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Finding work in Dublin

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As Ireland’s capital and largest city, Dublin is a huge generator of jobs and attracts many foreign workers every year. Many foreign workers start here if their main motivation to move to Ireland is work, as it houses most of the country’s multinational companies.

Dublin's economy

Dublin is a thriving city, contributing to a huge portion of Ireland’s total economy. The city supplies nearly 50% to the GDP of the entire country, and employs more than 40% of the country’s entire population. It is also home to the highest number of skilled workers, hosting nearly 60% of all of Ireland’s international students, and with 35% of its adult population holding higher education degrees. Unemployment is at its lowest rate in nearly a decade, sitting at 6.4%. Dublin provides higher salaries than anywhere else in the country, with the current average clocking in at €36,388, though it can be much higher depending on your vocation.

Being the capital city, Dublin is home to a large number of government and public sector workers. Jobs of this nature are fairly plentiful, though not necessarily the highest paying. The highest paying sector is finance, of which Dublin is also the country’s hub. The Global Financial Services Index currently ranks it fifth out of all the financial service centres in the Eurozone. Thousands of jobs in this field are expected to leave London and come to Dublin after Brexit.

The other hugely growing industry in Dublin is technology. Many Fortune 500 multinational tech companies have moved their European headquarters to Ireland, namely Dublin, in the last few years thanks to Ireland’s corporate tax incentives. The area that houses most of these companies is referred to as the ‘Silicon Docks’ and there you can find the likes of Facebook, Google, AirBnB, and TripAdvisor, among others. In the city centre you will find the offices of Amazon, LinkedIn, Yelp, and Groupon.

Just about all areas of work can be found in Dublin and its surrounds. Manufacturing, construction and engineering, and pharmaceuticals are also huge employers. Being such a large university city, there is plenty to do with academia, as well as a large tourism industry. There are many hospitality jobs on offer for those looking for more casual work.

Dublin's find a job

The way you go about finding a job in Dublin will differ depending on your skill set and circumstances. You will need to work in certain eligible sectors if you require an employment permit.

Because Dublin hosts so many multinational companies, intra-company transfers are one way to make your way there. It is worth contacting popular international companies with your CV and a letter of introduction to see if they might have any vacancies appropriate for you. Alternatively, go directly to a company’s website to see if they list their job openings. If you already work in a large company, see if they have a Dublin office and speak to HR as to whether or not you might be able to move there.

Recruiters are a great way of getting assistance in your job search. Recruitment agencies, like Sigmar and Hays Recruitment, are on the ground in Dublin and ready to match qualified candidates with the right employer. They are also very helpful if you require temporary work. There are plenty of job posting websites like irishjobs.ie, indeed.ie, and careerjet.ie. LinkedIn is also a great resource and more and more companies are posting their available roles on the site directly.

If you’re already in Dublin, newspaper classified ads, notice boards, and word of mouth are also some great ways to find work. It is also advised to network and attend career fairs and job events when possible.

 Useful links:

Indeed
Career Jet
Irish Jobs
LinkedIn
Hays Recruitment
Sigmar Recruitment

We do our best to provide accurate and up to date information. However, if you have noticed any inaccuracies in this article, please let us know in the comments section below.
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There are various ways to find work if you are already living and settled in Ireland with work permission.
The city of Cork has a developed economy which is based on several sectors, namely the pharmaceutical and tech industry.
If you wish to set up a business in Ireland as a non-EU/EEA citizen, you will need to apply for the correct visa type and seek the appropriate permissions.
With a booming economy, the Irish labour market is quite dynamic, offering opportunities across many industries to those that would like to work in Ireland

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