can find more details on the exception cases here.

 Useful link:

Employment certificate pdf (in Norwegian)

We do our best to provide accurate and up to date information. However, if you have noticed any inaccuracies in this article, please let us know in the comments section below.